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Publication numberUS2347246 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 25, 1944
Filing dateSep 17, 1941
Priority dateSep 17, 1941
Publication numberUS 2347246 A, US 2347246A, US-A-2347246, US2347246 A, US2347246A
InventorsCharles G Barrett
Original AssigneeCharles G Barrett
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Razor blade sharpener
US 2347246 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April25,1944- c. G. BARRETT 2 r 2,347,246

RAZOR BLADE SHAR PENER Filed Sept. 17, 1941 Patented Apr. 25, 1944 UNITED STATE S PATENT- aorFict-J 2,347,240 r aAzon BLADE sHARPENEa Charles Barrett, Alexandria, Va. 1" Application September 17, 1941, Serial No. 411,239

9 Claims,

This invention relates to a razor blade sharpener or honer, and has for an object to provide improved razor blade sharpeners which will be simple and inexpensive of construction and will be easy and certain of operation.

A further object of this invention is to provide a razor blade honer which may be made of cast or pressed metal such as steel, but may likewise be made of any other suitable material such as brass or composition of matter, one well known composition of matter serviceable for this purpose being a phenolic condensation product com.- mercially known as Bakelite. Likewise any other suitable material may be used which is capable of being made into the particular form or outline of this invention and which maybe provided with a smooth surface.

Many razor blade honers and sharpeners ar already well known along the general line of this invention including the use of the inside of a drinking glass, but in all theprior known forms the principal defect present is that their successful operation is too dependent upon the personal element of the operator.. The edges ofa double-edged razor blade for which this invention is intended are at a double angle to the plane of the body of the blade, and it is therefore necessary when honing or sharpening the edge of the blade that the blade be held at the proper angle to the sharpening surface within very small limits.

When using the form of power known sharpener typified by the inside of a drinking glass, the finger of the operator is usually placed on one surface of the blade as the blade is moved back and forth over the sharpening surface. When so operated, it is necessary that just the proper amount of pressure be placed on the top of the blade in order to bend the blade to the'proper curvature to make the edges of the blade to come into proper contact with the sharpening surface. With too little pressure, there will be no sharp ening effect. With too great pressure, the blade wil be bent so much that the bevel at the edges will cause the extreme edges to be bent away from contact with the sharpening surface thus likewise producing no sharpening effect.

With this invention, the sharpening effect takes place at four constantly changing points on a double-edged razor blade, two points on each edge, and the weight of the razor blade is relied on for keeping the blade at just the proper angle and just the proper pressure on these four points so as to produce the best sharpening effect.

. This sharpener represents the introduction of a basically new principle and design into the practice or art of maintaining a continuously sharp and effective cutting edge on the conventional type of double-edge safety razor blade. Omittin reference to the varioustypesof more or less complicated stroppingi devices, the conventiona1 type of hone sharpener heretofore available has consisted of a one-piece molded abrasive formed with a more or less suitably curved plain concave surfaceover which the blade is moved in varying and irregular paths as determined by the pressure and push of the forefinger on the blade. Obviously,thetravel of the blade over the sharpening surface will never repeat itself exactly,and the pressure of the forefinger on theblade'will vary'as' between different individuals and will also vary'from day to day for the same individual, resulting irra continuously varying bending efi'ect on the blade and a correspondingly continuously varying sharpening angle 'for' the cutting edge of the blade with respect to the surface of the sharpener. I

With a thing so delicate as the edge of a razor blade, it is definitely necessary that these variables beeliminated, and that the blade in its travel over the'sharpener be confined to a fixed and pro-determined path which 'must positively repeat itself'at every stroke, and that the pressure applied against the 'sharpeningsurface shall also be pre-determine'dand of just the correct value to give the desired sharpening effect. When so arranged, "the sharpening "process becomes semi-automatic and positive in its results, mere ly'depending upon the hand to impart motion to the sharpener and blade. These desirable and necessary actions are obtained by the simple expedients ofusinga suitably designed box or container'to'jlimidand define the path of the blade with respect to the' sharpener, and by so designing the surface of the sharpener in respect to its contact withthe cutting edge of" theblade that the weight'of theblade automatically and necessarily creates the proper unit pressure of blade on sharpener at points of contact...

With the foregoingand other objects in view, this invention comprises the combination, construction and arrangement of parts hereinafter claimed, disclosed and illustrated in the accompanying drawing,- wherein: l

Fig.1.is a perspective view of the sharpener within the container; '1 1 Fig. 2 is a perspective view: of the sharpener with the blade thereon in operative sharpening position Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the sharpener of this invention;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view on line 44 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a partly broken away view of the housing and cover in which the sharpener is kept;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view on the line 6-45 of Fig. 4; and

Fig. 7 is a sectional view on the line 1-1 of Fig. 5.

