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Publication numberUS2345438 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1944
Filing dateJun 17, 1943
Priority dateJun 17, 1943
Publication numberUS 2345438 A, US 2345438A, US-A-2345438, US2345438 A, US2345438A
InventorsEdwin H Tompkins
Original AssigneeEdwin H Tompkins
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inner spring support
US 2345438 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 28, 1944. EA H TOMPKlNS 2,345,438

INNER SPRING SUPPORT Filed June 17, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet l March 28, 1944. E H. TOM|=K|N5 2,345,438

INNER SPR ING SUPPORT ,j y I IWI-:MOR l Q idw MW ATTOFKIEYS Patented Mar. 28, 1944 UNITED STATES FA''ENT OFFICE INNER SPRING SUPPOR'i` Edwin H. Tompkins, Buffalo, N. Y.

Application June 17, 1943, Serial No. 491,230

12 Claims.

This invention relates to inner spring supports for giving therapeutic treatments to a person resting thereon, and inner spring mattresses are an example of such supports.

It is intended that a person may comfortably rest, recline or sleep in the usual manner on such a mattress or support, and while so resting or supported, receive benecial oscillatory or gyratory action from mechanism contained within or attached to the mattress or support. Heretofore, it has been proposed to provide, entirely within an interior Zone of a mattress, a gyration creating element which is power operated and imparts to the mattress a gyratory motion of relatively high frequency and small amplitude in a small closed loop or circular path, and while such devices have been very successful and useful for imparting therapeutic treatments to persons resting thereon, they have not found sufcient favor with the re underwriters because of the diiiiculty in cooling and Ventilating such elements.

An object of this invention is to provide an improved inner spring support for giving therapeutic treatments, which will provide a comfortable support for a person resting thereon, throughout the entire surface area of the support; with which the power-operated element for imparting the gyratory motion to the support may be enclosed Within the normal limits of a mattress yet be easily accessible for servicing and fully vented for cooling; which will have maximum possible eiectiveness over its entire face area; which will be relatively simple, practical, efficient, durable and inexpensive; which will require a minimum of attention and servicing; and which will not objectionably change the appearance of the support or mattress.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved support or mattress of this type which may be flexed somewhat on transverse lines, as when used on hospital beds having end sections movable vertically, relatively to the middle section, and which may be use-d to give therapeutic treatments to persons resting thereon.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description of several embodiments of the invention, and the novel features Will be particularly pointed out hereinafter in connection with the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is a plan, on a reduced scale, of an inner spring mattress constructed in accordance with this invention, and illustrating one embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 2 is an end elevation of the same as viewed approximately on the line 2-2 of Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is a transverse, sectional elevation of the same on a larger scale, the section being taken approximately on the line 3 3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal sectional elevation of the same, with the section taken approximately along the line 4--4 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a plan, similar to Fig. l, of a portion of an inner spring mattress, also constructed in accordance with the invention, but having a modified connection between spaced rigid members within the mattress, so that the mattress may be exed to some extent about transverse lines between its ends;

Fig. 6 is a longitudinal, sectional elevation of a portion of the same. the section being taken approximately along the line 6-6 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a plan similar to Fig. 1 but illustrating still another embodiment of the invention, which also permits exing of the mattress about transverse lines intermediate the ends of the mattress;

Fig. 8 is a view partly in longitudinal section, of an element for creating the desired gyrations;

Fig. 9 is a similar View, but at right angles to the view of Fig. 8; and

Fig. l0 is a diagram illustrating the manner in which this element creates the gyratory movement.

Fig. ll is a fragmentary sectional elevation showing a modification of the device shown in Figs. 3 and 4.

In the embodiment of the invention illustrated in Figs. 1-4 the mattress is generally of the inner spring type, having a plurality of helical coil springs HJ of uniform size and length arranged side by side in parallel relation to one another, and secured together against displacement. In this example of the invention, these coil springs are enclosed in individual pockets Il of textile material, abutting pockets being secured together in any suitable manner. The faces of the mattress formed by the end faces of the springs, are covered with a resilient padding l 2, which extends over the aggregate end faces of the group of springs and around the end and side edge walls, so as to form a protecting envelope for the springs. This group of springs with the enclosing pad is placed under compression both lengthwise and sidewise, so as to press the springs together sidewise, and while so pressed, they are secured together against expansion in any suitable manner, a common construction in the manufacture of inner spring mattresses. This mattress has an enclosing textile casing I3 to provide a finished appearance, and opposite faces of the same may be connected by tufts as usual in mattresses of this type.

