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Publication numberUS2341675 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 15, 1944
Filing dateApr 6, 1942
Priority dateApr 6, 1942
Publication numberUS 2341675 A, US 2341675A, US-A-2341675, US2341675 A, US2341675A
InventorsWalsh John J
Original AssigneePenaljo Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe and process of making the same
US 2341675 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 15, 1944. J,- J WALSH 1 2,341,675

SHOE AND PROCESS OF MAKING THE SAME Filed April 6, 1942 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. Jef/v J.A WALSH,

Fr role/JFK Feb. 15, 1944. 1 1 WALSH SHOE AND PROCESS 0F MAKING THE SAME -1942 2 sheets-sheet 2 Filed April 6,

INVENTOR. Jf/A/ u. WALs/ Patented Feb. l5, 1944 SHOE AND PROCESS F MAKING THE SAME Mo., asslgnor to lenaljo, Inc., St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Missouri Application April 6, 1942, Serial No. 437,860

John J. Walsh, Afton,

SCIaims.

This invention relates to a certain new and useful improvement in shoes and to the process of making the same, and this application is a continuation in part of my co-pending application for patent for Shoes and process of making the same, :tiled December 2, 1940, Serial No. 368,181.

My invention has for its primary objects the provision of a shoe which is simple and sturdy in structure, which is soit and comfortable on the foot, which is light in weight and attractive in appearance, which requires for its production only a few simple process operations readily performed by relatively unskilled workers with ease and accuracy and with consequent savings in labor 'costs and the elimination Iof losses due to faulty and rejected shoes, and which is efciently serviceable.

And with the above and other objects in view, my invention resides in the novel features of form, construction, arrangement, and combination of parts and in the unique stepso'r process of shoe production all presently described and pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings (two sheets)- Figures 1 to 8, both inclusive, are correlated perspectlveviews of the upper, counter, platform covering or casing-members, insole, platform-members, and outersole, respectively, for the construction of a shoe of my invention;

Figure 9 perspectively illustrates the upper and counter of Figures 1 and 2 in assembled attached relation;

Figure 10 is an enlarged transverse sectional view through the attached upper and counter taken approximately along the line lll-l0, Figure 9;

c Figure 11 is illustrative of the third step in the production of the shoe, that is to say. perspectively shows the attached upper and counter of Figure 9 with the platform-covering rearmember in attached foldable relation thereto;

Figure 12 is an enlarged transverse sectional view of the partly formed shoe taken approximately on the line |2I2, Figure 11;

Figure 13 is illustrative of the next or fourth progressive step in the production of the shoe, that is to say, perspectively shows the attached parts of Figure 11 with the platform-covering front-member in attached foldable relation thereto;

Figure 14 is an enlarged detail sectional view taken approximately on the line M Figure 13;

Figure 15 is illustrative of the following or fifth step in the production of the shoe, that is to say, perspectively shows the attached parts of Figure 13 with the insole attached thereto;

Figure 16 is an enlarged detail sectional view taken approximately on the line lli-I6, Figure 15:

Figure 17 is a broken perspective view of the partially completed shoe of Figure 15 with the platform-casing members turned down for encasing the platform and with the front platform-member in cover-encasing position;

Figure 18 is illustrative of the shoe in its next production step, that is to say, shows the partly completed shoe with the rear or heel platformmember in cover-encasing position;

Figure 19 shows the partly completed shoe of Figure 18 with the platform-casing front-member in marginally folded-under and secured relation to the platform-members;

Figure 20 is an enlarged detail sectional view tgken approximately on the line 2li-20, Figure l ;V

Figure 21 is illustrative of the shoe following its next production step, that is, shows the shoe with the platform-casing rear-member in marginally folded-under and secured relation to the encased platform;

Figure 22 isan enlarged detail section taken approximately on the line 22-22, Figure 21;

Figure 23 is a perspective View of a nished shoe constructed in accordance with and emg my invention;

Figure 24 is an enlarged detail sectional View taken approximately on the line 24--24, Figure Figure 25 is a perspective view of a member employed within the shoe under the heel-portion of the insole for providing a smooth seat for the heel-portion of the heel platform-member;

Figure 26 is a longitudinal sectional view of a slightly modiiied shoe embodying my invention; and

Figure 27 is an enlarged detail sectional view of the heel-portion of the shoe taken approximately on the line 21-21, Figure 26.

Referring now in more detail and by reference characters to the drawings, which are illustrative both of a practical embodiment of a shoe of my present invention and of ,its method or process of manufacture, the shoe includes an upper A preferably, though not necessarily, of oxford type or conformation and constructed of companion vamp and heel sections I, 2, of suitable leather or other flexible material or stock cut to form and size and stitched together without lasting along central front and rear seams 3, 4, respectively, as shown in Figure 1.

