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Publication numberUS2342839 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 29, 1944
Filing dateAug 2, 1940
Priority dateAug 2, 1940
Publication numberUS 2342839 A, US 2342839A, US-A-2342839, US2342839 A, US2342839A
InventorsByers William B
Original AssigneeByers William B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insulating blanket
US 2342839 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 29, 1944. w B BYERS Y 2,342,839

INSULATING BLANKET Filed Aug. 2, 1940 ATTORN EY menteurs. 29,1`944 UNITED STATES PA'rlsN'rf/4 OFFICE j msum'rmd stamm winne'. n. Byers, mmm cua-luc. Application Amst z, i949, serial No. ssaozs 19 claims. (ci. 15s-'44) My invention relates to insulating blankets. The blanket of my invention is a composite insulating blanket, comprising loose insulating Y' nbers with covering sheets of paper for holding the fibers in position. It is particularly an important feature of my-invention thatthe fibers are absolutely loose, that is,'that the same are not secured to each otherin any manner, but are merely held in position in pockets, the fibers in each pocket being entirely unattached to' each other.

It is an important purpose of my invention to provide an insulating blanket having new and v improved means for holding loose fibers in posipresent in insulating blankets at present onthe market, such as those in which layers of-flbers -are sewed betweenf'two cover sheets to hold the same in position, and to avoid the difilculties in manufacture that exist in certain types kof insulating blankets, in which a mat of loose fibers is made by spraying an adhesive on the fibers as the same are laid into the mat. and drying the 'damp mat before covering it with enclosing sheets of paper. Myinvention utilizes the good properties of the above mentioned types of insulating blankets without having the defects of either. For example, in the stitched type of blanket the cover sheets are perforated by the holes made during the stitching process and thus cannot be made `vapor proof. In the type of blanket in' which the bers are fastened together in relatively flxed position to each other by adhesive.

the cover sheets have a pronounced tendency to separate furtherapart than the actual thickness of the insulation between the'm.'v unless the liber mat to which the Acovering sheets are cemented to form the blanket is denser than is necessary to provide the maximum insulating4 emciency.

'On'the other hand, my blanket canbe made vapor proof and the cover sheets cannot separate further apart than these are intended to. and yet the nber canbeinserted betweenthem ina lighter or iiufiler form than yhas heretofore possible in insulating blankets.

It is a further purpose of my invention to pro y vide an insulating blanket. in which the loose nber cannot settle orv fallout of position, and in' which it is possible to use a short fiber insulation, such asl wood fiber, orv wood cotton. without impr'egnating the fiber with adhesives, which may lower its insulating efilcienoy.

It is .another purpose of my invention to provide an insulating blanket that` is provided with a water proof and vapor proof membrane between' thel warm side of the blanket and the'insulation. This is of great importance. because in the previously known insulating blankets.' a

' puncture at anyplace in the liner of 'a panel of insulation lets moist air into the entire panel, vthereby ieopar `the emciency of the entire panel, while in my invention a puncuire will not let moist air into but a small section of the blanket, which in any case would be a very small fraction of the whole panel.

It is a further purpose of my invention to provide an 'insulating blanket that is provided with a series of overlapping pockets, or chambers, in which the loose fibrous insulating material is enclosed. This avoids all rbssibility of there being any air pockets that are unfilled withinsulating material between the two covering plies, the pockets being formed by an intermediate ply of material that is corrugated so as to make the same variable in length and which'extends back and forth between the covering plies diagonally,

being at no points whatsoever perpendicular to the outer or enclosing sheets.

` It is a further purpose of my invention to pro- 'vide stripes of asphaltic material, of highermelting point than that utilized over the maiorportions of the blanket, for securing the intermediate ply to the outer plies, certain of said stripes beingy applied to the plies of material at such Points that these will act to secure wide folds of the plies together to firmly secure these to each other, with' f one of said plies doubled back along the side edges off the blanket, to seal the longitudinal-edges thereo i 'Y Other objects and advantages of my invention will appear as the description of the drawing proceeds., I desire to have it understood, however, that I do not intend to limit myself to the particular details shown or described, except as delined inthe claims.

Inthe drawing: Fig. 1 is a fragmentary perspective view partly in section, showing my improved insulating blanket applied to a wall.

