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Publication numberUS2341677 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 15, 1944
Filing dateDec 15, 1941
Priority dateNov 21, 1941
Publication numberUS 2341677 A, US 2341677A, US-A-2341677, US2341677 A, US2341677A
InventorsWass John H
Original AssigneeWass John H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cylinder sleeve tool
US 2341677 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 15, 1944.

J. w ss 2,341,677

CYLINDER SLEEVE TOOL Filed D eo. 15, 1941 3 Shets-Sheet 1 I I INVENT R iy 5 M &8

Kw "M909 Feb. 15, 1944. H, w s I 2,341,677

CYLINDER SLEEVE TOOL Filed Dec. 15, 1941 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 ENTOR J05!) M86 I Feb. 15, 1944.

J. H. wAss 2,341,677

CYLINDER SLEEVE TOOL Filed Dec. 15, 1941' 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR Patented Feb. 15, 1944 CYLINDER SLEEVE TOOL John H. Wass, Essex, Ontario, Canada Application December 15, 1941, Serial No. 422,971 In Canada November 21, 1941 Claims.

This invention relates to a cylinder sleeve tool, and refers more particularly to a tool which may be employed either for removing or inserting sleeves in cylinders. It is now a common practice, particularly in the case of automobile engines, to mount removable sleeves or liners in cylinders so that, when worn, they may be re moved and replaced by new ones, thereby savin the labor and expense involved in reboring the cylinders and fitting special oversize pistons and rings.

The invention aims, among other things, to provide a cylinder sleeve tool: for removing or inserting a sleeve in a cylinder and which may be utilized with equal facility for either purpose; which will not in any way damage the cylinder or sleeve during the operation; and which is simple, easy and quick to use, eflicient in operation, and relatively cheap to manufacture.

Another object of the invention is to provide a cylinder sleeve tool including a head having jaws which may be arranged either to engage'the underside of the sleeve for removing the latter from its cylinder, or to engage the underside of the cylinder to hold the head immovable relative to the cylinder during insertion of the sleeve.

A further object of the invention is to provide a cylinder sleeve tool including means for contracting the jaws to disengage them from the cylinder after the sleeve has been inserted in position; thereby eliminating the necessity for reaching beneath the cylinder to do so as the space therebeneath is very restricted when the crank shaft is mounted in position.

Having thus briefly and broadly stated some of the objects and advantages of the invention I will now proceed to describe it in detail with the aid of the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 illustrates a sectional view of a cylinder in an engine block, and a sleeve in the cylinder partly removed by the tool. I

Figure 2 is an enlarged view showing the tool during the same operation.

Figure 3 is a section on the line 3-3 of Figure 2,

Figure 4 is a further enlarged view showing the head of the tool.

Figures 5 and 6 are sections on the lines 5-5 and 6-6 respectively of Figure 4.

Figure 7 is a sectional view of a cylinder show ing a sleeve being inserted therein by the tool.

Figure 8 is an enlarged view of Figur 1 also showing the means for contracting the jaws to release them from the underside of the cylinder.

Figure 9 is a section on the line 9-9 of Figure 8, with the release fingers disengaged from the cam slots.

Figure 10 is a sectional view similar to Figure 9 but with the fingers in engagement with the cam slots.

Figure 11 is a reduced size sectional view on the line Il-ll of Figure 10 showing the jaws contracted to permit removal of the tool in an upward direction after insertion of the 'sleeve.

Referring to the drawings, l designates a spindle threaded from one extremity for the greater portion of its length, and terminates in a head 2. The outer end of the latter consists of a circular flange 3 of uniform diameter throughout its width, and extending from the inner side of the flange 3 is an integral portion 4 of decreasing diameter. The larger extremity of this tapered portion is of smaller diameter than the adjacent flange 3 and its smaller extremity adjacent the spindle l is of larger diameter than the latter. Mounted on the spindle I for free axial and rotary movement thereon is a spiderv 5 having a plurality of integral radial pairs of lugs 6 all disposed in a common transverse plane. Pivotally mounted between each pair of lugs 6 is a jaw I supported for rocking movement upon a pin 8 each end of which projects into an aperture 9 formed in one of the lugs 6.

Aligned sets of grooves H] and H are formed across the outer faces of the jaws 7 towards their extremities. [2 denotes a coil spring the ends of which are connected to one another to form a ring. This coil spring ring is placed either around ah the grooves ID or H, so that by rocking the jaws 1 about their pins 8 the adjacent ends of the jaws are moved toward the spindle l and the jaw ends remote from the spring ring are moved outwardly from the said spindle. The inner sides of the jaws 1 adjacent their extremities are provided with heels l3 tapered to correspend with the tapered portion 4 of the head 2; and these inner sides of the jaws at their ends are indented at I 4 to seat against the periphery of the flange 3, for obviously after removing the spider 5 from the spindle I it may be replaced with either end of the jaws adjacent the flange. Between the grooves I 0 and H and the adjacent ends of the jaws 1 the outer sides of the latter are outwardly stepped at l5 and I6 respectively. The steps l5 project farther outward than the steps It. It will also be clearly seen from Figure 2 that the outer faces of the laws I are also preferably so shaped that substantially the lower half of each jaw lies in contact with the bore of the sleeve A when the lower extremity of the la ter is supported upon the steps E6 of the said jaws.

