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Publication numberUS2344706 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 21, 1944
Filing dateFeb 28, 1940
Priority dateFeb 28, 1940
Publication numberUS 2344706 A, US 2344706A, US-A-2344706, US2344706 A, US2344706A
InventorsAndrew A Kucher
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerating apparatus
US 2344706 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 21, 1944. A. A. KUCHER Filed Feb. 28, 1940 4- Sheets-Sheet 2 March 21, 1944. A, AJKUCHER 2,344,706

REFRIGERATING YAPPARATUS Filed Feb. 28, 1940 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 52 6 a INVENTOR.

. A TTORNEYS March 21, 1944. A uc 2,344,706

REPRIGERAT AAAAAAAAAA US Patented Mar. 21, 1944 f UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE REFRIGERATING APPARATUS ndrew A. Kucher, Dayton, Ohio, assignor to General Motors Corporation, Dayton, Ohio, a

corporation of Delaware w 7 Application February28, 1940, Serial No. 321,269

9 Claims. (Cl. 257-3) system for use in air conditioning systems.

One object of this invention is to provide a portable air conditioning unit which comprises a plurality of individual sections which may be readily assembled as a unit at the point of use.

An object of this invention is to provide a new and improved apparatus for conditioning the alt for private homes and the like.

Another object of is invention is to provide an improved arrangement for distributing the conditioned air to a plurality of separate rooms.

Still another object of my invention is to prolike, it is to beunderstood that several of the features of my invention are of general application. In the particular embodiment shown, the

' as to be assembled'at the point of use.

air conditioning unit generally designated by the reference character I comprises a plurality of sections i2, i4, I6 and i8 whichare so designed Asbest shown in Fig. 3, thesection i2v comprises a refrigerant evaporator-20, a water-cooled motor-compressor-condenser unit 22 and a casing member 24 which forms one portion of the exterior casing of the completed unit. The casing member 24 supports the entire volatile refrigerant system including the evaporator 20, the water-cooled vide an air conditioning system having improved l motor-compressor-condenser n t th ed a n al g wr restrictor 2|, and all the connecting refrigerant Still another object of this invention is to prolmes- These units; Will be P d Out herevide a new combination of elements which makes n fter, are of light weight com c design it possible t use t refrigerating system a whereby that portion of the system which is supgreater portion of t year ported by the casing section 24 is of relatively j-tioning apparatus. Further objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, wherein a preferred form of the present invention is clearly shown.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a top view of the air conditioning apparatus with parts broken away so as to show ..-the arrangement of the elements within the cabinet;

Fig. 2 is an elevational view of the same with parts broken away;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view showing the sectional unit which supports the volatile refrigerating system; l Fig. 4 is a perspective view showing another sectional unit which supports the water coil and the air filter; t

Fig. 5 is a perspective view showing the blower unit;

Fig. 6 is trols;'

Fig. 7 is a view-partly in elevation and partly a diagrammatic view showing the conlight weight and small in size so that it may be carried upand down stairways and, it necessary, passed through relatively small windows or other openings. 7

. As shown in Figni section i4 comprises an outer shell 26 which supports a water coil 28. As

' shown in Figs. 1 and 2 a filter element 32 is also in section showing the arrangement of thefair carried by the section 14 and is disposed between the louvered air inlet opening and the water cofl Z8.

The sections I2 and 14 rest on thebase sections it and i8 which are designed so as to deaden the noises produced by the compressor and the blower mechanism. The blower 34 and the blower motor 36 are removably supported on the section l6 and may be transported separately from the section J6. The sections l6 and I8 are lined with sounddeadening material 38 so as to absorb noises produced by the mechanical parts of the system and noises produced by the air flowing through the unit. By virtue of the above described arrangement, each of the sections i2, l4, l6 and I8 may be separately carried to the point of use and may 1 be assembled at the point of use with very little difliculty. A pair of cover members 40 serve to enclose. the upper side of the sections l2 and I4 and also assist in holding the sections i2 and I4 in proper relationship. Any convenient means within the attic space or the like of a private for conditioning air ior private homes and the 55 home. The air to be conditioned is admitted to the attic space from the outside through one of ing 30 and then thermal exchange relationship with the waterthe attic windows or any conventional air inlet leading to the attic. The air is first caused to enter the air conditioning unit through the openpasses through the filter 32 into coil 28 and the evaporator 20. The air thus cooled is then picked up by the blower 34 and is discharged into the sound-deadening section Hi from whence it flows into section l8 through the openings 42 and 44 located at opposite ends of the baiiie 45 of the section l6. Rather than providing special air ducts for distributing the conditioned air to the various rooms, the hallways, stairways, door openings, windows and, in some cases, booster fans are relied onto distribute the conditioned air. The conditioned air leaving the chamber l8 discharges downwardly through an opening 46 which is in registry with the passage 48 leading to an air distributing grille arrangement 50 preferably secured to the first or second floor hall ceiling depending upon the type of home being conditioned. As shown in Fig. 7 the air leaving the discharge grille 50 is caused to flow substantially horizontally along the ceiling until striking the side walls of the hall from whence the air sweeps downwardly in front of any doorways or other openings leading to rooms adjoinin the hallway. Inasmuch as this apparatus is designed for use in many different types of homes, no special arrangement/of hallways, rooms, etc., has been shown as this will be different in practically every home.

