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Publication numberUS2347961 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1944
Filing dateMay 30, 1942
Priority dateMay 30, 1942
Publication numberUS 2347961 A, US 2347961A, US-A-2347961, US2347961 A, US2347961A
InventorsAnders C Olsen
Original AssigneeAnders C Olsen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for securing lath to studding or the like
US 2347961 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 2, 1944- A. c. OLSEN 2;347,961 MEANS FOR SECURING LATH TO STUDDING OR THE LIKE Original Filed Feb. 4. 1959 2 Sheets-"Sheet 1 INVENTOR Auoems C. Owe/v. 4

ATTORNEY 2, 1944; I A. c. OLSEN 2,347,961

MEANS FOR SECURING LATH T0 STUDDING OR THE LIKE Original Filed Feb. 4. 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet 1% lllmlllm M INVENTOR A/vosRs C. OLSEN.

ATTORNEY Patented May 2, 1944 OR THE LIKE Anders 0. Olsen, Forest Hills, N. Y.

Continuation of application Serial No. 254,588, February 4, 1939. This application May 30, 1942, Serial No. 445,163

8 Claims.

This invention relates to building structures and particularly to wall and ceiling constructions. The present application is a continuation of my co-pending application Serial No. 254,588, filed February 4, 1939.

The invention more particularly relates to partitioning means for the interiors of buildings, which may be applied either to finished interiors or, as original installations, to the framework of buildings under construction.

In the interior construction of modern buildings the use of wood laths and metal lathing of various types is being rapidly superseded by the employment of panelling, such as panelling composed of plasterboard known as gypsum lath, and of relatively soft and porous fiberboard known as insulating lath, as a base for the application of the plaster to the wall and ceiling surfaces of the rooms. Such panelling lath has been found superior to the old wood lathing in ease of installation, in the elimination of excess plaster, and in permanence and durability.

Thus, where wood framing is employed, a more fire retarding construction may be insured by the application of gypsum lath or panelling, before applying the plaster to the interior walls and ceilings of such structures. With panelling which consists of fiberboard of the character described, a desired degree of heat insulation is obtained.

The principal object of the invention is to make the use of this panelling or lathing more convenient, economical and permanent. To that end, the present invention contemplates the provision of certain novel and improved means for afiixing lathing panels to the studs, joists or other parts of the framing.

More particularly,-it is an object of the invention to provide a novel clip or securing element which is adapted to engage margins of the lathing panels and firmly, but resiliently, hold them in position in relation to the studs, joists or other parts of the framing. The clips constructed according to the inven tion are resilient and are adapted to provide a full floating structure, permitting certain relative movement of the lathing with relation to the studding or other framework so as to reduce the liability of the subsequently applied plaster to crack. With this floating or non-rigid securing feature, the joists or studs are free toshrink, warp or twist without setting up any strains on the lathing which would give rise to the formation of cracks in the subsequently applied plaster coatings.

Other objects and features of novelty will be apparent from the following specification, when read in connection with the accompanying drawings in which certain embodiments of the invention are illustrated.

In the drawings, Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a section of a partition or wall, wherein plastering lath panels are affixed to the studs by means of one form of clip embodying my invention;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of one of the fastening clips shown in Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is a detailed View, partly in cross-sec tion and partly in elevation,of one of the clips and the panelling affixed thereby to a stud;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view showing the manner of affixing the lathing panels to a stud by means of the clips of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a view showing another form of clip embodying the invention;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary view showing the use of the clip of Fig. 5 for securing lathing panels to wood joists in the construction of a ceiling; and

Fig. 7 is a view showing still another form of clip embodying my invention, for afiixing lathing panels to a stud or like framing member.

Referring to the drawings, the numeral ID in-- dicates the wood studs forming part of a wall or the joists forming part of a ceiling, and the numeral I I indicates panels comprising the plastering base or lath for subsequently applied layers of plaster. These panels may be gypsum lath, fiber insulating lath, or other panelling lath. These panels may be of the usual commercial size, say 48" x 16", so as to enable adjacent laths to be butted along their transverse edges approximately along the center of the studs or joists, in accordance with standard practice.

The attachment of the panels to the studs, in accordance with my invention, is attained by means of resilient clips, one form of which is 11- lustrated generally by the numeral I5 in Figs. 1 to 4. Referring to thesefigures, the clip there shown comprises a single piece of hard drawn wire bent along its central portion to form an open arcuate loop I6. The legs I! of the loop may be curvedsinuously as indicated at I 8 and I9, although, if desired, these legs. may :be more or less straight and extend substantiallyparallel with one another from the upper part ZIlof the loop to the outerends of the legs. 'At the lower ends I9 of the legs, the wire is reversely'bent at 22, the reverse bent. portions 23 lying substantially in the same plane as the legs I! of theloop. The reverse bent portions 23 extend to approximately the middle of the length of the legs H, as indicated at 24, at which point the ends of the wire are bent at right angles to the portions 23 to form arms 24*, the extremities of which are bent into the form of inwardly extending hooks 25 sharpened at their ends to provide prongs. The length of the wire is such that when bent into the form illustrated and described, the pronged hooks 25 will lie at a distance from the loop less than the depth of the studs, joists or other'parts of the framework to which the panelling is to be secured by the clips and the distance between the arms 24 will be slightly greater than the width of the studs or joists. However, by reason of the flexibility of the wire of which the clip is formed, the spacing between the arms 24*? andconseduently between the pronged hooks 25, may be enlarged or diminished to accommodate the clips to studs, joists or other framing members of greater or less width, by exerting a pulling or pushing strain on the arms relative to one another, thereby spreading apart or bringing closer together the legs '24 and return bent portions 23, to the desired extent.

