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Publication numberUS2347440 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 25, 1944
Filing dateJun 13, 1941
Priority dateJun 13, 1941
Publication numberUS 2347440 A, US 2347440A, US-A-2347440, US2347440 A, US2347440A
InventorsMax Skolnik
Original AssigneeFibro Mold Specialties Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Burial vault
US 2347440 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 25, 1944 M sKoLNlK BURIAL VAULT Filed June 15, 1941 INVENTOR BY Max Siro Luik Y" Me ATTORNEYS Patented rApr. 25, 1944 .assimiio BURAL VAULT Max Skolnik, Chicago, Ill., assignor to Fibro Mold Specialties, Inc., Chicago, lll., a corporation of Illinois Application June 13, 1941, Serial No. v397,924

(Cl. l2-7) 4 Claims.

This invention relates to a burial vault and method of making the same.

Heretofore burial vaults were made of steel and of concrete which may or may not be reinforced. Concrete vaults, even though reinforced, are objectionable because of their appearance, their porosity, and because of their relatively great weight. Steel vaults are undesirable because they are subject to electrolysis and soon become rusted.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a light weight, inexpensive burial vault which is strong and unaffected by water, even for long periods of time.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an economical method of making a waterproof burial vault which is light in weight and which has a highly decorative and pleasing appearance.

Other objects of the present invention will be apparent from the following description of the invention, which is illustrated by the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a vault embodying the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of a portion of the vault viewed from the line 2-2 of Fig. 1, and having portions broken away to show the construction of the cover portion of the vault;

Fig. 3 is an elevational view of the lower 'righthand corner of the vault of Fig. 1, viewed from the line 3-3 of Fig. 1, and having portions removed to show the construction of the body por tion` of the vault;

Fig. 4 is a horizontal section through a corner portion of the vault taken on line 4 4 of Fig. 3, showing its construction; and

Fig. 5 is a sectional view on line 5 5 of Fig. 1, showing the construction of the cover, and showing the manner in which the cover cooperates with the body portion. 4

Referring more particularly to the drawing, wherein like parts are designated by like numerals of reference throughout the several views, a vault embodying the present invention has a boxlike body portion 2 and a cover portion 3, adapted to cooperate with said body portion and form a seal therewith.

The body portion comprises sides 4, ends 5, and a bottom 6. Load-supporting side panels 4a, and panels 5a, and the bottom 6 are secured together in box-like form with the joints'between said panels and between said panels and said bottom lled with a waterproofing material, suchy as bituminous material. A layer l of a hardened decorative cement, such as magnesium oxychloride cement, preferably reinforced by fibrous material such as asbestos bers, as hereinafter described, covers the exterior of the panels and of the bottom. The layer is applied in plastic form and so it adheres to said panels. This layer 'l is ystippled to provide a rough, rocklike outer surface 8, and a coating 9 of waterproof material, .such as bituminous material or asphaltum, which is solid at ordinary temperatures, is applied over said cement to improve its water resistance and, if desired, a finish coat not shown) of paint containing metal powder may be applied over the coating 9 to provide a pleasingv metallic appearance if desired. m,

The side panels 4a, end panels 5a, and bottom panel 6a preferably contain a plurality of fibrous panel elements I0, fastened together to form a continuous solid Iibrous panel base which is substantially coextensive with the respective side, end, or bottom. The panel elements are preferably of kWood or other brous material adapted to` receive metal fasteners, and they preferably have suitable tongue and groove side edges Il, although Wooden lath are satisfactory. The panel elements in the side and end panels are preferably vertical and of substantially the same heightas the height of said side panels. When the panel elements are wooden lath it is preferred that both vertical and horizontal lath be used and that the horizontal lath be spaced apart by about 1A" or so. Means, such as corrugated metal'fasteners I2, are provided for'holding the panel elements l0 together so as to form a rigid supporting base for-the panels.

The'at, rigid, supporting bases of the panels and of the bottom, consisting of a plurality of panel elements I0 'solidly fastened together, have a contacting coating` |3a of waterproofing material,` preferably asphalt, over their entire surfaces, .which coating partially impregnates the wood. Av layer I3 of fiber-reinforced waterproofing material, such as tarred paper, tarred felt, and the 'like is attached to at least oneside, and preferably to bothsides, of the rigid supporting bases to form the load-supporting panels or bottom.