Thereis shownat II), the razor sharpener of this invention which'consists ofa box or housing I I to which may be applied a cover I9 for closing the same and keeping dust or grit from accumulating on the sharpener block I2. This sharpener block I2 is the essence of this invention and may be made of a suitable abrasive material, cast, molded, shaped or machined to the shape and form shown, depending upon the material of which it is to be made.

This block I2 has a fiat rectangular bottom I3 and flat rectangular ends I4 so shaped that they fit within the bottom and endsof the box II. The top surface I5 is in the-form of a section of a cylinder of suitable radius, the width of the block being just equal to or very slightly-greater than the cutting edge lfi'of a conventional sized double-edged razorblade I1, which is to be sharpened thereon.

Upstanding from this concave surface I5 are a plurality of ridges I8 forming a diamondshaped outline, symmetrically placed with respect to the, sides and ends of the block I0. As will beseen, the ridges I 8 cross each other at points and 2|, the'points ZIlbeing in the center line between the ends I4 of the block and very close to the-side edges thereof, while thepoints 2| are in th center, line between the side edges of the block and close-to the ends Ilof; the block.

The housing I I'consists of a small box suitably sized to. fit about the, block along the bottom andends thereoflbut slightly wider than the block, by the thickness of 1 two false sides;22. Each of these false sides 2;2 are cut away as shown in Figs. 2 and 5, so-as to provide stops 23 cooperating withthe notched; necks 24 of the razor blade I1, the thickness 'of thesefalse'sides being substantially equal to: or somewhat less than the distance: of the, notched necks 24 extending beyond the end points of the razor edges l6.

One of the sides 25 of the housing II is providedwith a centrally'located finger notch 26 extending to just below the center point of the block I2. The; cover -l9 is provided with: oppositely disposed shallow finger notches 21' to facilitate removing the cover I 9-from the housingor. box II. e

In operation, the cover I9 is removed from the box II in order to use the sharpenerwhich,

however, is not-removedbut is left within the frame or boxI-I. Then, holding the sharpener in the box with the cover removed in the palm of the left hand with the finger notch 26 to the right, grasp the blade at the end between thumb and forefinger of .the right handand lay the blade II. across the'sharp'ener ridge I8 in the position shown in Fig. 2, using the forefinger at the finger or thumb notch 26 to ease the blade I! at the right end-gently down to the surface of the ridges I8 of the sharpener block I 2.- Then grasp the sharpener box'between the forefinger and thumb of the right hand 28, as shown in Fig. 2, and shake the sharpener toward and from the body just vigorously enough to make-the blade travel from end to end of its stroke as determined by blade stops 23 at the sides of the box for ten or a dozen full strokes and finish with a similar number of short strokes, slowly working the blade from end to end of the sharpener by suitably inclining the sharpener toward and away from the body while continuing to shake the sharpener in short and fairly rapid movements. Then transfer the sharpener to the left hand, removing blade I1 by using the forefinger of the right hand at the finger notch 26 to raise the blade from the surface of the sharpener sufficiently to grasp it between the thumb and forefinger. Then, reverse the blade and repeat the sharpening operation on the other side of the blade edges in the same manner as described above.

It will be apparent that the sharpening effect will take place on the blade edges at constantly changing point contacts between the blade edges I6 and the ridges I8 as the blade I! slides back and forth thereover.

This action applied to a new blade will appreciably improve its shaving qualities and, when repeated about every third day, will prolong the life of a blade from two to three months. After using, the cover I9 should be replaced on the box to protect the sharpening surface from dust and dirt.

The novel features and the operation of this device will be apparent from the foregoing description. While the device has been shown and the structure described in detail, it is obvious that this invention is not to be considered limited to the exact form disclosed, and that changes may be made therein within the scope of what is claimed without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Having thus set forth and disclosed the nature of this invention, what is claimed is:

1'. A razor blade sharpener or honer comprising a substantially rectangular member adapted to be held in the hand of an operator, said rectangularmember having an upper concav surface, a plurality-of criss-crossed angular ridges upstandingfrom said concave surface to provide constantly changing point contact surfaces as the blade is moved parallel to the longitudinal ,sides, means for keeping the razor blade in proper angular relation to the contact point sharpening surfaces of said ridges, said means comprising a housing in which said sharpener block is retained, said sharpener block being of a Width substantially equal to the length of the blade edges, and false sides in said framework between the sides of said sharpening block and the sides of said housing, saidfa-lse sides being of a thickness not greater than the length of a razor blade neck beyond the blade edges, said false sides being cut away to a point slightly distant fromv the ends of the sharpener block to provide stops cooperating with necks of the blade to limit the travel of'the blade over the sharpening surfaces.

