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Publication numberUS2344181 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1944
Filing dateAug 3, 1940
Priority dateAug 3, 1940
Publication numberUS 2344181 A, US 2344181A, US-A-2344181, US2344181 A, US2344181A
InventorsStone George A
Original AssigneeStone George A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of and apparatus for treating cloth
US 2344181 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 14, 1944.

G. A. STONE METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR TREATING CLOTH Filed Aug. 5, l940 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 TOR Ge: 0P7? gr ff n e ATTORNEY S March 14, 1944. STONE 2,344,181

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR TREATING CLOTH Filed Aug. 3, l940 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 it! I 58 l- F 4 as? 22 i m E E1 okge fiZ Q EN- keyw I ATTO N March 14, 1944. A, S O E 2,344,181

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR TREATING CLOTH Filed Aug. 5-, l940 3 Sheets-Sheet} y INVENTOR gal? 14, X7on ATTORNEY 3 reamed 14, 19.44

2.344.181 METHOD or AND mm'rns FOR TREATING CLOTH George A. Stone, Columbus, Ohio Application August 3, 1840, Serial No. 350.536

20 Claims. (01. 87-1) The present invention relates to the method of and apparatus for manufacturing and treating cloth and more particularly to the treating of cloth while it is being manufactured by a machine, such as a circular loom or a braiding machine, for making cloth in tube-like form.

It is among the objects of the present invention to subject the strands, which form the tubelike shaped cloth, to a wet solution including a substance adapted to adhere to the strands, and, after the tube-like shaped cloth is formed, to apply heat from the interior thereof.

More specifically, it is a further object of the present invention to applyheated air to the interior of the tube-like shaped cloth.

Another object of the invention is to provide for first subjecting the wet tube to heat while the tube is in a relatively dormant atmosphere and thereafter subjecting the partially-dried tube to heated air.

A still further object is to first wet the strands with a solution containing a substance adapted to adhere to the strands and thereafter subject the entwined strands to a like but drier solution and thereafter apply suflicient heat and/or air to thoroughly dry the tube.

Other and further objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings wherein preferred forms of embodiments of the present invention are clearly shown.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a view in elevation of a braiding apparatus. For clearness of illustration, parts of the apparatus are, shown broken away and other parts are shown diagrammatically;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary view, partly in section and on a larger scale, of parts of the apparatus shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view on a still larger scale, of certain parts shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a view, partly in section, of an alternate form of heater;

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 3, but showing a heater for the exterior of a braided tube, and

Fig. 6 is a view taken on line 5-6 of Fig. 5.

Any type of mechanism for entwining strands or threads for fabricating cloth into a tube or in a tube-like shape may be utilized, and to illustrate one form of the invention, I have shown a conventional braiding machine such as that shown in the booklet entitled "Nebuttco Braiding Machinery Catalog 38," published by New England Butt 00., Providence, R. 1., for forming braided tubes. This braiding machine is generally shown at 20 for a tube 24.

The strands 22 are carried on a plurality of bobbins 28, only two appearing in the drawings, and the strands extend upwardly through an opening 30 in a plate 3|. The bobbins 28 are moved in sinuous, circular paths for causing the strands to be braided to form the tube 24 at the opening 30. As the tube 24 is formed it is drawn upwardly between rollers 32 and it is then directed to a suitable container, not shown, by rollers 34.

A wet solution of to the strands 22 is applied to the strands by a rotating wheel 38 having its periphery engaging thestrands below the opening 30. Preferably the wheel 36 has a periphery formed of soft fibrous material for presenting a wide moisture retaining surface to the strands. The wheel is rotated by mechanism, indicated at 38, through a flexible shaft 40. The solution, which may be, for example, a colloidal solution of latex, is directed onto the upper face of the wheel 35 through a tube 42 connected with a, receptacle 43. The wheel 36 is tilted toward the strands and the solution flows over the periphery of the wheel and bnto the strands. Thus, as the strands are moved in the circular path and upwardly by the braiding mechanism, each strand is subjected to the solution flowing over the periphery of the wheel 36.

A drying device, indicated at 50, comprises a tube 52, preferably formed of copper and a burner 53 for heating the tube and air passing through the tube. The tube is connected at one end to a source of air supply, not shown, and an elongated nozzle 54 is provided at the upper end thereof. The tube 52 is formed in a spiral 55 above the burner 53 and the spiral is enclosed by a stack. 56. The burner 53'is connected with a source of fuel through a pipe 51. The nozzle 54 extends upwardly'through the opening 30 and the cloth tube 24 is formed around the nozzle.

As the tube 24 is formed the strands 22 are pressed against the edges of the opening 30 and the excess wet solution from the strands collects at 58 intermediate the junction of the tube 52 and nozzle 54. This solution is heated by the heat from the tube 52 which thicfins the solution. The thickened solution is tacky and readily adheres to the strands as they are braided. Thus a greater amount of solution may be applied to the tube as the tube is formed.