In v using these clips for securing the lathing panels to "the framework, as indicated in Fig. 4, the 24 are placed over an edge H of a panel'that crosses the stud or over the edges N of a pair of adjacent "panels that meet at. the stud, and by slight inward pressure on the arms 2 1. the prongs at the extremities thereof are caused to bite into the surfaces of the studs or joists which lie in planes at right angles to the panelling, filed filler surfaces or the loop is and the eyes'f'ofm'ed by the lower ends 19 of the loops, the return bends '22 and the portions 23 firmly contacting the outer surface of the lathing panels, thereby pressing and maintaining the panels in contact 'wi'ththe outer edge of the stud or joist. The adjacentpanel 'll may then be moved, in the dire'tioh indicated by the arrow into positionin the space between the outer surface of the stud or joistand the upper or outer portion 'of-the loopsof fthe clips extending beyond the edges 1 I or l l of the panelor panels already held therelo to the stud, so that it also is forced into and held; in engagement with the outer surface of the stud-by that portion of the loops of the previously applied clips.

It will be observed that by reason of the construction of the arms 24}? and the pronged hooks 25 thereoL any; outward force exerted upon the panels or the clips will cause the prongs to becomefurther embedded; inthe opposite side surfaces of thestud or joist. However, by reason of the resilient relationship between loop l6 and the embedded prongs. of the arms 24%, any slight movements of thestuds or joists which may be caused by warpin v twisting, or by expansion or. contraction, will notbe transmitted to the panels.

, Thus, the panels secured by the clips to the studs or joists constitute a panelling surface that has a sufificiently freesfloatihg character to prevent cracking in the superposed coatings or plaster, under the force ofa'ny suchmov'ement.

Another embodiment of the invention is illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6. A's-there'shown, I provide a clip in which the baseor panel seizing portion 30, corresponding generally in its function to the loop ['6 and theeyesbetween the loop and the'extensions 23; of the-clip shown in Figs. 1 to 4, comprises por'tie'ns of the wire bent in zigzag form, -thebranches31"to 85 of the zigzag base extending in a common plane with one another and with terminal portions 36, 31 of the base. These terminal portions, extending in opposite directions respectively from the branches 3|, 35, are positioned approximately midway the transverse dimension of the base. Consequently, the bends 39, 4| and 43 are positioned on one side of the portions 38, 31 and bends 4D, 42 are positioned on the opposite side thereof, at substantially an equal distance, and the transverse distance between the series of bends 39, M, 53 and the bends 40, 32 are such that they will be able to straddle the joint between two adjacent lathing panels and extend for a substantial distance, say /2" to 1'', over the surfaces of the panels at each side of such joint.

'At the 'outer ends of the terminal portions 36, '31, the wire is bent at right angles to the plane of the base portion, forming arms 44, Q5 termimating in pronged hooks 65, 51 respectively. The portions of the wire constituting the arms M, are bent intermediate the length thereof into one or more curved portions '48, and 49, 5!, the curved portions on each of the arms lying in planes substantially parallel to each other, i. e. parallel to the surfaces of the studs or joists into which the pronged hooks will be embeddedin use. This formation of the. wire, intermediate the lengths of the arms M, '45 imparts a resilient quality to these arms which enhances the floating character of lathingpane'ls held to a supporting structure by these clips, enabling the lathing panels to have substantial freedom of movement independently of the supporting structure.

In Fig. 6 I have shown the clip of Fig. 5 employed for securing several adjacent lathing panels 54, to a joist 55, in forming a lathing surface of a ceiling. As indicated in this figure, the arms 44, lilv of the clip are positioned in the joint between the edges of the adjacent panels where these panels cross the joist 56, the prongs 46, d! piercing th opposite sides of the joist and the transversely extending base portion '39 of the clip straddling the joint between the adjacent panels and bearing up against the margins thereof so as to hold the panels in engagement with the joist. By reason of the zigzag portions 48, 59 and. 49, 5|, any movement of the panels away from the bottom edge of the joist due to shrinkage etc., will be accommodated.

It will be understood, of course, that the clip shown in Figs. '5 and6 may be employed equally as well for securing lathing, panels to vertical studs, in much the 'same 'manner as is. illustrated in Figs. 1 to 4.

Still another form of clip. embodying my invention is illustrated inFig. 7. In this form of clip, the wire is. bent to provide a base-- portion comprising two'circular loops. or'eyes fill, Si connected by the intermediate portion ofthe wire 62. The wire is bent substantially radially towards the center of th eyes 60, 6|, and'a slight inclination to the eyes on one. sidethereof as indicated at 63, 64 respectively; From the outer endsof the bentportions 63;64 the wire extends on the opposite side of ther yes to form'the arms 8?, 6B lying in'a plane atright angles-to the plane of e ey s a d 'havi p 'onged hooks 69, 10st plane of the eyes 69, 6| in the direction opposite to that in which the arms 61, 68 extend.