In accordance with this invention, such a mattress is modified such as by substituting for a small group of the springs at one end of the mattress during the manufacture of the mattress, a small box or housing I4 which may be elongated in shape and approximately square in transverse cross section. This housing contains means for creating gyratory movements, as will be explained hereinafter. Disposed within and crosswise of the mattress, between rows of coils, are two flat, ribbon-like bars I5 of rigid material, such as plastic or wood strips, or even metal strips. These members I5 preferably extend for nearly the full width of the mattress, are parallel, in planes normal to the faces of the mattress, and are disposed to engage the sides of the springs as shown in Fig. 4. One of these members 'I5 abuts against the housing I4 of the gyratory element and is firmly secured thereto, and the other bar or member I5 is arranged adjacent the opposite end of the mattress.A The members I5 are connected to each other at similar zones along their lengths by bars I6 which may be relatively thin, flat ribbon-like strips disposed with their broader faces vertical and normal to the main faces of the maty tress, as shown in Figs. 3 and 4. The ends of these members I6 may, for example, be reduced in width so as to provide tongues ita which extend through apertures in the members t5, and then the ends of the `tongues may be upset, so as to definitely connect the members I5 together at spaced zones along their length.

Referring now to Figs.,8 and 9, the construction of the. gyratory element will next be described. The housing Id, in the example shown, is a hollow box of rectangular cross section, both lengthwise and crosswise, and is provided with spaced apertures Il in the outside side wall thereof which forms part of the adjacent end edge wall of the mattress, see Figs. 2 and 8, by means of which apertures air may circulate through the interior of the housing. Within this housing is a small electric motor I8 whose crosswise dimensions are less than the dimensions across the chamber of the housing I 4, so that the motor will be entirely and materially spaced from the interior walls of the housing I. This motor, as shown, may be a small, cool running, electric motor having a relatively stationary part or frame, and an armature or rotor enclosed within the frame and whose shaft I9 extends at both ends beyond the enclosing or stationary part of the frame. A fan 2B is secured on each lend of the shaft i9 and the blades of both fans are arranged to move air in the same direction past the rotor when the rotor or armature is rotated.

The frame of the moto-r is provided with apertures in its end faces through which air may pass to remove heat from the interior of the motor, and since the housing is provided with apertures Il adjacent the housing ends, these two fans will blow air through the housing from end to end and through and around the motor so as to remove heat from the motor. Also fastened on both ends of the shaft IS are weights 2i which are adjustable towards and from the axis of rotation of the rotor, and also are placed in corresponding angular positions on the shaft i9 of the rotor; that is, they are alined with each other in a direction lengthwise of the shaft, so that they constitute `a denite mechanical axial unbalance on the shaft which is the same at both ends of the shaft. These weights are of the same size, and when disposed at the same distance from the axis of the shaft I9 and in the same or corresponding angular positions thereon, the unbalance will be the same at both ends of the rotor.

When this armature rotates about its axis. these weights ZI will exert a centrifugal force on the shaft or armature of the rotor, Awhich force moves about the axis of rotation. Referring to the diagram of Fig. 10, this action is illustrated schematically, and it will be noted that the weights 2| rotate about the axis of the shaft I9 in the direction of the arrow 22. The centrifugal force caused by the rotating weights 2l may be represented by the radial arrow 23. This centrifugal force tends to pull the shaft I 9 in a closed circular or loop path, represented by the arrow 24, which has a center of curvature that is eccentric to the axis of the shaft I9. These weights 2l therefore tend to move ordrag the rotor bodily as a unit in a gyratory or oscillatory closedloop or circular movement, having a very small amplitude or path of movement varying with the amount of unbalance and the speed of rotation. inasmuch as the speed of the motor is relatively high, such as many hundred revolutions per minute, the frequency of the movement is relatively high. Arranged around the periphery of the motor considered in a direction transverse to the axis of the shaft IS, are a plurality of relatively soft, resilient cushion elements 25. These elements are preferably of soft, resilient gum rubber, and it has been-found that rubber having the softness of ordinary gum rubber tubing is very suitable for this purpose. in fact. the elements 25 may be usually made by using short lengths of vgum rubber tubing with fairly heavy thickness of wall.

