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Publication numberUS2346853 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 18, 1944
Filing dateSep 6, 1943
Priority dateSep 6, 1943
Publication numberUS 2346853 A, US 2346853A, US-A-2346853, US2346853 A, US2346853A
InventorsLundvall John S
Original AssigneeUnion Asbestos & Rubber Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Convertible ice bunker for refrigerator cars
US 2346853 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

pril 18,- 19.44. J. s. LUNDVALL 'CONVERTIBLE ICE BUNKER Fon EEFRIGERATCR CARS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fiied sept. 6. 1943' IN VEN T R. ad@

Patented Apr. 18, 1944 CONVERTIBLE ICE BUNKER FOR REFRGERATOR CARS John S. Lundvall, Park Ridge, Ill., assigner to Union Asbestos & Rubber Company, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application September 6, 1943, Serial No. 501,392

(Cl. E-376) 3 Claims.

The invention relates to convertible ice bunkers for refrigerator cars and particularly to convertible bunkers of the type wherein one wall of the bunker comprises a bulkhead extending transversely of the car and movable to a stored position parallel with and adjacent the end wall of the car, and still more particularly to bulkheads of this type which are lowered and raised, vertically, into and out of anchored engagement with the car structure, respectively. My co-pending application for United States Letters Patent, Serial No. 440,027, led April 22, 1942, illustrates such a structure.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a simple and inexpensive means for preventing the accidental raising of the bulkhead out of anchored engagement with the car structure, due to the sudden starting and stopping of the car, as in switching service, causing the bulkhead, as well as the car contents, to jump vertically.

A further object is to provide a locking means, for the purpose above described, which is readily understandable to workmen having scant mevchanical ability, such as shippers who are mainly concerned with the loading of their product but who are frequently required to operate the several mechanisms associated with convertible bunkers.

Another object is to provide a simple locking means readily accessible to the operator which is located in plain sight of a person standing in the lading compartment or bunker of the car.

The above and other objects and advantages 1 of the invention will be apparent from the following description of the embodiment shown in the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure 1 is a fragmentary, side elevational view of the end portion of a refrigerator car; the side wall being broken away to show the bulkhead in extended, bunker-forming, secured position in the car.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary, enlarged sectional view, taken along line 2-2 of Fig. 4, showing the locking means in cooperative secured relation with the extended bulkhead and the bulkhead support.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary, enlarged sectional view, taken along line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary, enlarged vertical sectional view through a portion of the car, taken along line 4-4 of Fig. 1; the bulkhead being shown in supported, anchored position.

The car structure. shown in the drawings may include an end wall IU, a side wall I2, a top wall I4 and a bottom wall I 6. A floor rack I8 may be provided in the main lading compartment of the car and a door rack extension 20 may be provided in the lower portion of the bunker; the floor rack I3 being adapted to support the lading when the bulkhead is in extended position and the combined-floor rack I8 and extension 2t being adaptedto support the lading when the bulkhead is in stored position. The bulkhead `22 may include a plurality of vertical posts 24 in spaced apart relationship transversely of the car and may be provided with an inner lining 2t and a spaced apart outer lining 2S affixed to the posts 24; the space between the linings 26 and 28 providing a vertical air duct Si) in the bulkhead. A pair of horizontally disposed, spaced apart slats 32.-32 may be provided coincident with the lower margin of the bulkhead, adapted to support the bulkhead in extended position, and may be secured in overlying, spaced relation with the car floor by means of stringers 34. v,

The stringers 34 may comprise channel-like pressed metal members extending longitudinally of the car coincident with the locations of the posts 24, with their web portions vertically disposed and their opposed flanged margins horiL zontally disposed. The stringers ,34 are adapted to support the iioor rack extension 2l) and the slats 32-32 in overlying spaced relation with the car floor; the upper surfaces of the extension 26 and the slats 32-32 being preferably coplanar with the upper surface of the floor rack I8 whereby to provide a iiush lading supporting floor throughout the length of the car. The lower end of one or more of the posts 24 may be provided with an angular shaped metal plate member 3B having a horizontally disposed portion 38 in atwise, aixed engagement with the end of the post, and a vertically disposed upturned portion 40 in abutting aixed engagement with the inner surface of the post. The portion 38 of the member 36 may be provided with a depending lateral projection 42, extending parallel with and being adapted to interlockingly nest within the space between the slats 32-32; the portion 38 having supported relationship with the slats 32-32 and the projection 42 being preferably supported by the adjacent Stringer 34.