In order to obtain proper distribution of the air into the various rooms of the home the necessary doors and windows are left open so as to provide the necessary flow of air. It should be noted that this air conditioning system is designed primarily to condition fresh air only and therefore no means has been provided for returning the air from the rooms to the inlet of the conditioning unit. Under certain circumstances, however, it may be desirable to provide means for recirculating a portion of the air from the rooms. Any conventional means may be used for recirculating a portion of the air if desired.

In order to increase the usefulness of the volatile refrigerating system and the water coil, 9. novel control arrangement has been provided as shown in Fig. 6 whereby the refrigerating apparatus and the water coil may beused for either heating or cooling the incoming air as explained hereinafter.

In many localities there are certain times of the year when the temperature falls below that desired for comfort without becoming cold enough to require the operation of the usual winter heating system. At such times it is intended that the apparatus disclosed herein will serve to temper the air sumciently to produce-comfort.

The water temperature in most localities is sufliciently nearthe air temperature desired so that this water may be used for cooling hot outside air during the hot weather and it may likewise be used for increasing the temperature of cold outside air during the colder weather. So long as the water temperature is below the outside air temperature this water can be used in cooling the air. Likewise, so long as the water temperature is above the outside air temperature, this water may be used for imparting heat to the air.

The controls provided make it possible to utilize the water coil not only during the cooling cycle but also during the heating cycle.

from any suitable source such as the city water mains enters the unit through the line 52 which s to the branch lines 54 and 56, which M: 60 respectively. The branch lines 54 and 56 communicate with the line 62 leading to the three-way solenoid valve 64 which directs the incoming water either through the water coil 28 or the b'y-pass 66 around the water coil 28. The

The water leaving the coils I0 discharges into' the drain line 14 which may also serve to drain away the condensate collecting in the drip pans l6 and 18 (see Fig. 1). The drip pans are provided with drain pipes 80 and 82 whichmay be connected either to the drain 14 or to a separate drain.

The volatile refrigerant system which includes the heat exchanger 20, the fixed restrictor 2| and the motor-compressor-condenser unit 22 is designed so as to be capable of operation as a reverse cycle refrigerant system. By using a volatile refrigerant system in which the flow of refrigerant between the condenser and the evaporator are controlled by a fixed restrictor and in which the compressor is capable of operating in either direction so as to cause that heat exchange element which normally serves as an evaporator to serve as a condenser, it is possible to use a simple volatile refrigerant system for either cooling the air or heating the air. The fixed restrictor 2| may be of the type disclosed in the Kucher Patent 2,063,745, or of any other conventional fixed restrictor design. It is important, however, to use a fixed restrictor as distinguished from an expansion valve in which the flow of refrigerant through the valve is controlled by the therefrigerant circuit. The coils of the heat exchanger 2i]v are arranged so as to permit the refrigerantgcondensedtherein to drain into the line leading to the flxedrestrictor 2|. Inasmuch as this s'ys'tem is designed primarily for cooling the air, I have provided a. compressor which is so designed as to operate more efiiciently during the cooling cycle than during the heating cycle.