In this particular example, such lengths of tubing have been split lengthwise through the center thereof into halves or longitudinal seg ments and then these halves or segments have been cemented or otherwisesecured to the motor,

with the split faces abutting and secured to the motor faces. These elements 25 are disposed in pairs around the transverse periphery of the motor frame at approximately equally spaced zones, and in this `particular example, since the motor has four generally flat sides, these elements may be placed in pairs in corresponding positions on the four generally fiat faces of the motor. These resilient elements are slightly7 thicker than-the desired distance from the motor to eachsidewall of the chamber of the housing, so that when the motor with the resilient elements thereon is placed within the housing, these elements will be under compression between the motor and housing with the result that these elements iloatingly and resiliently support the motor from the walls of the housing I! and space it therefrom. In other words, these pieces of rubbertubing constitute the sole and floating support for the motor and space it from the walls of housing i4, and offer the same resilient resistance to movement ofthe motor in any transverse direction within the housing.

To prevent displacement of the motor along the housing, the walls of the housing may have concave grooves or recesses therein in which portions of the resilient elements are received and` for convenience, these recesses have concave walls which receive convex faces of the resilient elements. The motor is disposed with the axis of asiento rotation of the shaft I9 extending in a direction endwise of the housing, and the housing is disposed with its longitudinal sides extending in a direction crosswise of the mattress or support. When the housing with the motor contained therein is disposed in this position and operated, the motor, by its imbalance, will not only move in a closed loop, gyratory path, as illustrated in Fig. l0, but it will tend through the resilient or floating mounting, to drag the housing with it in this path of small amplitude but high frequency, and thus cause the entire housing iii to be given this gyratcry movement.

Referring again to Figs. 1-4, the housing lli is secured firmly to the adjacent member l5, which extends crosswise of the mattress, and that member l5 is connected through the rods er bars i6 to the other member l5 adjacent the other end of the mattress. Hence, these gyratory movements of the housing I4, which are shown in an exaggerated manner by the arrow 2@ of Fig. 4, Will be imparted to the members is and the bars or rods i6, and since the entire resilient part of the mattress unit is under sidewise and endwise compression, and the rods lil tautly connect the members Iii, these gyratory lilOVmeIltS will be transmitted to the resilient unit formed of al1 the compressed coil springs. A person resting upon a mattress being given such gyrations, will also receive such gyrations, and it has been delinitely demonstrated by medical authorities that this type of gyratory movement improves circulation, causes relaxation of the muscles of the patient and has other beneiicial therapeutic effects on him.

inasmuch as the housing ifi is of less vertical depth than the lengths of the springs which it replaces, the upper and lower faces of the housing may carry pads which bring the effective vertical depth of the housing to levels with the ends of the springs adjoining the same. The members l5 and connecting bars l 6 are, of course. of less width or vertical dimension than the lengths of the springs, so that a patient resting upon the mattress will not be uncomfortable through contact with these members l5 bars IB. The padding on the end of the mattress where the housing id is located, and the enclosing textile casing are provided with screened apertures alined with the apertures il of the housing, so that air may pass freely through the housing if'. The motor is supplied with current through a twin cable 2"". If desired, the members l may also be tied together by cables, cords or wires 28 Which pass through alined apertures in the bars I6, and aid in transmitting the gyratory movements of the bars iii to the connected coil springs in the mattress.

In Figs. 5 and 6, the construction is similar to that of Figs. 1-4, except that the connecting bars or means iii are replaced by pigtail helicals or strips 2t. These helicals are usually :formed of highly tempered or hardened metal with a relatively large pitch, and it has been found that a i4 gage stiff wire, pigtail helical of outside diameter and pitch of S/s inch is very satisfactory for this purpose. The ends of these helicals are received in apertures in the bers i5, as shown in Fig. 6, and tapered plugs Elfi are then driven into the open ends of helicals within the members i5. so as to expand them into firm engagement with the members i5 and thus lock the helicals firmly to these members. To aid in this expansion, the tures in the members i5 may be slightly tapered,