Inthe preparation of the body portion of the vault, the panel elements l0 may be cut to size andeach joint dipped into waterproofing material, such as hot molten asphaltum or other bitumen, at about 210 F. The edges of the elements are then forced together and connected with suitable fastening means, such as the metal fasteners I2, to form a rigid supporting base for each panel. The waterproofing material is then applied over the entire supporting base and, while the Waterproofing material, such as bituminous material, is still in the molten stage, the sheet waterproofing material I3, such as tarred felt or tarred paper, is applied to `each side of the panel base and rolled out, preferably with steam rollers, so that the panel has a smooth surface impervious to water. The side, end and bottom panels of the vault are then assembled in a boxlike form. Just prior to assembly, however,

the lapping portions I5 are preferably coated with molten waterproofing material, so that the box formed by the panels is water-impervious.

The hardened decorative coating 1 is .applied from a plastic cement composition, preferablyv magnesium cement, containing a substantial proportion of fibrous material, such as short fiber asbestos. In the application to the panels of the bodyr portion the cement is preferably` applied as two coats, the firstnthin coat `being brushed orrubbed vigorously in contact with the sheet waterproofing material or asphalt, and the next coat being superimposed thereon to form a relatively thick layer. 1. It is sometimes desirable that the second coat contain lwoven reinforcing material, and burlap, soaked vvithrplastic magnesium oxychloride cement, is entirely satis factory. During the setting o f the cement the exothermic reaction causes softening of the asphalt and forms a firm bond between the panels and the layer 1. l

If the rough orstlppled surface is desired, it maybe produced by various methods known to those skilled in the art, and an'outer waterproofing coatingl 9 may be convenientlyjapplied by spraying moltenY asphalt over the stippled surface 8 of the hardenedy cement.

The cover has a peripheral frame `I6 formed of sides and ends securedftogether and a shaped, central base portion I'I, carried by said frame and extending completelyover the window of said frame. A layer I8 'ofhardened' cement which contains reinforcing members, preferably metal lath I9, suitably spaced therein, extends over said frame and said shaped portion, and adheres thereto. One or more layers 20 of cement'reinf forced by fibrous material,` preferably burlapthoroughly soaked in" a slurry of magnesium oxychlorlde cement, issuperimposed over the metal reinforcing cement layer- I8 and lintegrally adheres thereto. The burlap-cement coating serves to further increase the load-carrying capacity of the cover'. A layer2I of hardened ce'-V ment, also preferably a magnesium oxychloride cement or other hydraulic cement, is appliedrover the reinforcing layersf20 and'is preferably stip-' pled to provide a rough decorative surface. The decorative surface of the outer layer 2I,is generally coated with a thin layerv of' solid .waterproofing material, such as tar, Vasphalt or other bituminous material which is solid at normal temperatures. Such waterproofing material marl:-l edly increases the kwater-resistance of the outer cement coatings and improves the life of the` vault.

The frame I6 may comprise a peripheral rigid frame member 23, preferably ofv Wood, with a covering or layer 2d. of suitable brous reinforced cement, such as burlap soaked in magnesium oxychloridefcement. The frame IIi Apreferably has a groove 25 in its lower face 28 and around its periphery to receive the tapered edges 29 2,347,440 iii of the body portion 2. The central base portion l1 has an inner surface member or sheet of fibrous waterproofing material 25, such as tarred felt, tar paper, or the like, and a stiffening member 21 of hardened plastic material, which is preferably burlap o1' fibrous materials which have been soaked in a magnesium oxychloride cement slurry-and allowed to harden.

In the preparation of a lcover embodying the present invention, the frame I6 is formed by fastening the Wood frame members 23 together in a suitable manner, dipping them in a hot bituminous material, and wrapping them with nesium oxychloride cement causes melting of the bituminous material on the frame members Y23 and the formation of a relatively solid bond between the burlap and the frame members.

The shaped central base portion of the cover is prepared by bending a suitable sheet of fibrous waterproof material, such as tarred felt, tarred paper andthe like, in the desired shape to form the inner surface of the shaped central portion of the cover, and superimposing thereon at least one layer of'a hardenable cement, such as magnesium oxychloride cement, which preferably contains burlap or other brous material in substantial amount. The hardenable sheet 21 may be prepared by soaking a sheet of burlap in magnesium oxychloride cement. It is spread over the layer 25 and allowed to harden in contact with the inner waterproofed` surface layer 25 while the latter is held inthe desired form. Upon hardening, it is found to bond to the tarred felt or v.tar paper 25 so that both layers are held in the desired form for the central shaped portion of thecover 3. i

The'centralbase portion' I'I comprising the inner surface member 25 and the stiffening sheet member 21 is then placed-,on the frame I6 and united vtherewith by suitable means. The metal reinforcing members I9, such as metal laths, 4are then placed over the entire uppersurface of the frame and the formed base of the central portion. A plastic cement composition, preferably magnesium oxychloride lcement containing fibrous material such as 1 asbestos fibers, is then applied thereover and 4around the metal reinforcing members I9, and against the frame and the central base portion I'I. During the hardening. period, it firmly unites the frame with the formed -v central portion of the cover. A plurality of layers of burlap saturated with magnesium oxychloride cement is superimposedon the metal reinforcedlayer I8 to furtherstiffen the vault' cover.