In the ordinary four-vane compressor, a considerable sacrifice in efllciency results when the inlet port and the outlet port are of equal circumferential extent. As shown in Fig. 8, the compressor comprises a conventional four-vane rotor 84 which operates within the pumping cylinder 86. The rotor 84 is operated by the electric motor 81 having a stator 89 and a rotor 90 located within the hermetically sealed casing 12. During the cooling cycle, when the heat exchange coil 20 serves as an evaporator, the port 92 serves as the inlet port and the port 94 serves as the outlet port. During the heating cycle the port 94 serves as the inlet port and the-port 92 serves as Water the outlet port. An auxiliary port 96 having a vided with the pressure actuated valves reed-type valve 98 is provided as an excess pressure relief means during the starting of the compressor for the cooling cycle. 7

The direction of rotation of the motor 90 and consequently the direction of rotation of the fourvane rotary pump element 84 is controlled by a thermostat I00. Any conventional motor which is capable of operating in either direction may be used. Inasmuch as motors of this type are well known in the art, the specific details of the motor have not been described in detail. This instrument may be located so as to respond either to the outside temperature or the inside temperature. The bulb I is connected to the bellows I02 which actuates the motor reversing switch mechanism I04 and the switch I06. The switches I04 and I06 are shown in the position calling for cooling. f

Inasmuch as there may be times when neither heating nor cooling is required, a separate thermostat I08 is provided which turns on and off the entire system. This element I08 may be located.

eitherinside or outside, preferably inside, however.

In order to control the three-way valve 64 which controls the flow of water through the water coil 28, I have provided a switch IIO which is operated by a pair of opposed bellows H2 and H4. The bellows H2 communicates with the thermostatic bulb H6 filled with a volatile fluid and placed so as to respond to the temperature condition of the incoming air. The bellows H4 is controlled by a similar thermostat bulb H8 which is responsive. to the temperature of the incoming water.

With the switch I06 in the position shown, the solenoid valve 64 will be energized when a circuit is closed between the contact I20 and the contact I22. The contact I20 engages the contact I22 whenever the temperature of the incoming water is high and the temperature of the incoming air is low. By virtue of this arrangement,

when cooling is desired the water is caused to by-pass the coil 28 at such times when the water temperature is high and the incoming air temperature is low, under which conditions the water would be of no assistance in cooling the air.

Whenever the air conditions cause the switch I to move to the opposite position from that shown in Fig. 6, the solenoid valve 64 is energized only when tne contact I20 is in engagement with the contact I24. By virtue of the arrangement described hereinabove, the circuit between I20 and I24 is closed only at such times when the temperature of the outside air is high and the temperature of the incoming water is low. The purpose of this arrangement is to avoid contacting a stream of relatively warm air with water at" a lower temperature when heating is required;

The amount of water flowing through the water line 62 and consequently the coil 28 or by-pass 6t and the water condensing coil I0 is under control of the pressure responsive valves 58 and 60. These valves respond:to the refrigerant pressure within the refrigerant system. The valve responds to the pressure in a line leading from the fixed restrictor II to the heat exchange coil 20, whereas the valve58 responds to the pressure in the line leading from the condensing cavity II and the restrictor 2|. These valves are designed to open wider as the pressure within the refrigerant system increases. By virtue of the be closed. The valve 58, however, will respond to the pressure in the line leading from the condensing chamber II to the fixed restrictor 2| which corresponds to the condenser pressure. Consequently, as the condensing pressure increases, the valve 58 will admit more water through the water lines. As the cycle reverses and the volatile refrigerant system is used for heating the air, the pressure in line 59 becomes low and the valve 58 closes, whereas the pressure in line (H will correspond to the condenser pressure with the result that the valve 60 will be open an amount corresponding to the condenser pressure.

In order to simplify the disclosure, only conventional dry bulb control instruments have been shown. It is within the purview of this invention, however, to use other types of controls such as wet bulb, humidity or eifective temperature controls.

While the form of embodiment of the invention as herein disclosed, constitutes a preferred form, it is to be understood that other forms might be adopted, all coming within the scope of the claims which follow.

What is claimed is as follows:

1. A conditioning unit of the type adapted to be used in conditioning air forprlvate homes and the like comprising in combination; a complete volatile refrigerant system; a water coil; thermostatic control means for controlling the operation of said refrigerant system; and means for controlling the flow of water through said water coil comprising a first means responsive to a, refrigerant pressure within said refrigerant system and a second means responsive to both the air temperature and the water temperature.

