Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2344369 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1944
Filing dateFeb 14, 1942
Priority dateFeb 14, 1942
Publication numberUS 2344369 A, US 2344369A, US-A-2344369, US2344369 A, US2344369A
InventorsSalfisberg Leroy L
Original AssigneeIvers Lee Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package
US 2344369 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 14, 1944.- L 1 SALFISBERG PACKAGE Filed Feb. 14, 1942v Patented Mar. 14, 1944 T oEFicE PACKAGE Leroy L. Salsberg,

South Orange, N. .Lassisnor to Ivers-Lee Company, Newark, N. J., a corporation of Delaware Application February 14, 1942, Serial No. 430,893

Claims.

This invention relates in general to bag-like packages whose walls are formed of thin flexible material, for example Cellophane, Pliofllm, metal foil and the like, and more particularly the invention contemplates a package of the type wherein walls are sealed together to form a commodity receiving pocket between them which has a mouth between the juxtaposed edges ofcertain marginal portions of the walls for insertion of a commodity, such as powder, into the compartment.

Considerable diilculty is encountered in lling packages of this character. particularly because the thin edge portions of thewalls in the mouth of the package are hard to separate for the lling operation and the edge portions of the walls easily bend or collapse if they are accidentally abutted by for example a lling nozzle, so that either the packages are destroyed or are only partially filled and much of the commodity is wated.

Furthermore, the walls of known packages of this type are relatively easily punctured or torn. It, is also di-ilicult and expensive to apply labels to such packages, particularly when they are l formed of materials such as Cellophane or Pliolm.

Therefore, one object of my invention is to provide a package of this general character which shall embody novel and improved features of construction whereby the edge portions of the walls at the mouth of the package easily and quickly can be separated for lling of the package and shall be resistant to tearing or collapse under pressure or blows applied to said edge portions. Another object is to provide such a. package wherein the Walls shall be strong and resistant to tearing or puncture.

Further objects are to provide a novel and improved construction and combination of a package and a label wherein the label cn. be easily and quickly applied to the package, and more particularly to provide a package thatshall have a wall formed of two layers of packaging material, at least the outer of which shall be transparent, with the label interposed between said layers and visible through and protected by the outer layer. In many cases, particularly where the package is to be used for pharmaceutical powders or the like, it is desirable that the contents of the package be heat-insulated, or be protected against evaporation of moisture therefrom or absorption of moisture through the package from thel atmosphere, and accordingly another object of my invention is to provide a package the walls of which shall be constructed in a novel and improved manner to impede the"passage of heat and moisture therethrough.v

Other` objects, advantages and results of the invention will appear from the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawing in which Figure 1 is a front elevational view of a package constructed in accordance with my invention,

showingthe package in nlled and open condition.

Figure 2 is a transverse vertical sectionalview on the line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary sectional perspective view showing the package closed.

Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 2 showing a modification of the package.

- Figure 5 is a similar view showing another form of the package.

Figure 6 is a perspective View of the two folded and unconnected sheets that form the package shown in Figure 5. Figure 7 is a transverse vertical sectional view through another form of the package.

Figure 8 is a perspective view of the sheet of packaging material folded preliminarily to sealing the walls together for forming the commodity receiving compartment, as shown in Figure 7.

Figure 9 is a view similar to Figure 7 showing a further modication of the package.

Figure 10 is a view similar to Figure 8 showing the packaging material as used in forming the package illustrated in Figure 9.

Figure 1l is a transverse vertical sectional view through still another form of the package and Figure 12 is a view like Figure 8, showing the packaging material preliminarily folded for forming the package of Figure 11.

In its broader aspects my invention contemplates a package comprising spaced-opposed walls of packaging material sealed together in said zones to form a commodity receiving compartment between them and a mouth for said compartment between the edges of juxtaposed marginal portions or' said walls, at least one of the walls including two approximately co-extensive layers of packaging material sealed in said zones to each other and to the other wall and joined together along the edge of the corresponding said marginal portion at the mouth of the compartment sothat said edge shall be relatively thick and constitute a lip that is easily separable from the corresponding edge of the other wall for opening the mouth of the package.

In Figures 1 to 3 inclusive the package is shown as comprising a single strip of packaging material, for example thin exible Cellophane, "Pliofilm or metal foil, said strip having its end portions I and 2 folded inwardly upon itself as at 3. The strip also is folded intermediate the extremities of inturned edge portions as at 4 so as to form two opposed walls A and B for the package each of which comprises two layers of the packaging material connected by the respective integral folds 3. The strip is folded at 4 so that the folds 3 are brought into juxtaposition, each fold 3 forming one edge of the corresponding wall A or B. The longitudinal marginal portions of the walls are sealed together as at 5, while the transverse marginal portions of the walls at the fold 4 are sealed together as at 6 so as to form a commodity receiving compartment C between the walls and a mouth D for the compartment between the free or unsealed folded edge portions 3.