`Fig.2 is a fragmentary perspective view of the insulating blanket before application to the wall. Fig. 3 is a fragmentary longitudinal enlarged sectional viewthrough the insulating blanket, taken on theline 3--3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a section taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view on a still larger scale through one of the side edge portions of the blanket, and

Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view, similar to Fig'. 3, but on a considerably larger scale.

Referring in detail to the drawing. my improved insulating blanket comprises covering plies II and I2, which are made of a nbrous sheet material, such as kraft paper, and which can be either plain or craped, if desired. Mounted between said covering plies II and I2 is an intermediate ply Il and alternating bodies of fibrous insulating material Il and I5, which lie on opposite sides of the intermediate ply I3 and which overlap each other longitudinally of the blanket, as will be clear from Figs. 3 and 6. Each of the bodies of ilbrous insulating material Il and I5 extends crosswise the full width of the insulating blanket. except for the folded flange portions provided thereon along the opposite margins thereof, as will be explained below.

'I'he fibrous material is in a loose fluffy condition and is, preferably, made of a wood fiber of a character ordinarily known as wood co`tton, or may be made of waste paper, or similar material, treated in a manner to form a fluffy brous cottony material thereof. The intermediate ply It has portions It that engage the one covering ply II, and portions I1 that engage the other coverlng Ply II and are secured thereto. Said intermediate ply I3 is made oi' such a character that the length thereof can be varied to get the desired positioning thereof between the outer or covering plies. Due to the undulating character of its path in the blanket, it must, of course, be considerably longer than the other plies, and iurthermore there may be slight variations in the length necessary between any two points of engagement with the opposite covering plies to allow for any slight variations in the amount of the fibrous material in the pockets formed by it and the covering plies. IPreferahIy, the intermediate plv I l is corrugated to allow for the necessary variation in the length thereof, although other means could be used to get this flexibility of length, such as craping. It has, however, been found much simpler to corrugate the sheet, and such a corrugated sheet has all the desirable characteristics required of the intermediate sheet. Preferably, this intermediate sheet is made of similar kraft paper to that used for the outermost, or covering, plies, or sheets.

Along the longitudinal edges of the blanket the various plies are folded together so as to form a strong and tight seal. and nailing strip. or flange. The longitudinal edge portions Il of the covering ply I I are engaged on one side by the longitudinal edge portions Il of the intermediate ply I2 and on the other side by the longitudinal edge portions 2l of the other outer plv I2. The ply I2 extends at 2I along the opposite side of the edge portion Il of the ply I3 to that engaged by the longitudinal edge portion Il of the ply II and is doubled, or folded back on itself at 22, to form the outermost ply of the fold, which is formed by the longitudinal edge portion 2li of the ply I2. The ply Il is narrower than the ply I 3, and the ply I3 is narrower than the ply I2, the ply I 3 being also doubled back on itself at 23 inside the fold or doubled back portion 22 of the ply I2, to

form an outer fold 2| of the edge portion It of the ply Il that on one side engages the edge portion I2 of said ply Il and on the other side engages the outermost ply of the fold formed by the longitudinal edge portion 20 of the ply I2.

Each of the plies II and I2 is provided with an undercoating of wax 25 on the inner face thereof, which enters the' pores of the sheets, or plies, II and I2, and a coating 26 of asphaltic material, which has a lower melting point than the wax, the wax thus preventing any penetration of the asphaltic material through the outer plies II and I2, which might otherwise cause stickiness on the outer side thereof, such as might cause the adjoining turns of a blanket, if rolled up on itself, to stick together. The melting point of the wax is high enough above the maximum temperatures encountered in the atmosphere to prevent any melting thereof under any usual conditions of use in a building. The wax and the asphaltic material provide moistureproonng means for the blanket and the asphaltic material also serves as means for uniting the intermediate ply with the covering plies II and I2 at the points where these contact, that is, at I 6 and I1, as indicated in the drawing, and also along the longitudinal side portions of the blanket where the folds of the various plies are made to form the ilanges 2l. The intermediate ply I 2 extends obliquely from one outer ply to the other outer ply, and then along substantially parallel with the outer ply that it approaches for a desired distance, to form the pockets, tapering somewhat in cross section, and with the bases thereof alternately arranged to form the overlapping pockets. or chambers, foi the nuy wood fiber insulating material, or similar insulating material, within the blanket. The ilange p0rtions 21 are secured in any desired manner, as by means of headed fastening elements, such as nails, to such structural members as the studs 2l with the flat body portion of the blanket in contact with the at faces of the sheathing members 29.