outwardly divergent, towards the adjacent ends, so that any pull on the helicals will tend to pull the plugs further into the apertures in members i5 and wedge them more tightly therein. These members 29 are preferably taut or under tension when secured in the members i 5 and since they have considerable rigidity but can flex on relatively long arcs, they perform a similar function to that of the bars Hi, but they have the advantage that while they have considerable rigidity, which aids in transmitting gyrations they do enable the mattress to be flexed somewhat about transverse lines between its ends. For example, when such a mattress is placed on a hospital bed, in which the head and foot sections can be cranked into angular or inclined elevated positions, the mattress will iiex to accommodate such movements, yet at the same time the helicals have suflicient rigidity to aid in transferring these gyratory movements throughout the entire resilient unit formed or" the helical springs lil connected together under compression and having incorporated therein the members lli and the helicals 29. The construction is otherwise the same as in Figs. l-4 and the action is similar thereto.

in Fig. 7 another embodiment of the invention is illustrated, which is similar to Figs. 1-4 except that the bars iii are replaced by round wires or somewhat iiexible rods or cables 3i which connect, and transmit vibratory movements between the members i5. Since these Wires 3i are Flexible they also Will permit some ilexing oi the mattress about transverse lines intermediate the ends thereof when that is necessary. The construction and operation are otherwise the same as explained in connection with Figs. l-4.

It is believed that the operation of the device will be understood from the foregoinfr description, and will not be repeated. It will be noted that since the housing having the electric motor theein to provide the gyratory action, is disposed at the end of the mattress, it will not interfere with the comfort of a `person resting upon the mattress, and the same time the holes i? enable the fans 25 to circulate air continuously through the housing, remove all heat from the motor, and make the device entirely safe from any fire hazard, due to overheating oi the motor. The textile housing and fabricA overlying the housing i4 in the end edge wall of the mattress may be made in sections or in flap form, so that when access to the housing lli for servicing oi the motor is desired, the flaps or sections may be removed so as to expose the housing and the latter may then be opened to remove, replace or service the motor.

En Fig. ll. a slight modification of the construction shown in Figs. 8 and 4 is illustrated, in which the members le between their ends are made of sections Ilia hinged together end to end by nus leb. 'The sections left re 7e equal to the diameters of the springs il links are preferably tied to the springs against which they abut. This enables matti ff manner to flex upon transverse lines when flexing .is desired.

It will be understood that various changes in the details and arrangements of which have been herein described and illustrated order to explain the nature of the h ention, may se made by those skilled in thn art within the principle and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

. Iclaim as my invention:

l. An inner spring mattress for giving therapeutic treatments to a person resting thereon, comprising a plurality of helical springs disposed parallel to each other, side by side, and tied together to form a resilient unit, a cushion layer enclosing said unit, a casing enclosing said layer and unit, with said unit under substantial compression lengthwise and sidewise, a pair of spaced apart, parallel rigid bars disposed within said casing, extending in directions crosswise of the unit, adjacent opposite ends thereof, and each overrunning and abutting against a plurality of said coils of said unit, means connecting said bars for transmitting vibratory movements between them, a hollow housing disposed adjacent one end of the unit, and firmly secured to the adjacent one of said bars, a motor within said housing and spaced entirely from the walls thereof, sai-d motor having a rotor with a predetermined, mechanical axial unbalance of substantial amount well in excess of any accidental unbalance due to inaccurate manufacture and disposed with its axis of rotation extending in a direction parallel to the planes of the outside faces of said unit and parallel to the longitudinal axes of said bars, and substantially resilient members interposed under stress between said `motor and housing walls and constituting the sole and iloating support of said motor from said housing, said u members being arranged about said motor in a transversely peripheral direction, whereby rotation of said motor will, by said unbalance, cause gyratory, bodily movements of said motor as a unit in a small closed loop path which are transmited through said housing, said bars and said connecting means to said unit and thereby to a person resting on said mattress.

2. An inner spring support for giving therapeutic treatments to a person resting thereon, comprising a pair of cushion pads of the size of a mattress and spaced apart, a plurality of coil springs arranged side by side in upright, parallel relation to each other between and spacing said pads, a self-contained, power operated element disposed between said pads and when operated having a. gyratory, closed loop movement of high frequency and small amplitude about a horizontal axis parallel to the faces of said pads, said springs being compressed and held together and to said element in directions parallel to the faces of said pads to form a resilient unit, a member extending crosswise of a plurality of coils between their ends at a distance from said element,

and means connecting said member to said element, in taut condition, to transmit motion from said element to said member, whereby the gyratory impulses of said element will be transmitted to and throughout said unit and pads, and thence to a person resting thereon.