Preferably the contacting surfaces of the walls A and B will have a thermoplastic coating which under heat and pressure, will form an adhesive for connecting the walls together, although the walls may be connected in other Ways as by other adhesives, and where the packaging material is Pliolm," the material itself will become fused under heat and pressure solas to adhesively connect the contacting portions of the walls.

With this construction, it will be seen that the folded edge yportions-3 are relatively thick so that they may easily be separated for filling of the compartment C and the edges will be relatively stiff and strong so as to resist tearing or collapse, for example upon accidental abutment of the edges with other objects such as a lling spout. Also the walls will be strong and resistant to puncture due to the double layers of thepackaging material. v

Preferably the outer layer of at least one ofv the walls is formed of transparent material and a label E of paper or the like is inserted between said layer and the corresponding layer of the same wall as shown in Figure 2, so that the label is visible through the outer layer and protected thereby. Where the strip of packaging material is Cellophane or Pliolm the outerlayer of both walls is bound to be transparent. The label preferably is secured between the layers at and by the sealed zones 5 and 6, although such positive attachment of the label to the packaging material is unnecessary to retain the label in position.

After the package has been iilled in the usual way, the mouth is sealed by pressing together the edge portions 3 as indicated at 1 in Figure 3.

Where it is desired to prevent passage of moisture through the walls of the package, the package will be formed or substantially gas-impervious and liquid-impervious material and the two layers of the walls will be sealed together in such a manner as to form an air-tight chamber 8 between the layers as shown in Figure 4, and a gas, for example air, may be entrapped within said chamber to insulate the walls. It will be understood also that where a suitable gas such as air is utilized the walls will be rendered heat resistant as well as air and moisture resist-ant.

The walls of the package may be formed in various ways, particularly by folding one or more sheets of packaging material in different ways. In Figures 5 and 6 the package is shown as comprising two sheets of packaging material each of which is folded upon itself at 9, and the sheets are sealed together for example in the manner hereinbefore described to form a commodity receivlng compartment between them and a mouth for the compartment between the folded edes l, whereby each sheet forms one wall of the package and comprises two layers of packaging material.

In Figures 7 and 8 a single sheet of packaging material has one end portion III folded inwardly as at II to `form one wall of the package including two layers of the material, and the other end portion I2 folded into juxtaposition thereto as at I3 to form the other wall. The two walls are sealed together in the same manner above described so that the fold II forms one edge of one wall and the free edge of the end portion I2 forms the edge of the other wall which between them provide the mouth for the commodity receiving compartment.

Figures 9 and 10 illustrate a package wherein a strip of packaging material is folded intermediateits ends at I4 and has its end portions Ii folded outwardly in opposite directions at I8 to form a plurality of super-posed layers which are sealed together, for example. inthe manner above described to form a commodity receiving compartment F between two walls G and H, each of which includes two layers of the packaging material.

In Figures 11 and 12 is shown another form of the package wherein a strip of packaging material is foldedintermediate its ends at I1 and has one end portion folded inwardly at I8 and the other end portion folded outwardly at I9, the endy portion I8 and the juxtaposed main portion of the sheet forming two layers of one wall and the end portion I9 and the juxtaposed main portion of the sheet forming the two layers of the other walls, the layers of the respective walls being integrally connected by the folds 20. The two walls are sealed together in any suitable manner to form a commodity receiving compartment I between them, the mouth of which is formed between the folded edge portions 2| of the walls.

Other modifications in the details of structure of the package will occur to those skilled in the art as within the scope and spirit of the invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

l. A bag comprising spaced opposed walls of packaging material sealed together in certain zones to form a commodity receiving compartment between them and an open mouth for said compartment between the edges of juxtaposed marginal portions of said walls, at least one of said walls including a sheet of packaging material folded upon itself to form two juxtaposed approximately co-extensive layers with the fold connecting said layers forming a relatively thick lip at the edge of the corresponding said marginal portion at said mouth, said layers being sealed together and to .the other wall in said zones.

2. A bag comprising spaced opposed walls of packaging material sealed together in certain zones to form a commodity receiving compartment between them and a mouth for said compartment between the edges of juxtaposed marginal portions of said walls, 'each wall including two layers approximately co-extensive of packaging material sealed in said zones to each other and to the other wall and connected by an integral fold which constitutes the edge of the cor.. responding wall at said mouth and forms a relatively thick lip.

3. A bag comprising a sheet of thin exible packaging material folded upon itself to form two spaced opposed walls at least one of which includes two approximately co-extensive layers of said material connected by an integral fold which forms an edge of said wall, said walls being sealed together to form a commodity receiving compartment between them and a mouth for said compartment between said folded edge of one Wall and the corresponding edge of the other wall, so that said folded edge constitutes a relatively thick lip for said mouth.