The melting point of the wax 25 is, preferably, about degrees F., while that of the asphaltic material 26 is, preferably. about 120 degrecs F.

Stripes 26' of asphaltic material of still higher melting point are provided on the sides of the covering plies that are next to the corrugated ply and these stripes are, preferably, relatively narrow, in the standard form of insulating 'blanket in which the bodies, 'or parcels, of loose nuii'y fibrous material lying between the flanges 2l, are sixteen inches long, being about an inch wide, and two of the stripes being placed approximately at the side edges of the outer plies and the other two stripes being also about an inch wide and being spaced substantially about equal distances from each other and the two outermost stripes. l'he material of the stripes 26' has a melting point of about F.

The purpose of the stripes 26' of the asphaltic material having the higher melting point is primarily to fasten together the edges of the three sheets as these engage in going through the machine that makes the blanket, at a higher temperature than would be possible with the waterproofing asphaltic material 26. A final temperature of from 100 degrees F. to 130 degrees F. exists in the blanket at the time it leaves the machine. particularly in warm weather, because the blanket travels at the rate of from 60 to 'I0 lineal feet per minute as it is going through the vescasas 3 stantially 120 degrees, it willnot be adhesive enough to hold the sheets together in their proper relationship, while the stripes 26' will do this.

While considerable pressure .is applied to the v marginal edges yoi the sheets where the ilaps are formed to seal them, and these will seal under this pressure at a wide variation in temperature.

hand, only a very slight pressure is exertedy on the fibrous portion of the blanket, so that the fibers will remain in a iluny condition, and for that reason a very tacky asphalt of very low melting point is used for securing the intermediate ply to the coveringplies over that portion of the blanket where the iluiiy insulating material is incorporated therein. It is not essential that this be congealed as the blanket comes oil the ma.- chine, as experience has shown that. all that is necessary is to have such tackiness as to hold the middle sheet in place, which is accomplished by means of the stripes 26. The blanket can then be rolled up and placed in cartons after it leaves the machine,where it will go through the ilnal cooling step and solidication of the soft asphaltic material 26. The harder asphaltic stripes adjacent the side edges of the plies are suiilcient to hold the middle or intermediate ply in position relative to the covering plies, and while 4the stripes of the harder asphaltic material in the middle portion of the webs, or sheets, help-t hold the middle, or intermediate, ply to the covering plies while the blanket -is hot, it is not absolutely necessary to provide these intermediate or central stripes.

In the finished blanket the corrugations are almost stretched out and only a slight crimping is noticeable. v

While the middle sheet, or ply i3 is shown as being'wider than the formed bodies of loose ilbrous material, this is not absolutely essential, as these bodies could be heldin place, even if the intermediate ply did not extend into'the aps of the blanket, but ,weremerely wide enough to weave back and forth from one covering ply to the other through the brous illling.

What I claim is:

l. A flexible insulating blanket comprising a pair of spaced cover plies of sheet material, ilexible extensible means mounted between saidl plies to divide lthe space between the same into a pluralityof adjacent iiexible walled pockets, and loose insulating material in said pockets, said cover plies and said means being secured together along the longitudinal margins of said blanket to close the endsof said pockets.

2. An insulating blanket comprising loose iluify fibrous insulating material enclosed within an lmperforate covering of brous sheet material, and flexible partitioning means' entirely within said covering and secured thereto for holding said insulating material from shifting lengthwise vof said blanket with the ilbers thereof unattached to each other.

3. A ilexible insulating blanket comprising a plurality of staggered overlapping bodies of loose fluffy insulating material enclosed within a sheath of sheet material having a vapor-proofing coating on only the inner side thereof.