The post 24 may comprise a channel shaped member having outwardly iianged longitudinal margins 44 and a spaced apart web 46 connected by parallel spaced apart walls 48;. the

channel being open toward the ice bunker side of the post. The portion 40 of the member 36 may have spanning, flatwise, affixed relation with the opposed flanges 44 of the post and may have an aperture 50 therethrough. The web 46 may have an aperture 52 in horizontal alignment with the aperture 50; apertures 50 and 52 being adapted to pivotally mount the locking member.

The locking member may comprise a pair of pivoted detents 54 and 56 aiiiXed to the opposed ends of a horizontally disposed rotary pin 58 mounted in the apertures 50 and 52. The detents 54-56 may comprise flat metal plates having a hook conguration with their planes parallel with the plane of the bulkhead; both hooks being in common alignment with respect to the pin 58 whereby they will move simultaneously as the pin 58 is rotated. The locking member may be aflixed to one or more of the bulkhead posts 24; the Stringer 34, adjacent the locking member being provided with a channel-shaped member 60 having a vertical web in back-to-back engagement with the web portion of the adjacent stringer and having a horizontally disposed flange in opposed coplanar alignment with the upper iiange of the Stringer 34. The member 60 may be disposed vtransversely of the slats 32-32 and may extend slightly beyond each of the opposed longitudinal margins of the assembled slats 32-32.

The detents 54-56 may be disposed adjacent the outer and inner surfaces of the adjacent post, respectively, any may swing in a vertical plane parallel with the plane of the bulkhead, into and out of interlocking relation with the upper flange of the member 60; the hook portion of each detent being adapted to underlie the last named ange when in operative position. The transverse width of the assembled slats 32-32 may be greater than the transverse width of the assembled detents 54-56, and the opposed longitudinal margins of the assembled slats 32-32 may be provided with notched portions 62, adapted to permit the detents to move into ,cooperative locked relationship with the member 66 without interfering with the slats 32-32.

The outer lining 28 may comprise a series of vertically aligned, horizontally disposed boards in flatwise, affixed engagement with the posts 24. The lower board or boards may be interrupted adjacent the locking member whereby to keep the detent 54 within the outer suriiace of the lining 28 and to provide space intermediate the adjacent ends of the interrupted boards to accommodate the swinging of the detent 54; it being important to shippers that no metal parts of the bulkhead project beyond the lining 28. The adadjacent ends of the interrupted boards may be secured to the bulkhead by means of a metalA plate 64 aflixed to the outer face of the post and having opposed vertical margins in affixed, overlapping relation with said adjacent ends of the boards. The reference numeral 66 indicates the end of one of the interrupted boards adapted to serve as a means of limiting the throw of the detent 54 and adapted to hold detents 54-56 in inoperative position (as indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 4).

Particular attention is directed to the new and novel bulkhead supporting structure (slats 32-32 and assocciated structure), adapted to support the bulkhead in its extended position; adapted to hold the bulkhead against movement longitudinally of the car when in extended position;

adapted to provide the very important free movement of the chilled air downwardly through the air duct 38, through the spaces between the assembled slats 32-32 and into the air space below the lading; and adapted to provide a simple, economical means of providing a member, intermediate thefloor rack I8 and the oor rack extension 2D, having the same general shape as the slats in the rack I8 and in the extension (uniformity in the lading supporting floor) and being free from depressions and open spaces which might permit the lading to enter therein and damage same when the lading shifts longitudinally in transit.

The slats 32-32 may comprise U-shaped, elongated, metal members in spaced apart, adjacent, back-to-back relationship, supported by the stringers 34 and (coincident with the location of the locking members) by the members 6D.

The parallel, spaced apart marginal portions of the slats 32--32 may be horizontally disposed; the upper marginal portions being adapted to support the lading and the extended bulkhead and the lower marginal portions having supported engagement with the stringers 34 and members 60. The lower marginal portions of the slats 32-32 may be aixed to their supporting members by bolts or other suitable fastening means.

The detent 54 may be permanently secured to the adjacent end of the pin 58, as by welding or by riveting the end of the pin over the detent. In order to facilitate the application of the detent mechanism to the bulkhead post, the detent 56 may be removably secured to the adjacent end of the pin 58. The detent 56 may have an aperture therethrough adapted to receive the end of the pin 58 and may be provided with spaced apart laterally projecting, parallel lugs 10--10 disposed on opposite sides of the aperture and the assembled pin 58. The lugs l0-1D and the pin 58 may have aligned apertures therethrough adapted to receive a bolt 12. The detents and associated pin may be secured in assembled relationship With the bulkhead by means of the bolt 12 and may be readily removed after the bolt 12 is removed from the assembly. I

A second set of slats 32-32 may be provided adjacent the end wall of the car, to provide a bulkhead supporting and locking arrangement for the stored bulkhead.