The hardened decorative layer 2| may be applied in plastic form over the external surface of the layers 20 and stippled to provide a rough appearance.. A waterproong coating 30 of normally, solid bituminous material or'the like is n. then sprayed over the external surface of thel decorative coating 2I to `render it entirely impervious to water. kIf desired,vthe asphalt coating 30 may also be sprayed with metallic paint to give the vault a metallic appearance.

The plastic decorative cement and the hardenable cements used in the preparation of vaults of the present'invention are preferably of the magnesium oxychloride type, comprising essentially magnesium oxide, magnesium chloride andv water, and a substantial amountof nely 11u144 verized silica, together with some iibrous material to decrease the brittleness of the hardened material. This class of cements has been found to be particularly well adapted for adhering to meltable Waterproofing materials, such as bituminous materials including asphalt and tars which are normally solid at room temperatures.

The burial vaults prepared as above described are of relatively low cost, are relatively light in weight, and have a very pleasing appearance. Even though the load supporting elements may be of wood, it would seem that they are protected at all times from contact with moisture, water, or other deteriorating elements.

Although several embodiments of the invention have been herein shown and described, it will be understood that numerous modications of the construction shown may be resorted to Without departing from the spirit of this invention as dened in the appended claims.

What I claim ist I 1. A Water-resistant burial vault having a boxlike body portion and a cover portion adapted to cooperate with said 'body portion to form a leakproof seal therewith, said body portion comprising load supporting end panels, load supporting side panels and a bottom secured together to form a box, a coating of hardened magnesium oxychloride cement over the outer surface of said box and adhered to said panels and to said bottom and a coating of waterproofing material over the exterior of said hardened cement, said load supporting panels having a solid brous panel base coated with a normally solid bituminous material and having superimposed on said coating and integral therewith at least one layer of tarred paper, said solid brous panel lbase having a plurality of vertically aligned Wood panel elements secured together, said panel elements having a height substantially equal to the height of said panels, said magnesium cement being adhesively bonded to said tarred paper.

2. A water-resistant burial vault having a boxlike body portion and a cover portion adapted to cooperate with said body portion, said body portion comprising load supporting end panels, load supporting side panels and a bottom secured together to form a box, a coating of hardened magnesium oxychloride cement over the outer surface of said box and adhered to said panels and to said bottom and a coating of Waterproofing material over the exterior of said hardened cement, said load supporting panels having a solid fibrous panel base coated with a normally solid bituminous material and having over said coating and adhering thereto at least one layer of lbitumen-impregnated brous material, said solid brous panel .base being a plurality of vertically aligned wood panel elements with tongue and groove sides secured together, said panel elements having a height substantially equal to the height of said panels.

3. A water-resistant burial vault having a ,boxlike body portion and a cover portion adapted to cooperate with said body portion to form a leak-proof seal therewith, said body portion comprising load supporting end panels, load supporting side panels and a bottom secured together to form a box with joints between said panels and said bottom and sealed with thermoplastic Waterproong material, a coating of hardened cement over the outer surface of said box and adhesively :bonded through said thermoplastic Waterproong material to said panels and to said bottom and a coating of Waterproong material over the exterior of said hardened cement, said load supporting panels having a waterproofed solid brous panel vbase coated with a normally solid waterproofing material and having superimposed on said coating and integral therewith at least one layer of sheet waterproong material, said solid brous panel base having a plurality of vertically aligned wood panel elements secured together, said panel elements having a height substantially equal to the height of said panels and having tapered upper edges.

4. A Water-resistant burial vault having a boxlike :body portion and a cooperative cover portion adapted to cooperate with said body portion to form a seal therewith, said .body portion comprising load supporting end panels, load supporting side panels and a Ibottom secured together to form a box, a layer of hardened plastic magnesium oxychloride cement over the outer surface of said box adhering to said panels and to said bottom, said panels having a plurality of brous load supporting elements fastened together and coated on at least one side with thermoplastic Waterproong material and being bonded to said cement through said waterproofing material.

MAX SKOLNIK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7337585 *Jan 4, 2005Mar 4, 2008Gary M. BobbittLawn crypt covering system and method
US7530149Dec 28, 2007May 12, 2009Gary BobbittLawn crypt covering system and method
US8006355May 12, 2009Aug 30, 2011Gary M. BobbitLawn crypt covering system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/139, 264/256, 264/257
International ClassificationE04H13/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04H13/00
European ClassificationE04H13/00