4. A bag comprising a sheet of thin flexible packaging material folded upon itself to form two spaced opposed walls each of which includes two approximately coextensive layers of said material connected by an integral fold which forms an edge of said wall, said walls being sealed together to form a commodity receiving compartment between them having a mouth between said folded edges of said walls so that said edges constitute a rim and relatively thick lips for the mouth.

integral fold which forms one edge of the wall and is juxtaposed to one edge of the other wall, the other edge portions of all of said layers being sealed together to form a commodity receiving compartment between said walls, and said folded edge of the f irst-mentioned wall and the corresponding edge of the other wall being unsealed and forming between them a mouth for said compartment, said folded edge constituting a relatively thick lip for said mouth.

8. A bag comprising spaced opposed Walls of packaging material sealed together in certain zones to forma commodity receiving compartment between them and an-open mouth for said compartment between the edges of juxtaposed marginal portions of said walls, at least one of said y walls including two approximately coextensive 5. A bag comprising a rectangular sheet of thin flexible material folded into two approximately coextensive' layers forming a wall one of whose edges is said fold, said sheet also being folded into juxtaposition to said Wall to form another wall, all of said layers being sealed together in certain zones to form a commodity receiving compartment between said walls having a mouth between said folded edge of the first wall and the corresponding edge of the other wall, so that said folded edge forms arelatively thick lip for said mouth. t

6. A bag comprising two sheets of thin flexible packaging material, each folded upon itself to form two approximately coextensive juxtaposed layers connected by an integral fold, said folded sheets being arranged in opposed relation to each other with said folds in juxtaposition, and all of said layers being sealed together to form a commodity receiving compartment between said two sheets and a mouth for said compartment between said folds, so that said folds form relatively thick lips for said mouth.

7. .A bag comprising spaced opposed walls formed of rectangular layers of packaging material, at least one wall including a plurality of approximately coextensive layers connected by an layers of packaging material sealed in said zones to each other and to the other wall and said layers being joined together along the edge of the corresponding said marginal portion at the mouth of said compartment to form a relatively thick lip.

9. A bag comprising spaced opposed walls of packaging material sealed together in certain zones to form a commodity receiving compartment betweenthem and an open mouth for said compartment between the edges of juxtaposed marginal portions of said Walls, at least one of said walls including two approximately coextensive layers of packaging material sealed in said zones to each other and to the other wall and integrally connected by a fold which constitutes the edge of the corresponding said marginal portion at said mouth and forms a relatively thick lip.

10. A bag comprising spaced opposed walls of packaging materiaLsealed together in certain zones to form a commodity receiving compartment between them and a mouth for said compartment between the edges of juxtaposed marginal portions of said walls, at least one wall including a sheet of thin exible packaging material folded upon itself into layers With a fold constituting the edge of said wall at said mouth and forming a relatively thick lip, said layers being sealed together and to the other said wall in said zones.