With each of the several forms of clips embodying my invention as herein illustrated and described, the base portion of the clips lying on the outer surface of the lathing panels will serve also as a key for the plaster coatings. Moreover, the arms extending at right angles to the base of the clips for gripping engagement with the studs, joists or other framing members function automatically to space the adjacent edges of the lathing panels a distance equal to the gauge of the wire from which the clips are formed, thereby permitting the subsequently applied plaster coatings to key into these spaces.

I claim:

1. A clip for fioatingly securing lathing panels to wood studding or the like, said clip comprising a pair of spaced arms having pronged hooks at the free ends thereof and an intermediate base portion connecting said arms, the arms lying substantially in a common plane intermediate opposite ends of the base portion, and the base portion lying in a plane at a right angle to the plane of said arms.

2. A clip for floatingly securing lathing panels to wood studding or the like, said clip comprising a base portion adapted to straddle the joint between adjacent panels and to bear resiliently against the same, said clip being formed with arms extending substantially in a common plane at a right angle to the plane of said'base portion, said arms having pronged hooks at the outer ends thereof and being located intermediate opposite ends of the base portion.

3. A clip for floatingly securing lathing panels to wood studding or the like, comprising a base portion for bearing against margins of panelling mounted against said studding, and a pair of resiliently spaced arms lying in a common plane which extends substantially at a right angle to th plane of the base portion substantially midway the transverse dimension thereof, said arms having pronged hooks at the extremities thereof adapted to pierce opposite surfaces of the studding.

4. A clip for securing lathing panels to wood studding or the like, comprising a base portion for bearing against margins of panelling mounted against said studding, and resiliently formed arms having pronged hooks at the extremities thereof adapted to pierce opposite surfaces of the studding, said arms being bent to provide resiliency in the direction of the length of the arms.

5. A clip for floatingly securing lathing panels to wood studding or the like, said clip comprising a single piece of wire bent to form an intermediate base portion, the wire being bent at the ends of said base portion to provide a pair of resiliently spaced arms extending substantially in a common plane at a right angle to the base portion intermediate the transverse dimension of the base portion, the outer ends of the arms having pronged hooks.

6. A clip for floatingly securing lathing panels to wood studding or the like, comprising a single piece of wire bent sinuously along the intermediate portion thereof to provide a base, the wire being bent at the ends of said base portion to form arms extending at right angles thereto, said arms terminating in prongs.

7. A clip for fioatingly securing lathing panels to wood studding or the like, said clip comprising a single piece of wire bent into the form of an open loop and into eyes connected to the outer ends of the loop, said loop and said eye portions providing a base portion for the clip adapted to bear against the surface of the lathing panels mounted on the studding or the like, the wire being bent at the outer ends of the eyes to provide arms extending at right angles to the plane of the base portion, the extremities of the arms having pronged hooks.

8. A clip for floatingly securing lathing panels to wood studding or the like, comprising a single piece of wire bent along its midportion to provide a pair of spaced substantially circular loops forming a base portion, the wire being bent radially near the end of each of said loops in a direction inclined from the plane of the loops, the ends of the wire extending from said radial portions in a direction substantially at right angles to the plane of the loops to provide spaced arms, the arms having pronged hooks at the outer extremities thereof.

ANDERS C. OLSEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2676679 *Jun 26, 1948Apr 27, 1954Manley R PriceJoint construction
US2816436 *Mar 19, 1954Dec 17, 1957United States Gypsum CoFurred wall construction
US2921464 *Mar 10, 1955Jan 19, 1960Olsen Anders CBuilding structure clip means
US3971224 *Nov 20, 1974Jul 27, 1976Erwin ElkuchMethod for erecting a pile wall adapted to take compressive forces and a pile wall produced by the method
US4569172 *Jun 16, 1982Feb 11, 1986Weinar Roger NInterior corner construction for wallboard, ceiling and partition panel assemblies, and backer clips therefor
US4578922 *Sep 30, 1983Apr 1, 1986United States Gypsum CompanyWire impaling clip for gypsum panels
US5941890 *Jun 26, 1998Aug 24, 1999Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Implantable surgical marker
US6425903May 9, 2000Jul 30, 2002James W. VoegeleImplantable surgical marker
EP1427900A1 *Sep 7, 2001Jun 16, 2004Hick, Robert MainlandWeather strips
EP1775399A1 *Sep 27, 2006Apr 18, 2007VetisolHook element and wall cladding therefor
WO2011144316A2 *May 16, 2011Nov 24, 2011Wuensch WilfriedArrangement for fastening profiles
Classifications
U.S. Classification411/457, 52/362
International ClassificationE04B2/84, E04B2/74, E04B2/72
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2002/726, E04B2/7457, E04B2/723, E04B2/842, E04B2/7411
European ClassificationE04B2/84P, E04B2/74C5C