4. A flexible insulating blanket comprising loose fibr of fluily insulating material unattached to each other enclosed within a covering of ilbrous sheet materialk having a vapor-prooilng coating on the inner side thereof. and nexible means of sheet material entirely within said coveringy andsecured thereto to form ilexlble transverse parti tions for holding said insulating material from 5 snutmglengtnwise of said blanket with the aber;

thereof unattached to each other. Y

5. An insulating blanket comprising a pair of spaced cover plies of sheet material, ilexible, extensible means mounted between Asaid plies to divide the space between the same intofa plurality that is, from 50 to 130 degreesF., on the other of adjacent pockets having ilexible walls, and loose insulating material in said pockets, said pockets having walls extending obliquely to said cover plies, said cover plies and said means being secured together along the longitudinal margins of said blanket to close the endsoi saidpockets.

6. An insulating blanket comprising a plurality of staggered overlapping bodies of loose iluily -insulating material mounted within a sheath of sheet material, said blanket having an extensible ply of sheet material lying within said sheath and v extending between said vbodies to formv pockets having ilexible walls to hold ysaid bodies in position in said sheath, said sheath comprising plies h secured together along the longitudinal margins of said blanket to close the ends of said pockets.

'1. An insulating blanket comprising a plurality of staggered overlapping bodies of loose tluily in sulating material mounted within a sheath of sheet material, said blanket vhaving a ply of exextensible sheet material being slack between the points of'securement thereof to provide-flexible partitions within said blanket. A v g 8. A ilexible insulating blanketcomprising a pair of spaced cover plies of sheet material, an

4o intermediate ply of extensible, ilexible sheet material mounted between said plies and extending back and forth between the same to divide the space between the same into a plurality ofpadjacent pockets having flexible walls, and loose insulating material in vsaid pockets, said plies being all secured together along the longitudinal margins of said blanket to close the ends of said pockets.

9. An insulating blanket comprising a pair of spaced cover plies of sheet material. an intermediate ply of extensible sheet material mounted between said plies and extending back and forth between the same to divide the space between `the same into a plurality of adjacent pockets having ilexible walls, and loose insulating material in said pockets, said intermediate ply having portions extending alongside each of said outer plies and secured thereto and portions extending obliquely between said plies to provide inclined nexiy ble extensible partitions between said pockets.

10. An insulating blanket comprising a pair of spaced cover plies of sheet material, an intermediate ilexible ply of corrugated sheet material mounted between said plies and having inclined portions extending back vand forth between the same to divide the space between the sameinto a plurality of adjacent pockets, each of said inclined portions having a plurality of corrugations therein and loose insulating material in said pockets.

1l. An insulating blanket comprising a pair of spaced cover plies of sheet material. and loose insulating material between said plies, said-cover plies having a wax coating on the inner sides thereof and a coating of asphaltic material hav-v ing a lower melting point than said wax over said wax coating.

12. An insulating blanket comprising covering plies having an undercoating of wax on the inner side thereof and a coating of an asphaltic material having a lower melting point than said wax over-said undercoating.

13. An insulating blanket comprising a pair of spaced cover plies of sheet material, means mounted between said plies to divide the space between the same into a plurality of adjacent flexible walled pockets, and loose insulating material in said pockets, said cover plies having an undercoatlng of wax on the inner side thereof and a coating of an asphaltic material having a lower melting point than said wax over said undercoating securing said means to said plies a't spaced intervals. l

i4. A flexible insulating blanket comprising a pair of spaced cover plies of sheet material, means mounted between said plies to define the space between the same into a plurality of adjacent overlapping, oppositely directed, daring ilexible walled pockets. extending from one of said cover plies to adjacent the other thereof, and loose insulating material in said pockets.

15. A flexible insulating blanket comprising a plurality of overlapping bodies of fluily insulating material made up of loose unconnected fibers mounted within a sheath of sheet material. said blanket having a ply of flexible extensible sheet material mounted within said sheath for holding said bodies from shifting lengthwise of said blanket and in predetermined overlapped relation to each other, said ply having portions thereof extending along opposite walls of said sheath and secured thereto and oppositely inclined extensible portions extending between said walls lto form flaring, alternating, oppositely directed, flexible walled pockets extending from one wall to the other wall of said sheath.