2. A razor blade sharpener or honer comprising a substantially rectangular member adapted to be held in the hand of an operator, said rectangular member havin an upper concave surface, a pluralit of criss-crossed angular ridges upstanding from said concave surface to provide constantly changing point contact surfaces as the blade is moved parallel to the longitudinal sides, meansfor keeping the razor blade in proper angular relation to the contact point sharpening surfaces of said ridges, said means comprising a housing in which said sharpener block is retained, said sharpener block being of a width substantially equal to the length of the blade edges,

and false sides in said framework between the sides of said sharpening block and the sides of said housing, said false sides being of a thickness not greater than the length of a razor blade neck beyond the blade edges, said false sides being cut away to a point slightly distant from the ends of the sharpener block to provide stops cooperating with necks of the blade to limit the travel of the blade over the sharpening surfaces, one of said sides having a finger-notch extendin therein adjacent its center permitting proper placement and removal of the blade from the sharpening surface.

3. A razor blade sharpener or honer comprising a substantially rectangular member adapted to be held in the hand of an operator, said rectangular member having an upper concave surface, a plurality of cries-crossed angular continuous ridges upstanding from said concave surface to provide constantly changing point contact surfaces arranged to form progressively and repetitiously, continuous straight line contact at each point of blade support as the blade is moved parallel to the longitudinal sides, guide means for keeping the razor blade in proper angular relation to the contact point sharpening surfaces of said ridges, and stop means cooperating with blade necks to limit the travel of the blade.

4. A razor blade sharpener or honer comprising a substantially rectangular member adapted to be held in the hand of an operator, said rectangular member having an upper concave surface, a plurality of angular continuous rid es upstanding from said concave surface to provide constantly changing point contact surfaces arranged to form progressively and repetitiously, continuous straight line contacts at each point of blade support as the blade is moved parallel to the longitudinal sides, guide means for keeping the razor blade in proper angular relation to the contact point sharpening surfaces of said ridges, and stop means cooperating with blade necks to limit the travel of the blade.

5. A razor blade sharpener or honer comprising a substantially rectangular member adapted to be held in the hand of an operator, said rectangular member having an upper concave surface, a plurality of angular ridges upstanding from said concave surface to provide constantly changing point contact surfaces as the blade is moved parallel to the longitudinal sides, and guide means cooperating with the ends of blade necks to guide the blade in its travel for keeping the razor blade in proper angular relation to the contact point sharpening surfaces of said ridges.

6. A razor blade sharpener or honer comprising a substantially rectangular member adapted to be held in the hand of an operator, said rectangular member havin an upper concave surface, a plurality of angular ridges upstanding from said concave surface to provide constantly changing point contact surfaces as the blade is moved parallel to the longitudinal sides, guide means cooperatin with the ends of blade necks to guide the blade in its travel for keeping the razor blade in proper angular relation to the contact point sharpening surfaces of said ridges, and stop means cooperating with the sides of the blade necks to limit the travel of the blade.

7. A razor blade sharpener or honer comprising a substantially rectangular member adapted to be held in the hand of an operator, said rectangular member having an upper concave surface, and a plurality of criss-crossed angular continuous ridges upstanding from said concave surface to form a single diamond shaped sharpening sur face whose diagonals are substantially equal respectively to the length of the stroke of the blade and the Width of the cuttin edge Of the blade.

8. A razor blade sharpener or honer comprising a substantially rectangular member adapted to be held in the hand of an operator, said rectangular member having an upper concave surface, a plurality of criss-crossed angular continuous ridges upstandin from said concave surface to form a single diamond shaped sharpening surface whose diagonals are substantially equal respectively to the length of the stroke of the blade and the width of the cutting edge of the blade, and stop means limiting the stroke of the blade.

9. A razor blade sharpener or honer comprising a substantiall rectangular member adapted to be held in the hand of an operator, said rectangular member havin an upper concave surface, a plurality of criss-crossed angular continuous ridges upstanding from said concave surface to form a single diamond shaped sharpening surface whose diagonals are substantially equal respectively to the length of the stroke of the blade and the width of the cutting edge of the blade, stop means limiting the stroke of the blade, and guide means maintaining the lateral position of the blade with respect to the sharpener.

CHARLES G. BARRETT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2422048 *May 22, 1945Jun 10, 1947John W SharpSafety-razor blade sharpener
US2563332 *May 10, 1949Aug 7, 1951Hebbard Charles BApparatus for multiple separation in heavy density mediae
US3747281 *Mar 11, 1970Jul 24, 1973Annenberg ECutting tool for forming shaped articles
US5558572 *Jul 26, 1994Sep 24, 1996Eze-Lap Diamond Products, Inc.Package/pedestal for sharpening stone
US7374475 *Feb 9, 2005May 20, 2008Locan Properties, LlcHand-held sharpener device
Classifications
U.S. Classification451/556
International ClassificationB24D15/08
Cooperative ClassificationB24D15/088
European ClassificationB24D15/08I