Disposed within the heel of the upper A and permanently stitched thereto along a base seam 5, a top seam 6, and connecting somewhat sinuous side seams 1, 1, is a re-enforcing preferably soft counter B.

C designates what may be termed a heel-andouter-sole platform casing or covering, which includes a front section c and a rear section c' both suitably stamped or cut from stock matching the stock of, and conformable in size and dimensions for shoe-completing co-operation with, the upper A, the strip c being contoured and shaped for marginally covering the front and preferably part of the shank platform portion of the shoe and the strip c' being contoured and shaped for covering the heel and remaining part of the shank platform portion f the shoe, as presently fully appears.

The counter-attached upper A and casing C, so co-operably sized, shaped, and constructed, are assembled as best seen in Figures 11 to 14, both inclusive, and, in successive operations, the strip c' is disposed with its one or upper margin disposed in registration with the lower margin of the heel-portion 2 of the upper A and with its outer face presented in juxtaposed relation to the outer face of the upper A and, preferably by a single line of stitches 8 extending throughout the perimeter of the shoe at the heel-portion 2 thereof, is permanently joined to the upper A as substantially a unit thereof, and then the front strip c is similarly disposed with respect to the toe-portion I of the upper A and, preferably also by a line of stitches 9 extending throughout the perimeter of the shoe toe-portion l is also permanently joined to the upper A, as shown, with its opposite rearwardly presented ends loosely disposed in overlapping relation to the opposite forwardly presented ends of the rear strip c', as best seen in Figure 13.

D designates an insole, which is constructed preferably of easily flexible leather or other suitable material of suitable thickness and having a perimeter or contour conforming in shape and size substantially to that of the lower margin of the u'pper A, as will be understood, and, as the next step in the production of the finished shoe S of Figure 23. the connected upper A and casing C are marginally gently bent to arcuately extend laterally outwardly, as at l0, Figure 16, to overlie the margin of the insole D and to which the connected casing C and upper 4A are then permanently fixed as by a preferably continuous row of thread-stitches il.

Thereupon the rear casing-strip c' and the front casing strip c at its opposite ends only are pulled over and presented in depending relation from the upper A in the formation of a semi-casing with the forwardly presented free end-portions of the rear strip c' now overlapping the rearwardly presented free end-portions of the front strip c, as seen in Figures 17 and 18.

The casing-strips c, c', are designed to form or provide in association with the insole D a chamber, as at E, for snugly receiving and housing a platform F constructed of or comprising preferably two members, that is to say, a toe and vamp-sole member f and a combined heel and shank member j', both best seen in Figures 6 and 7. In this connection, it may be noted that the front platform-member f may be constructed of cork, composition, or other suitable lightweight somewhat flexible material, may be cut, molded,

upon their upper face with a filler strip I of l0 cork or other suitable relatively soft material, the shank I4 tapering in thickness to a thin edge along its forward margin, as at I6, for smoothly and evenly meeting the skived end-portion I2 of the front platform-member j.

Preferably the upper assembly comprising the upper A, counter B, and insole D of a partially completed shoe is now conventionally fitted upon a last (not shown), and suitable adhesive applied on the under face of the insole D, and the 20 upper face of the platform-members f and f'.

Then, in successive operations, a platform-member ,f is fitted and set snugly and evenly upon the under face of the front or sole portion of the insole D, and a rear platform-member f' then suitably fitted and set snugly within the chamberportion provided by the rear casing-strip c' and ilatwise at its upper filler-face against the under face of, and in marginal registration with, the heel-portion of the insole D and smoothly and 80 evenly engaged at its reduced or thin end I6 with the skived end I2 of the front platformmember f, as best seen in Figure 18.

Suitable adhesive is then applied to and upon the exposed marginal portion only of the front.

and rear platform-members f, f', and then, in turn, the front casing-strip c is pulled over the seam or stitches ll and presented, as it may be said, in depending relation from the,upper A in the formation of a stitch-concealing welt-roll II and in casing-completing relation to the rear casing-member c' and marginally turned under and secured adhesively to and upon the under marginal face of the front platform-member f, as best seen in Figure 19, and the rear casingmember c similarly marginally turned under and xed adhesively to and upon the marginal face of the rear platform-member f', as illustrated in Figure 2l. So assembled, the outer face of the casing C is now Substantially fully exposed and, through the absence of underlying adhesive, is smooth and attractive along the sides of the shoe. and the rear casing-member c' now has its forwardly presented ends preferably loosely overlapping on the sides of the shoe the rearwardly presented ends of the front casing-strip c.

Then adhesively or otherwise suitably secured to and upon the under face of the intumed marginal portion of the front casing-strip c and of the front platform-member f and to and upon the under face of the intumed marginal portion of the rear casing-strip c' and of the rear platform-member f', is an outer or wearing sole G previously stamped or otherwise conventionally cut in conforming size and contour from a suitable sde of sole stock or the like, as will be understood. Y

The inserted last being in due course removed following setting of the adhesive, the finished shoe of Figure 23 results and in which the combined heel and sole platform F is fully housed and concealed.