3. The support substantially as recited in claim 2, in which said element is at one end of said unit and a face of said element is in the plane of and forms part of an end edge face of said unit, whereby said element' may be vented through an end edge face of said support.

4. An inner spring support for giving thera peutic treatments to a person resting thereon, comprising a plurality of coil springs arranged side by side in upright, parallel relation to each other, a self-contained, power operated element having, when operated, a gyratory, closed loop movement of high frequency and small amplitude about a horizontal axis, said element and springs being compressed together in different directions crosswise of the axes of the coils of the springs, and held in such compressed condition, to form a resilient unit, with said axis crosswise of the length of said unit and parallel to its faces, a member extending transversely across a plurality of Said springs between the ends of the springs and approximately parallel to said axis, but at a substantial distance away from said element, and means connecting said element to said member for transmitting motion from said element to said member and with said member and element imparting gyratory impulses to said unit.

5. An inner spring support for giving therapeutic treatments to a person resting thereon, comprising a plurality of coil springs arranged side by side in upright, parallel relation to each other, a self-contained, power operated element having, when operated, a gyratory, closed loop movement of high frequency and small amplitude about a horizontal axis, said element and springs being compressed together in different directions crosswise of the axes of the coils of the springs, and held in such compressed condition, to form a resilient unit, with said axis crosswise of the length of said unit and parallel to its faces, a member extending transverseiy across a plurality of said springs between the ends of the springs and approximately parallel to said axis, but at a substantial distance away from said element, and means tightly connecting said element to said member for transmitting motion from said element to said member and with said member and element imparting gyratory impulses to said unit.

5. An inner spring support for giving therapeutic treatments to a person resting thereon, comprising a, plurality of coil springs arranged side by side in upright, paraliel relation to each other, a self-contained, power operated element having, when operated, a gyratory, closed loop movement of high frequency and small amplitude about a horizontal axis, said element and springs being compressed together in different directions crosswise of the axes of the coils of the springs, and held in such compressed condition, to form a resilient unit, with said axis crosswise of the length of said unit and parallel to its faces, a member extending transversely across a plurality of said springs between the ends of the springs and approximately parallel to said axis, but at a substantial distance away from said element, and means connecting said element to a plurality of zones of said member along the length of the member.

7. The support substantially as set forth in claim 4, and a casing enclosing said unit with said element, said element being located along and forming part of a marginal edge face of said unit and vented through said casing.

8. An inner spring support for giving therapeutic treatments to a person resting thereon, comprising a plurality of coil springs arranged side by side in upright, parallel relation to each other, a, self-contained, power operated element having, when operated, a gyratory, closed loop movement of high frequency and small amplitude about a horizontal axis, said element and springs being compressed together in different directions crosswise of the axes of the coils of the springs, and held in such compressed condition, to form a resilient unit, with said axis crosswise of the length of said unit and parallel to its faces, said element being located along and forming part of a marginal edge face of said unit, a member of rigid material rmly connected to said element so as to partake of said gyratory movements, a second member parallel to and spaced from said rst member, each of said mem bers being disposed to extend crosswise of a number of adjacent coils, parallel to said axis, and between the main faces of said unit, and means connecting said members at a plurality of zones for transmitting movements of said iirst member to the other of said members.

9. An inner spring support for giving therapeutic treatments to a person resting thereon, comprising a plurality of coil springs arranged side by side in upright, parallel relation to each other, a self-contained, power operated element, having, when operated, a gyratory, closed loop movement of high frequency and small amplitude about a horizontal axis, said element and springs being compressed together in dierent directions crosswise of the axes of the coils of the springs, and held in such compressed condition, to form a resilient unit, with said axis crosswise of the length of said unit and parallel to its faces, said element being located along and forming part of a marginal edge face of said unit, a member of rigid material rmly connected to said element so as to partake of said gyratory movements, a second member parallel to and spaced from said rst member, each ci said members being disposed to extend crosswise of a number of adjacent coils, parallel to said axis, and between the main faces of said unit, and pigtail helical members extending between and rigidly connected to said members at a plurality of zones spaced apart in a direction lengthwise along said members for transmitting movements of said iirst member to said second member.