The tube 24, passing upwardly over the nozzle braiding strands 22 into Q material adapted to adhere I4, is heated in a dormant atmosphere by the hot w i or the nozzle. This heat further thickens the olution on the strands and the latex is more firmly "set" on the strands forming the tube. Hot air is injected into the interior of the tube by the nozzle 84, which air passes outwardly through the interstices of the tube and thoroughly dries the tube. Thus the tube may be immediately wound on spools, for example, and the walls of the tube will not adhere to one another. The tube is pinched by the rollers 32 so that the major portion of, the air discharged from the nozzle 54 passes through the walls of the tube.

A tubular shield BI! is supported about the tube 24 above the nozzle to retain a warm atmosphere around the outside surface of the tube to aid in the drying of the tube.

Another form of heater for drying the tube 24 is shown at 10. This heater comprises a rod 12 having a shoulder 13 and aportion that extends upwardly through the opening 30, which rod is heated by current induced therein by a high frequency coil I4. The diameters of the rod 12 above and below the plate 3| correspond to the diameters of the nozzle 54 and the tube 52, respectively. The coil I4 is spaced from the portion of the rod 12 above the plate 3| and the tube 24, formed around the rod- 12, passes between the coil and rod. Preferably the rod 12 is formed of iron. The coil 14 is connected with a source of high frequency'current for inducing an electric current in the rod 12 which causes heating thereof. As the tube 24 is formed, wet solution collects at 58 and the heat from the rod 12 thickens the solution which readily adheres to the tube as the strands 22 are braided. The heated rod dries the tube 24 from the interior thereof as the tube passes upwardly over the rod. The portion of the rod I2 which extends above the opening 30 is of sufficient length to cause thorough drying of the tube.

I have found that the most resilient tube can be made by distributing the heat more evenly and in a preferred embodiment, instead of supplying relatively intense heat at one place, I lessen the intensity of the heat at this place and supply the requisiteadditional heat at other places. Thus, in the embodiment illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6, heat is applied to the outside of the tube 24 by a cylindrical heater 6| formed of copper wire gauze 62, which gauze is mounted on brackets 63 and surrounds the tube 24 in the same manner as the shield 60. The gauze 82 is heated by suitable electric heaters 64 attached to the gauze. By providing the heater 8! for drying the exterior of the tube 24, the temperature of the air discharged through the nozzle 54 need not be as high as in'the embodiment shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3. The heater 6| may also be used for drying the exterior of the tube. 24 when the interior of the tube is heated by the heater 10. In this event the intensity of the heat of the heater 10 may be reduced.

By my method and apparatus a wet solution of material adapted to adhere to the strands forming the tube may be applied to thoroughly coat the strands and the solution is quickly dried so that the tube may be immediately compressed for storage on spools or the like.

The present invention is particularly useful in the manufacture of tubing or flat weave or braid formed of glass or other relatively inert threads. By applying a material such as latex to the threads,

the flexibility, elasticity and re- 'ferred forms,

slliency of the tube are materially increased and the tube attains the characteristics of a product made of organic matter such as one formed of cotton or woolen threads.

While the forms of embodiments of the present invention. as herein disclosed constitute preit is to be understood that other forms might be adopted, all coming within the scope of the claims which follow.

I claim:

1. In the manufacture of cloth in tube-like form, those steps in the process which consists in subjecting the strands, which form the tube, to a wet solution including a substance adapted to-adhere to the material of the strands, then applying heat to the tube while the tube is in a relatively dormant atmosphere and then applying heated moving air to the tube.

\, 2. In the manufacture of cloth in tube-like form, those steps in the process which consists in subjecting the strands, which form the tube, to a wet solution including'a substance adapted to adhere to the material of the strands, then applying heat to the tube from the interior thereof while the tube is in a relatively dormant atmosphere and then applying heated moving air to the tube.

3. In the manufacture of cloth in tube-like form, those steps in the process which consist in subjecting the strands, which form the tube, to a wet solution including a substance adapted to adhere to the material of the strands, then applying heat to the tube while the tube is in a relatively dormant atmosphere and then applying heated moving air to the tube from the interior thereof.

-i. In the manufacture of cloth in tube-like form, those steps in the process which consists in subjecting the strands, which form the tube, to a wet solution including a substance adapted to adhere to the material of the strands, then applying heat to the tube from the interior thereof while the tube is in a relatively dormant atmosphere and then applying heated moving air to the tube from the interior thereof.

5. In the manufacture of cloth in tube-like form, those steps in the process which consist in subjecting individual strands to a wet solution including a substance adapted to adhere to the material of the strands, then subjecting the entwined strands to a like solution, then applying heat to the tube while the tube is in a relatively dormant atmosphere and then applying heated moving air to the tube.

6. In the manufacture of cloth in tube-like form, those steps in the process which consist in subjecting individual strands to a wet solution including a substance adapted to adhere to the material of the strands, then subjecting the entwined strands to a like solution and then drying the tube from the interior thereof outwardly.

7. In the manufacture of cloth in tube-like form, those steps in the process which consist in subjecting individual strands to a wet solution including a substance adapted to adhere to the material of the strands, then subjecting the entwined strands to a like solution, then applying heat to the tube from the interior thereof while the tube is in a relatively dormant atmosphere and then applying heated moving air to the tube.