If desired, a suitably contoured and shaped section H of any suitable relatively stiff material may be fitted and set snugly upon the under face of the heel-portion of the insole D to smoothly support, as it may be said, the corresponding portion of the insole D to receive a rear platform-member f', as shown in Figures 25 and 26.

It will thus be evident that the shoe of my invention is extremely simple in construction and is, at the same time, very light, flexible, and comfortable on the foot. It will further be evident that, by my invention, I have provided a unique type of shoe and a unique method of making the same, which effects and. results in substantial economy, both in material and labor, and which may be practiced on a production basis at high speed and with comparatively unskilled labor.

It should be understood that changes and modifications in the form, construction, arrangement, and combination of the several parts of the shoe may be made and substituted for those herein shown and described without departing from the nature and principle of my invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. The method of making a platform shoe which comprises providing an upper, providing an insole of easily flexible material, providing a pair of front and rear easily flexible casing strips, turning the lower edge of the upper outwardly and stitching through the parts to join the marginal portions of the insole and the casing strips on opposite sides of the marginal edge of the upper, folding the casing strips to depend downwardly from the insole and upper in the provision of a platform housing chamber and with the stitched edges of the insole and the casing strips extending parallel with and on opposite sides of the upper with all edges substantially at right angles to the middle portion oi the insole and with the stitching extending through the edges substantially in a plane with the insole, disposing heel and toe platform portions within the chamber defined by the depending casing strips and against the underside of the insole, separately conforming and securing said front and rear casing strips over said platform portions with their marginal edges overlying on the under face thereof, and then securing an outer sole to and over the inner face of said platform portions.

2. The method of making a platform shoe which comprises providing an upper, providing an insole of easily iiexible material with a marginal securing portion, providing a pair of front and rear exible casing strips, stitching through the marginal edges of the flexible casing strips and the upper and the insole. folding the casing strips to depend downwardly from the upper with the stitched marginal edges of said casing strips and the insole lying against the opposite sides of the marginal edge of the upper, all edges being substantially at right angles to the middle portion of the insole and the stitch extending through the marginal edges substantially in a plane with the insole, providing a heel and toe platform portion, providing a filler strip on the upper heel area of the heel platform portion which filler is marginally of less extent than the platform portion, fitting the platform portion within the chamber defined by the downwardly disposed front and rear casing strips and against the insole whereby the middle portion of the insole in the heel area rests upon the filler while the secured marginal edges are received within the space around the marginal edge of the filler, conforming the front casing strip over the sole of the platform portion and securing the marginal edges thereof to overlie on the under face, separately conforming the rear casing strip over the heel part of the platform portion with its marginal edges overlying and secured on the under face thereof, and then securing an outer sole to and over the under face of said platform portion and over and upon the marginal edges of both the front and rear casing strips.

3. A shoe of the platform type comprising an upper having its marginal edges depending downwardly, an insole of easily exible material having its marginal edge downturned within the marginal edge of the upper and secured by stitching passing therethrough, front and rear casing strips marginally secured by stitching upon the outer sides of the marginal edges of the upper and turned over to depend downwardly in planes substantially parallel with the marginal edges of the upper, a filler against the under side of the heel portion of the insole within the connes of the stitched together marginal edges of the several members, heel and sole platform members disposed within the area dened by the downturned front and rear casing strips having their upper faces presented against the lower side of the sole portion of the insole and against the nller in the heel portions respectively, said casing strips being conformed over the edges of the heel and toe parts of the platform portions and being secured at their marginal edges on the under side of the platform portions, and an outer sole secured to and over the under face of said platform portions and the overlying edges of the casing strips.

Y JOHN J. WALSH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2446286 *Sep 22, 1943Aug 3, 1948Kamborian Jacob SForce lasted shoe and method of making same
US2464355 *Jun 18, 1945Mar 15, 1949Mishawaka Rubber & Woolen MfgShoe and method of making same
US2580037 *Jun 10, 1950Dec 25, 1951Jack MeltzerProcedure for making slip-lasted shoes with full-length sock lining and preformed counter
US2623223 *Jan 4, 1949Dec 30, 1952United Shoe Machinery CorpDevice for use in making sliplasted shoes
US2853807 *Aug 6, 1956Sep 30, 1958United Shoe Machinery CorpSlip lasted shoe the parts of which are united by a single locally reinforced seam
US2905122 *Jun 27, 1956Sep 22, 1959United Shoe Machinery CorpMethods of sewing slip-lasted shoes
US8099881 *Oct 19, 2006Jan 24, 2012Keika YamamotoBoots
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/19.5, 12/142.00F, 12/142.00R
International ClassificationA43B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B9/00
European ClassificationA43B9/00