It will be understood that the member 68 may be omitted, if desired; in which event the detents 54-56 may be arranged for interlocking relationship with the upper flange of the stringer 34, but I prefer to use the member 60 in the interest of additional strength.

I claim: n

l. In a refrigerator car having a convertible ice bunker, a bulkhead forming a wall of said bunker, said bulkhead being movable to selec,

tive positions longitudinally of the car and being vertically shiftable into interlocked relation with the car floor structure whereby to maintain said bulkhead against movement in either direction longitudinally of the car; a detent secured to the lower portion of the bulkhead, a second detent secured to said floor structure, said first named detent being adapted for selective interlocking relation with said second detent whereby to maintain said bulkhead against vertical movement suiiicient to release it from interlocked relation with said iioor structure.

2. In aV refrigerator car having a convertible ice bunker, a bulkhead forming a wall of said bunker, said bulkhead being movable to selective positions longitudinally of the car and being shiftable vertically into interlocked relation with the car floor structure whereby to maintain said bulkhead against movement in either direction longitudinally of the car; a pivoted detent secured to the lower marginal portion of the bulkhead, a fixed detent secured to the floor strucadjacent its lowei` margin, a pair of elongated spaced apart beams in parallel supporting relation with said bulkhead and in overlying spaced supported relation with the car floor, said portion having nested relation with and between said spaced apart beams adapted to anchor the bulkhead against movement longitudinally of the car, said bulkhead being movable vertically out of anchored engagement with said beams and movable longitudinally of the car; a detent on said bulkhead selectively movable into cooperative interlocked relation with a detent mounted upon said oor adapted to maintain said bulkhead in supported anchored relation with said 15 beams.

JOHN S. LUNDVALL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2495903 *Oct 22, 1945Jan 31, 1950Union Asbestos & Rubber CoConvertible bulkhead
US6626625 *Jul 20, 2001Sep 30, 2003Roger NelsonSystem and method for partitioning cargo areas
US6857834May 1, 2003Feb 22, 2005Fg Products, Inc.Bulkhead lift apparatus
US6923610 *Aug 7, 2003Aug 2, 2005Fg Products, Inc.System and method for partitioning cargo areas
US7195435Jan 26, 2005Mar 27, 2007Illinois Tool Works Inc.Partition system
US7214017Mar 17, 2005May 8, 2007Fg Products, Inc.System and method for partitioning cargo areas
US7300236Jan 12, 2005Nov 27, 2007Fg Products, Inc.Bulkhead lift apparatus
US7338239Mar 29, 2007Mar 4, 2008Fg Products, Inc.System and method for partitioning cargo areas
US7445412Nov 9, 2007Nov 4, 2008Fg Products, Inc.System and method for partitioning cargo areas
US7600955Oct 16, 2007Oct 13, 2009Fg Products, Inc.Bulkhead lift apparatus and methods
US7607874Oct 13, 2008Oct 27, 2009Fg Products, Inc.System and method for partitioning cargo areas
US8087859Nov 12, 2008Jan 3, 2012Fg Products, Inc.Systems and methods for separating cargo spaces
US8146985Jul 23, 2009Apr 3, 2012Fg Products, Inc.Door seal systems and methods for temperature-controlled cargo containers
US20040005204 *May 1, 2003Jan 8, 2004Roger NelsonBulkhead lift apparatus
US20040126200 *Aug 7, 2003Jul 1, 2004Fg Products, Inc., A Wisconsin CorporationSystem and method for partitioning cargo areas
US20050163584 *Jan 26, 2005Jul 28, 2005Illinois Tool Works Inc.Partition system
US20050201843 *Mar 17, 2005Sep 15, 2005Fg Products, Inc.,System and method for partitioning cargo areas
US20050207860 *Jan 12, 2005Sep 22, 2005Fg Products, Inc., A Wisconsin CorporationBulkhead lift apparatus
US20070166120 *Mar 29, 2007Jul 19, 2007Fg Products, IncSystem and Method For Partitioning Cargo Areas
US20080063487 *Nov 9, 2007Mar 13, 2008Fg Products, IncSystem and Method for Partitioning Cargo Areas
US20080159823 *Oct 16, 2007Jul 3, 2008Fg Products, Inc.Bulkhead Lift Apparatus and Methods
US20090041558 *Oct 13, 2008Feb 12, 2009Fg Products, Inc.System and Method for Partitioning Cargo Areas
Classifications
U.S. Classification410/129, 62/328
International ClassificationB61D27/00
Cooperative ClassificationB61D27/0027
European ClassificationB61D27/00B2