8. In the manufacture of cloth in tube-like form, those steps in the process which consist in subjecting individual strands to a wet solution including a substance adapted to adhere to the material of the strands, then subjecting the entwined strands to a like solution, then applying heat to the tube from the interior thereof while the tube is in a relatively dormant atmosphere and then applying heated moving air to the tube from the interior thereof.

9. In the manufacture of cloth in tube-like form, those steps in the process which consist in subjecting individual strands to a wet solution including a substance adapted to adhere to the material of the strands, then subjecting the entwined strands to a partially dried, like solution while the strands are being entwined to form the tube; and then drying the tube.

10. In combination with a machine for making cloth in tube-like form; means for supplying a wet solution to the strands while the tube is being formed; heating means disposed adjacent the forming end of the tube; and means beyond the forming end of the tube for applying heat to the tube.

11. In combination with a machine for making cloth in tube-like form; .means for supplying a wet solution to the strands while the tube is being formed; heating means within the tube disposed adjacent the forming end of the tube; and means beyond the forming end of the tube for applying heat to the tube.

12. In combination with a machine for making cloth in tube-like form; means for supplying a wet solution to the strands while the tube is being formed; heating means disposed adjacent the forming end of the tube; and means beyond the forming end of the tube and within the tube for applying heat to the tube.

13. In combination with a machine for making cloth in tube-like form; means for supplying a wet solution to the strands while the tube is being formed; a hollow element within the tube disposed adjacent the forming end of the tube; and means for supplying heated fluid to the element in the direction 01' movement of the tube.

14. In the manufacture of cloth in tube-like form, those steps in the process which consist in subjecting the strands, which form the tube, to a wet solution including a substance adapted to adhere to the material of the strands and then applying heat to the tube from the interior and exterior thereof.

15. An article of manufacture comprising a resilient and pervious tube formed of entwined glass strands, and each strand having a coat of dried elastic material.

16. An article of manufacture comprising a re silient and pervious tubularly shaped element formed of entwined strands, said strands being formed of glass, and each having asubstantially individual coat of dried resilient material.

17. The process of manufacturing a resilient and elastic tube from glass strands, which consists in coating the strands with a wet solution containing a substance, which when dried forms a resilient body and which adheres to the strands, then entwining the strands for forming a tube, and then drying the wet solution on the strands by forcing a dryin fluid through the walls of r the tube. 18. The process of manufacturing a pervious, resilient and elastic tube like member from glass strands, which consists in coating the strands which form the tube with a wet solution including a substance which forms a resilient body when dry and which is adapted to adhere to and to form individual coatings for each of the strands, and then drying the solution while the entwined strands are in tubular form.

19. The process of manufacturing a pervious; resilient and elastic tube like member from glass strands, which consists in coating the strands which form the tube with a wet solution including a substance which forms a resilient body when dry and which is adapted to adhere to and to form individual coatings for each of the strands, and then drying the strands forming the tube by forcing a drying medium through the interstices of the tube.

20. The process of manufacturing a pervious, resilient and elastic tube like member from glass strands, which consists in coating the strands which form the tube with a wet solution including a substance which forms a resilient body when dry and which is adapted to adhere to and to form individual coatings for each of the strands, and then drying the strands forming the tube by forcing a drying medium axially into the tube and outwardly through the interstices of the tube.

GEORGE A. STONE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2557343 *Aug 19, 1948Jun 19, 1951Sackner Prod IncPacking cord, beading cord, edge roll, or the like
US2685813 *Sep 18, 1951Aug 10, 1954Northrop Aircraft IncPrefabricated glass fiber rivet body
US2983182 *Jul 17, 1957May 9, 1961Shobert Samuel MApparatus for fabricating reinforced plastic tubing
US3195395 *Feb 1, 1963Jul 20, 1965Ohio Commw Eng CoFiber metallizing apparatus and method for making shielded electrical conductors
US3653295 *Apr 30, 1970Apr 4, 1972Johns ManvilleMethod of providing a lubricant to braided cord
US4524094 *Apr 19, 1984Jun 18, 1985Prototech CompanySelf-supporting catalytic sleeve formed of interwoven loosely packed multi-fiber strands for receiving air-combustible gas mixtures for flameless catalytic combustion along the sleeve
US4947149 *Sep 27, 1989Aug 7, 1990Gould, Inc.Electrical fuse with improved casing
US4976812 *Dec 4, 1989Dec 11, 1990E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyHeating fiber reinforced thermoplastic resin strands
US5127307 *Apr 17, 1990Jul 7, 1992Gould Inc.Method of manufacture of articles employing tubular braids and resin applicator used therein
US5320696 *Oct 31, 1990Jun 14, 1994E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyIn-line consolidation of braided structures
EP0420654A2 *Sep 27, 1990Apr 3, 1991Gould Inc.Method of manufacture of articles employing tubular braids and resin applicator used therein
Classifications
U.S. Classification87/1, 57/251, 57/249, 87/23, 57/248, 156/180, 57/297
International ClassificationD03D37/00
Cooperative ClassificationD03D37/00, D03D2700/16
European ClassificationD03D37/00