The tool also includes a bushing 29, an annular guide 2| axially slidable in the said bushing over the spindle l; a collar 21. having a thrust ring 23 therein; and a nut 2d, having radially extending handles 2 50., in threaded engagement with the spindle l. The underside of the guide 2! and the ring 23 may be provided with a plurality of concentric annular steps 2 la and 22a to seat upon different sized bushings 2B and cylinders B respectively.

When it is desired to remove a sleeve A from a cylinder B the spider 5 is placed upon the spindle l with the shallow steps IQ of the jaws I towards the bottom (Figure 2). The lower extremity of the tapered portion 4 of the head 2 contacts the heels I3 towards the lower ends of the jaws and forces the lower extremities of the latter outwardly about the pins 3. This movement is also assisted by the spring ring l2 which is then extending around the grooves It. The steps it then project sufliciently outward to extend beneath and engage the underside of the sleeve A. The steps l6 are of such depth that the lower ends of the jaws 1 remain spaced from the walls of the cylinder B. The bushing 20 is then placed upon the cylinder B, over the spindle I, and is retained concentric with the said cylinder by the guide 2|. One of the concentric steps 2 la formed upon the underside of this guide engages the top of the cylinder bore. The nut 24 is screwed down the spindle l onto the top of the collar 22, which has been placed upon the sleeve 2!}; continued rotation of the nut then obviously raises the spindle and its head 2, thereby also lifting the spider 5 and its jaws 1 upon the steps IS on which the lower extremity of the sleeve A is supported.

When it is desired to insert a sleeve A into a cylinder B, the operation, illustrated in Figure '7, is as follows: The spider 5 is arranged upon the spindle I so that the steps l5 of the jaws 5 are towards the bottom, and the spring ring l2 is placed around the grooves H which are towards the top. The spindle and spider are then lowered in the cylinder. As before the tapered portion 4 of the head 2 of the spindle and the spring ring I2 cause outward pivotal movement of the lower portions of the jaws 1 about the pins 9 so that r the steps l5 extend radially outward and engage the underside of the cylinder B. The sleeve A is then placed upon the cylinder B in position to enter the latter, and the collar 22 is placed upon the top of the sleeve. down the spindle against the collar 22. Obviously continued downward movement of the latter, caused by rotation of the nut, forces the sleeve A into the cylinder B. Regarding this collar 22 it will be noted that its underside has a plurality of stepped annular faces an outer one of which is intended to seat upon the top of the bushing 20 while one of the inner ones is intended to seat upon the sleeve A. The provision of extra annular seating faces permits the tool to be employed upon different sized cylinders and for different sized sleeves.

Due to the fact that there is very little space on the underside of a cylinder when the crank shaft (not shown) is in position it is dificult to force the lower ends of the jaws l inwardly, after the spindle I has been lowered somewhat, to permit withdrawal of the tool upwardly through the cylinder. For that reason a releasing member 36 is provided which is freely rotatable upon the The nut 24 is then screwed spindle I, see Figures 7 to 11. This releasin member is provided with a plurality of radial fingers 3| each of which coacts with a cam slot 32 formed across the inner face of one of the jaws I, so that as the member is turned the upper extremities of the jaws are moved outwardly about their pins 8, and the lower extremities of the jaws are moved inwardly sufiiciently to clear the wall of the cylinder A when the tool is removed in an upward direction. As previously stated the nut 24 must first be loosened sufficiently to permit the head 2 of the spindle to drop downward enough to permit this inward movement of the lower ends of the jaws.

While in the foregoing the preferred embodiment of the invention has been described and shown, it is understood that alterations and modifications may be made thereto provided these alterations and modifications fall within the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim is:

l. A cylinder sleeve puller comprising a spindle threaded from its upper extremity, an enlarged head including an annular flange on the lower extremity of the spindle, a spider freely movable on the spindle, jaws pivoted intermediately of their length on the spider for movement radially relative to the spindle axis, means engaging all the jaws above their pivot axes tending to draw their upper extremities inward and thereby force their lower extremities outward at all positions of the spider on the spindle, outwardly projecting steps on the lower extremities of the jaws, the inner sides of the jaws having steps formed therein at their lower extremities, said latter steps being adapted to be engaged by said annular flange whereby the lower extremities of said jaws are held against inward pivotal movement, a bearing member around said spindle, and a nut upon the latter adapted to be tightened against said memher.