16. An insulating blanket of composite structure comprising two external plies of fibrous sheet material, a longer inner ply of nbrous sheet material, said inner ply extending back and forth between the inner sides of said external plies and having portions lying alongside said external plies and adhesively secured thereto, said external plies being held in flexible spaced relation to each other by said inner ply, said inner ply being extensible between the cemented portions thereof to form flexible walled deformable compartments, and bodies of loose insulating fibers in said compartments.

17. An insulating blanket of composite structure comprising two external plies of fibrous sheet material, a longer inner ply of fibrous sheet material. said inner ply extending back and forth between the inner sides of said external plies and havingpoxtions lying alongside said external plies and adhesively secured thereto, said external plies being held in flexible spaced relation to each other by said inner ply, said inner ply being. corrugated between the cemented portions thereof to form flexible walled deformable compartments having extensible walls extending obliquely between said external plies, and bodies of loose insulating fibers in said compartments.

18. An insulating blanket of composite structure comprising two external plies of fibrous sheet material, a longer inner ply of fibrous sheet material, said inner ply extending back and forth between the inner sides of said external plies and having portions lying alongside said external plies and adhesively secured thereto, said external plies being heldin flexible spaced relation t0 each other by said inner ply, said inner ply being extensible between the cemented portions thereof to form flexible walled deformable compartments, and bodies of loose insulating fibers in said compartments, said plies extending laterally beyond said bodies and said lateral extensions being secured together along the entire length of said blanket to close the ends of said compartments and form iiaps along the longitudinal margins of said blanket.

19. A kcontinuous insulation blanket of determined width and thickness flexible in all directions, having a medial insulating portion and marginal mounting portions narrower than said insulating portion, said blanket comprising paper cover plies and a paper ply therebetween, the medial portion thereof constituting a continuous undulating web extending back and forth between said cover plies having spaced portions thereof engaging said cover plies and cemented thereto and free portions alternating with said cemented portions to provide alternately arranged overlapping pockets on opposite sides of said web between said cover plies, in said medial portion of said blanket, said web being transversely rrugated to form undulations in said free portions thereof extending parallel to the undulations of said web to provide flexible walls for said pockets extensible longitudinally of said blanket, said pockets being filled with a iluily mass of insulating fibres unattached to each other, the marginal portions of the ply between said cover plies being flattened and engaged continuously with said cover plies, said plies being folded longitudinally of said blanket and cemented together to seal said pockets and form multiple ply ilanges along the margins of said blanket providing said mounting portions.

WILLIAM B. BYERS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2484686 *Sep 3, 1946Oct 11, 1949Williameta B McdowellMachine for making insulating blankets
US3012603 *Feb 19, 1959Dec 12, 1961Reynolds Tobacco Co RApparatus and method for the manufacture of foil-paper laminates and corresponding product
US3041219 *Apr 6, 1959Jun 26, 1962St Regis Paper CoThermal insulating wall board and wall constructions thereof
US3318063 *May 26, 1964May 9, 1967Cleveland Fabricating CompanyBuilding insulation
US3835604 *Dec 14, 1972Sep 17, 1974Certain Teed Prod CorpBuilding insulation with decorative facing
US4294875 *Apr 3, 1979Oct 13, 1981Schramm Arthur GInsulation panel
US4416715 *May 27, 1980Nov 22, 1983Doralyn Ann HardyMethod and apparatus for fabricating insulative panel
US4510010 *Aug 8, 1983Apr 9, 1985Schramm Arthur GMethod and apparatus for fabricating insulative panel
US6001449 *Oct 16, 1996Dec 14, 1999Oceaneering International, Inc.Insulation panel with getter material support
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US6718716Dec 10, 2001Apr 13, 2004Graham CowieThermal insulation pad
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US8528284 *Aug 6, 2012Sep 10, 2013Mark A. AspensonThermal energy venting system
US20120018102 *Jul 26, 2010Jan 26, 2012Mark UngsFlexible insulated door panels with internal baffles
US20130036692 *Aug 6, 2012Feb 14, 2013Mark A. AspensonThermal energy venting system
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DE19846704C2 *Oct 9, 1998Jan 30, 2003Treu Hanf AgDämmstoffmatte aus Naturprodukten
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Classifications
U.S. Classification428/126, 52/406.1, 428/182
International ClassificationE04B1/76
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/767
European ClassificationE04B1/76E2B1F