2. In combination, means for circulating a stream of air to be conditioned, a first heat exchange element in thermal exchange relationship withsaid stream, a second heat exchange element in thermal exchange relation with said stream, means for circulating a volatile refrigerant through said first heat exchange element, means for circulating water through said second heat exchange element when either heating or cooling of the air is required, means preventing. flow of water through said second heat exchange element when cooling is required and the water temperature is high and the incoming air temperature is low, and means preventing flow of water through said second heat exchange element when heating is required and the water temperaheat exchange units, a multiple vane rotary compressor' unit adapted for reversing the direction of flow of refrigerant through said heat exchange units said compressor comprising means formv ing a pumping chamber, a multiple vane rotor within said chamber, a motor for operating said rotor, means for reversing the direction of rotation of said motor, inlet and outlet ports in said first named means, one of said ports extending a greater circumferential distance than the other of said ports whereby said compressor has a greater displacement when operating in the one direction than when operating in the other direction.

, .4. .A portable air conditioning unit of the type adapted to be used in conditioning air for private homes and the like comprising in combination, a plurality of sectional elements adapted to be assembled as a unit at the point of use, two of said "sections comprising an air discharge means lined with sound-deadening material, another of said sections comprising a complete volatile refrigerant system supported on said air discharge means, and still another of said sections comprising a water coil supported on said air discharge means beside said volatile refrigerant system, said water coil section comprising an air inlet, said volatile refrigerant section comprising means for discharging the air downwardly into said air discharge means.

5. A portable air conditioning unit for conditioning air for private homes and the like comprising in combination, a cabinet, an air inlet in said cabinet, a water coil adjacent said inlet, a reverse cycle volatile refrigerant system mounted within said cabinet, means for forcibly flowing a stream of fresh air in thermal exchange relationship with said water coil and thereafter with a portion of said volatile refrigerant system, means for discharging the conditioned air into the space to be conditioned, means responsive to the outside air temperature for reversing the cycle, and means responsive to the inside air temperature for starting and stopping the operation of said volatile refrigerant system.

6. In combination; a pair of complementary heat exchange units; a multiple vane rotary compressor unit adapted for reversing the direction of flow of refrigerant through said heat exchange tioning fresh outside air for private homes and the like comprising in combination, a cabinet adapted to be mounted above the space to be conditioned, a volatile refrigerant system mounted within said cabinet and including a fixed restrictor and a reversible compressor for reversing the flow of refrigerant through said restrictor, means for forcibly flowing a stream of fresh air in thermal exchange relationship with a portion of said volatile refrigerant system, means for discharging the conditioned air downwardly into the space therebelow, and means for circulating a stream of water in thermal exchange relationship with incoming air and thereafter in thermal exchange relationship with refrigerant in said refrigerant system whereby said water first contacts said air and thereafter said refrigerant.

8. In combination, means for circulating a stream of air to be conditioned, a first heat exchange element in thermal exchange relationship with said stream, a second heat exchange I element in thermal exchange relationship with said stream, means for circulating a. volatile refrigerant through said first heat'exchange eleand the water temperature is low and the incoming air temperature is high.

9. A portable air conditioning unit of the type adapted to be used in conditioning air for private homes and the like comprising in combination, a plurality of sectional elements adapted to be assembled as a unit at the pointnof use, an air discharge means lined with sound-deadening material, another of saidsections comprising a complete volatile refrigerant system supported on said air discharge means, and still another of said sections comprising a water coil supported on said air discharge means beside said volatile refrigerant system, said water coil section comprising an air inlet, said volatile refrigerant section comprising means for discharging! the air downwardly into said air discharge means.

ANDREW A. KUCHER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2844945 *Sep 19, 1951Jul 29, 1958Muffly GlennReversible refrigerating systems
US3157129 *Jun 15, 1962Nov 17, 1964Dunham Bush IncRefrigeration system and flexible coupling for concentric shafts
US4043777 *Jun 30, 1976Aug 23, 1977Parren Joseph RAir handling system
US4501193 *Nov 29, 1982Feb 26, 1985Snyder General CorporationMounting curb for multiple unit air conditioning system
US6701739Jun 12, 2002Mar 9, 2004Tecumseh Products CompanyModular refrigeration system for refrigeration appliance
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/159, 62/259.1, 454/338, 62/181, 62/DIG.160, 165/48.1, 165/122, 165/62, 62/419, 454/309
International ClassificationF24F1/02
Cooperative ClassificationY10S62/16, F24F1/022
European ClassificationF24F1/02B