10. An inner spring support for giving therapeutic treatments to a person resting thereon,

comprising a plurality of coil springs arranged side by side in upright, parallel relation to each other, compressed together in diierent directions crosswise of the axes of the coils of the springs, and held in such compression to form a resilient unit, a pair of parallel members of rigid material, each extending across a plurality of said springs between the ends of the springs, and adjacent opposite ends of said unit, said members being spaced apart lengthwise of and firmly secured to said unit, taut means connecting said members at a plurality of zones along their lengths, a self-contained power operated element having, when operated, a gyratory, closed loop movement of relatively high frequency and small amplitude about an axis, and means securing said element to one of said members at one end of the unit with said axis of said element parallel to the length of that member, whereby the gyrations of said element will,

by its connections to said members and unit impart impulses to said unit.

11. An inner spring support for giving therapeutic treatments to a person resting thereon, comprising a plurality of coil springs arranged side by side in upright, parallel relation to each other, compressed together in different directions crosswise of the axes of the coils of the springs, and held in such compression to form a resilient unit, a pair of parallel members of rigid material, each extending across a plurality of said springs between the ends of the springs, and adjacent opposite ends of said unit, said members being spaced apart lengthwise of and rmly secured to said unit, taut means connecting said members at a plurality of zones along their lengths, a self-contained power operated element having, when operated, a gyratory, closed loop movement of relatively high frequency and small amplitude about an axis, and means securing said element to one of said members at one end of the unit with said axis of said element parallel to the length of that member, and said element between the planes of the faces of said unit, whereby the gyrations of said element will, by its connections to said members and unit impart impulses to said unit.

12. An inner spring support for giving therapeutic treatments to a person resting thereon, comprising a plurality of coil springs arranged side by side in upright, parallel relation to each other, compressed together in different directions crosswise of the axes of the coils of the springs, and held in such compression to form a resilient unit, a pair of parallel members of rigid material, each extending across a plurality of said springs between the ends of the springs, and adjacent opposite ends of said unit, said members being spaced apart lengthwise of and rmly secured to said unit, taut means connecting said members at a plurality of zones along their lengths, a self-contained power operated element having, when operated, a gyratory, closed loop movement of relatively high frequency and small amplitude about an axis, means securing said element to one of said members at one end of the unit with said axis of said element parallel to the length of that member, and said ele ent between the planes of the faces of said unit, whereby the gyration of said element will, by its connections to said members and unit be transmitted to said unit, and means encasing said unit and element and holding it under said compression, and including padding surrounding said unit, said encasing means at its end adjacent said element having vents leading to said element.

EDWIN H. TOMPKINS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2425655 *Mar 22, 1944Aug 12, 1947Edwin H TompkinsTherapeutic device
US2460133 *Feb 6, 1946Jan 25, 1949Pedus William E LaAlarm device
US2465250 *Jan 26, 1945Mar 22, 1949Edwin H TompkinsTherapeutic device
US2479013 *Nov 7, 1945Aug 16, 1949Edwin H TompkinsTherapeutic device
US2674993 *Sep 27, 1952Apr 13, 1954Harrell GeraldineVibrating board
US2694394 *Oct 2, 1953Nov 16, 1954Miller RobertMechanical vibrator for therapeutic use
US2833276 *Aug 17, 1954May 6, 1958Owen K MurphyMotor operated kinesitherapy device
US2850009 *Jan 25, 1956Sep 2, 1958Russell A McelweeElectric heating pad and vibrator
US5014687 *Oct 3, 1989May 14, 1991Raffel Product Development Co.Mounting for vibrating motor
US5140977 *Apr 15, 1991Aug 25, 1992Raffel Product DevelopmentMounting for vibrating motor
US20120065557 *Jan 13, 2010Mar 15, 2012Cassidy PhillipsMassage roller
DE1133858B *Mar 6, 1958Jul 26, 1962Owen Kenneth MurphyTherapeutisches Kissen mit einem eine vibrierende Bewegungsenergie uebertragenden Motor
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/57, 5/720, 310/81, 310/91, 310/86
International ClassificationA61H1/00, A61H23/02, A47C21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61H2201/0142, A61H23/0263, A47C21/006, A61H2201/0138
European ClassificationA47C21/00D