2. A cylinder sleeve puller comprising a spindle threaded from its upper extremity and having an enlarged downwardly and outwardly tapered head on its lower extremity, a spider freely movable on the spindle, jaws pivoted on the spider intermediately of their length for movement radially relative to the spindle axis, a spring around all the jaws above their axes tending to draw their upper extremities inward and thereby force their lower extremities outward, outwardly projecting steps on said lower extremities, the inner sides of the jaws being tapered for a portion of their length to bear against the tapered head whereby the laws are retained with their lower extremities projecting outwardly when the spider is at its operative position on the spindle, a bearing member around the spindle, and a nut in engagement with the latter to be tightened against said member,

3. A cylinder sleeve puller'comprising a spindle threaded from its upper extremity and having an enlarged head on its lower extremity, a spider freely movable on said spindle, jaws pivoted intermediately of their length on the spider for radial movement relative to the spindle axis, means engaging all the jaws above their pivot axes, tending to draw their upper extremities-inward and thereby forcing their lower extremities outward, outwardly projecting steps on the lower extremities of the jaws, a tubular releasing member freely movable on the spindle above the spider, and means on said member for coaction with the inner faces of the upper extremities of the jaws for moving the latter pivotally outward and forcin their lower extremities inward, said head coacting with the lower extremities of the jaws and holding them so that they project out wardly when the spider is at its bottom position on the spindle, a bearing member around said spindle, and a nut in engagement with the latter to be tightened against said member.

4. A cylinder sleeve puller comprising a spindle threaded from its upper extremity and having a head on its lower extremity, a spider freely slidable on the spindle, jaws pivoted on the spider intermediately of their length for movement radially relative to the spindle axis, outwardly prjecting steps on the lower extremities of the jaws, means extending around the jaws above their pivot axes tending to pull their upper extremities toward the spindle axis and thereby force their lower extremities outward, the spindle head coacting with the inner sides of the lower extremities of the jaws to retain the latter in outwardly extending position when the spider is at its bottom position on the spindle, a tubular releasing member around the spindle above the spider, and means on the member for coaction with the inner sides of the jaws for forcing their upper extremities outward and their lower extremities inward, a bearing member around the spindle, and a nut on the spindle in engagement with the thread thereon for tightening against said bearing member.

5. A cylinder sleeve puller comprising a spindle threaded from its upper extremity for a portion of its length and having an enlarged head on its lower extremity, a spider slidable freely on the spindle, jaws pivoted intermediately of their length on the spider for radial movement relative to the spindle axis, outwardly projecting steps on the lower extremities of the jaws, means tending to hold the jaws so that their lower extremities project outwardly at all positions of the spider on the spindle, the periphery of the head coacting with the inner sides of the jaws to retain their lower extremities in outwardly projecting position when the spider is at its bottom position on the spindle, a tubular release member freely mounted on the spindle above the spider, pins projecting from the member, the inner sides of the jaws having cam grooves formed therein for coaction with said pins for forcing the upper extremities of the jaws outward and thereby moving the lower extremities of the jaws inward, a bearing member around the spindle, and a nut in threaded engagement with the spindle for exerting pressure upon the bearing member.

JOHN H. WIASS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2421324 *Dec 21, 1944May 27, 1947Hinckley Myers Division Of KenThrust element for cylinder liner removing and inserting tool
US2424681 *Nov 8, 1944Jul 29, 1947Clem EberhartSleeve puller
US2464034 *Jul 12, 1945Mar 8, 1949Hinckley Myers Division Of KenCentering mechanism
US2592420 *Feb 24, 1950Apr 8, 1952Oillie Howard CochranPulling tool
US2617181 *Apr 7, 1948Nov 11, 1952Chicago Pneumatic Tool CoCylinder sleeve puller
US2759371 *Dec 22, 1950Aug 21, 1956Bell Telephone Labor IncSwitching device
US2817143 *Oct 14, 1955Dec 24, 1957Curry Osborne BDistributor lifter
US2873514 *Dec 31, 1954Feb 17, 1959Smith Corp A OCam-actuated coil inserter
US3368270 *Apr 26, 1966Feb 13, 1968Theodore H. BabianShank type coupler and adapter inserter
US3942396 *Nov 12, 1974Mar 9, 1976The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyCartridge case extracting tool
US4372156 *Feb 17, 1981Feb 8, 1983Caterpillar Tractor Co.Method and apparatus for determining cylinder liner projection
US5321875 *Jun 22, 1993Jun 21, 1994Bethlehem Steel CorporationWell block centering tool
US7003877 *Apr 12, 2002Feb 28, 2006Spx CorporationCylinder liner remover
US7010840Sep 3, 2003Mar 14, 2006Spx CorporationCylinder liner remover
US20090102108 *Oct 17, 2007Apr 23, 2009International Engine Intellectual Property Company, LlcCam-action sleeve puller
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/265
International ClassificationB25B27/06, B25B27/02
Cooperative ClassificationB25B27/062, B25B27/06
European ClassificationB25B27/06, B25B27/06B