LEROY L. SALFISBERG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2442091 *May 18, 1946May 25, 1948Breslee Mfg CompanyPouch and method of making the same
US2474035 *Dec 26, 1944Jun 21, 1949American Optical CorpMethod and apparatus for making containers
US2489034 *Jul 8, 1946Nov 22, 1949Huye Space Saving Box System ICombined box handle and partition
US2496753 *Feb 6, 1946Feb 7, 1950Ivers Lee CoMethod of making rectangular flat bags
US2536773 *Jan 19, 1950Jan 2, 1951Saidel Willard MSelf-sealing container of laminated plastic sheet material
US2538920 *Nov 18, 1946Jan 23, 1951Shumann Harold FDisplay bag and method of making the same
US2572056 *Sep 14, 1946Oct 23, 1951Ivers Lee CoLabeled package
US2576322 *Jul 5, 1947Nov 27, 1951Waters Harry FBag with vacuum sealed valve closure
US2582346 *Mar 29, 1946Jan 15, 1952Mullinix Charles DCooky bag
US2584632 *Nov 9, 1945Feb 5, 1952Shellmar Products CorpMethod of making containers
US2614349 *Jun 17, 1948Oct 21, 1952Bemis Bro Bag CoDetachable-label bag
US2628013 *Jun 2, 1948Feb 10, 1953Clarence W VogtArticle for packaging materials
US2655156 *Aug 24, 1951Oct 13, 1953Boyce H CaldwellBanker's note and collateral indexing file
US2672981 *Sep 8, 1947Mar 23, 1954Sutherland Paper CoPackage of stacked receptacles
US2718105 *Dec 31, 1948Sep 20, 1955J L Ferguson CompanyBag-like containers of flexible strip material, process of making same, process of filling same, and apparatus for accomplishing these purposes
US2721691 *Sep 17, 1953Oct 25, 1955Sydney Thomas CorpBags with multiply walls and method of manufacture
US2756154 *Oct 7, 1952Jul 24, 1956Standard Packaging CorpFood package
US2783599 *Apr 7, 1953Mar 5, 1957Gen Films IncMethod of packaging
US2793120 *Jan 8, 1953May 21, 1957Lipton Inc Thomas JTea bag
US2793743 *Apr 12, 1955May 28, 1957Ivers Lee CoSealed package
US2800269 *Mar 9, 1954Jul 23, 1957Milprint IncValved bag
US2803365 *Nov 18, 1952Aug 20, 1957Disposable Bottle CorpNursing unit
US2817124 *Feb 8, 1956Dec 24, 1957Gen Motors CorpRefrigeration apparatus
US2819834 *Jul 13, 1955Jan 14, 1958Bemis Bros Bag CompanyBag
US2925171 *Oct 13, 1958Feb 16, 1960Pneumatic Scale CorpInfusion bag and method of making the same
US2985552 *Aug 10, 1959May 23, 1961Watanabe Shoji LuckyThermal insulating unit for faucets
US3069303 *Feb 5, 1960Dec 18, 1962Scholle Chemical CorpProcess and apparatus for producing flexible containers
US3269278 *Apr 16, 1962Aug 30, 1966Crown Zellerbach CorpMulti-ply pouch manufacturing
US3638784 *Jun 4, 1970Feb 1, 1972William A BodolayTwo compartment unitary bag
US3734394 *Aug 12, 1971May 22, 1973Milprint IncFlexible package with double layered walls
US3762628 *May 17, 1971Oct 2, 1973Ppg Industries IncCoupon-confining bag, method and apparatus
US3844409 *Nov 27, 1972Oct 29, 1974W BodolayTwo compartment unitary bag having shelf
US4149667 *Apr 26, 1978Apr 17, 1979The Smead Manufacturing CompanyDual compartment envelope
US4172152 *Aug 12, 1977Oct 23, 1979Carlisle Richard SThermally insulative beverage container
US4192447 *May 1, 1978Mar 11, 1980Victor Envelope CompanyMulti-compartment envelope
US4323586 *Oct 20, 1980Apr 6, 1982Ludlow CorporationThermally-processable flexible package and process for using same
US4484350 *Aug 26, 1983Nov 20, 1984Gordon Kenneth NConvertible paper bag and doily
US4638913 *Aug 21, 1981Jan 27, 1987W. R. Grace & Co., Cryovac Div.Multiply package having delaminating easy open seal
US4679688 *Sep 12, 1984Jul 14, 1987Soederholm JanPackage for risk samples
US4734292 *Sep 30, 1986Mar 29, 1988Crescent Holding, N.V.Method of forming vacuum package with smooth appearance
US4832188 *Oct 15, 1985May 23, 1989Christie Eugene PFlexible film package for carry-out meal items
US4968624 *Apr 25, 1989Nov 6, 1990Baxter International Inc.Large volume flexible containers
US4991980 *Aug 8, 1989Feb 12, 1991Bagcraft Corporation Of AmericaBag with auxiliary pocket and viewing window
US5056930 *Mar 5, 1991Oct 15, 1991Hargro Lamcote, Inc.Self-sealing specimen pouch assembly
US5487826 *Jan 14, 1994Jan 30, 1996International Envelope Company, Inc.Cardboard mailer packages
US5778110 *Apr 23, 1996Jul 7, 1998Furuya; KyokoTwo-layered storage bag and two-layered storage bag attached to a diaper
US6258424May 14, 1998Jul 10, 2001Wolfgang OswaldPackaging and process for its production
US6457863 *May 30, 2000Oct 1, 2002Angelo VassalloFlexible self-closing container
US6575627 *Oct 9, 2001Jun 10, 2003David C. HusemanSelectively closeable plastic film bag structure
US7140491 *Feb 20, 2004Nov 28, 2006Tg Tools United CompanyPackaging for grouped similar items, including elongated items such as drill bits and the like
US7204368 *Dec 29, 2003Apr 17, 2007Cheaure Sarah FResealable package
EP1038788A2 *Feb 4, 2000Sep 27, 2000Warner-Lambert CompanyComposition and manufacture of topical pharmaceutical and cosmetic semi-solid post-foaming dosage forms in a pouch
WO1989004279A1 *Nov 10, 1988May 18, 1989Dittler Brothers IncPackage having a built-in promotional piece
WO1998051585A1 *May 14, 1998Nov 19, 19981St Components Software GmbhPackaging and method for producing the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/109, 383/38, 383/105, 383/106, 206/527
International ClassificationB65D30/08
Cooperative ClassificationB65D31/04
European ClassificationB65D31/04