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Publication numberUS2348223 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1944
Filing dateFeb 9, 1942
Priority dateFeb 9, 1942
Publication numberUS 2348223 A, US 2348223A, US-A-2348223, US2348223 A, US2348223A
InventorsMichael W Papesh
Original AssigneeRuberoid Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ornamental granular-faced composition shingle
US 2348223 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 9, 1944.v M. w. PAPEsH 2,348,223

ORNAMENTALv GRANULAR-FAOED COMPOSITION SHINGLE l Filed Feb 9, 1942 'V v INVENTOR. v Maf/AEL //I/. PAP/5.9M

BYl

ATTORNEY patterns. To obtain the desired. variegatedcolor to obtain the desired variegated .colorjo'r tone man@ 9,1944v 2,348,223 .i

i 2,343,223'r E.

.ORNAMENTAL GBANULAn-'FACEU COMPOSITION SINGLE. wT Michael W. Papeshrj Joliet;` Illigg'assignoritoflrhe Ruberoid Co., New York, N.'Y.,a corporationof New Jersey H App1iati0nrbfusry 9, 194g',- Vserial n 4`3o,o54j f 1 v 47 Claims. (cl. 10s-"7) 'M z This invention relates to ornamental granulara'coveringiforined of Shing/'les' embodying fthe infaced composition shingles, and to acovering of vention' and ;l such shingles laid in overlapping courses. f Fi'gTQZ lis aj face vievvoffa 'hin'g1e, in-"the orm Composition shingles are made from sheet ina? of al" strip-shingle; showing theff lcrnai'e'ntation terial consisting of a ilexible felt foundation '5 `diag'rammatically.` i *l which is saturated and coated with 'waterproof- "Itjs to be understood hat lthe"presentinven. ing substances, such as asphalt or the like,.and gtionjfis not Concerned dlfiily ivththe forni fOr which is faced on its coated upper surface; 'or constructionfof "the shingle' per se,y a'ndth'ffit at least the portion thereof that is intendedmto` mayibeeinboded inshingles'madethersmthe be exposed to the weather, with colored mineral y1o form c funitst or' strips: 'of any-suitable siefbor granules. The shingles -are formed bycutting 'conguratiom i i l y* the sheet into units or strips of various sizes and p 'ljlie shingle !,B illustrated in* Fig;v 2 isa' represhapes. sentation fofanordinary'compositionorf"asphalt While such shingles have been used*` extensivest ripgshingledfthe square-butttypehavingthree 1y for covering the roofs and sidesof `.building l5 rectangular'jshingle4liketabs H', I2 and-'lag sepstructures, they are subject to the objection that jaratedbyslots M tl'ia't7 representltheus'ual? spaces they present a monotonous unvarying appearance when laid. n,

It has been proposed to overcomelthisuobjecl a;lgroundvviziils`` or' backgroundfi' tion by facing the shingles with granule'sjof two 20 ofjni'nelaflfgi'uls'i "f fa single -prevailingJ-color or more colors and texturing the granular-faced i surface in simulation of wood-graining' orjother or tone eiect, it has heretofore beendeenied necessary to face the coated surface initiallyvfi/th 25 it usuallyy forms a zone extendingfsfrom'fthe lower granules of a variety of colors., shades andblends. `lv'edgfef- 'p adsf-itbapoint bbutgbnevinch above This has occasioned manufacturing difilculti'es, heu f mezgroundwork has presented storage problems in *keeping the ifht'sfelatwelyqmex; various colored granules separate, an d"-" h a"`ji creased the cost of production, particularly since effect it has been necessary to use large divi/ antities of relativelyexpensive artificialir granules of different colors and shades.

I have made the surprising discovery variegated tone or shade effect may beat simply and inexpensively by initially'facingifthe sheet with a groundwork of coloredl granlesl of a single basic or predominant color; suc f d ural green or red granules, and thenornameiitin'gfm regularly spaced intervalsiover-cangreaqfgauethe surface in successive areas with a teittufie of '"iiing substantiallyito thatmgavtabggndgusugroups of narrow stripesof sranulesofhdes :1, nbghfnotineessariiyscbextensivemtmthe or colors different from that of the-groundwork. This produces the unexpected result'that@g1-the groundwork itself, in the severalareasl respective-il"- ly, appears to be of diierent shades of -theffbasic Y color. A covering composed of such shinglesfap- 'mie'. wip. hinglsizghqwn 1n Fi plied in overlapping courses presents 'the optical i' bf hfHWKinchesgwideeamhamgvanillusion of being formed 0f shinglesl of dierent f ously from about nfteen to nineteen strips of shades, thus giving a variegated tone effectwith 50? from I, to :Anch widths, f one c0101-, distribthe use of a plurality of shingles having a grounduted over its surface. The stripes cover,v on the Y I design otheri'suitable'rpattern. 'is forme of groups tripesiol'l,

oloredlrnineralfgranule hestripes mori; of but a single color.- Y average, -not more' than about one-third of the The invention is illustrated in the accompanytotal area of the tab. These dimensions and ing drawing in which: proportions are illustrative and subject to varia- Figure J.v represents a conventional section of 55 tion. However,'inthe covering as a. whole the ratio of the stripes to the total area of the groundwork should be such that the colorof the groundwork at the intervals between the stripes, in the area of each group, will illusorily appear to be of a shade different from its real color.

Where the groundwork is faced with granules of 4a single prevailing color, for example, natural green granules, the group of stripes I1 on the tab Il may all Abe of one color or shade different from the groundwork, for example, a darker green, the group I8 on tab I2 all of another different color or shade, for example grayish green or gray, and the group I9 on the tab I3 all of still a different color4 or shade, for example, a lighter green than the groundwork. The particular sequence in which the colors of the three groups of stripes follow one another is unimthe same order should preferably throughout in the manufacture of v stripes severally being of different colors or l. An ornamented composition shingle a groundwork of granules of a single prevailing color upon at least that portion of its surface which isintended to be exposed when the shn.v

gie is laid, the groundwork having an ornamental pattern applied thereto composed of a plurality of groups of stripes of colored granules, the stripes of each group being of one color or shade different from that of the stripes of the adjacent groups and'from that of the groundwork, whereby the color of the groundwork in the intervals between the stripes of each group is illusorily modified in tone.

2. An ornamented composition shingle having a groundwork of granules of a single prevailing color upon at least that portion of its s'urface which is intended to be exposed when the shingle is laid, the groundwork having an ornamental` pattern applied thereto composed of a plurality of successive groups of `stripes of colored granules covering not more than approximately `one-third of the total area of the groundwork,

the stripes of each group being of one color or shade different from that of the stripes of the adjacent groups and from that of the groundwork, whereby the color of the groundwork in the .intervals between Athe stripes of each group 1s musei-uy modmed in tone.

3. An ornamental covering for a building structure, comprising a plurality of shingles laid in overlapping courses, all of the shingles having a groundwork of granules of a single prevailing color on at least that portion of the 'surface of eachthat is exposed to the weather, and each having an ornamental'pattern composedrof at least one group of stripes of colored granules ofcachgroun v shades and different from that of the groundwork, whereby the real prevailing color of the groundwork is illusorily modiiled in tone in the intervals between the stripes of each group.

4. An ornamental covering for a building structure, comprising a plurality of shingles laid in overlapping courses, all ofv the shingles hav- .ing a groundwork of granules of a single prevailing color on at least that portion of the surtace of each which is exposed to the weather,

and each having an ornamental pattern composedfof at least one group of stripes of colored granulesapplied upon the groundwork to cover not more than about one-third of the total area of the latter, said group of stripes severally being of different colors or shades' andv different from that ofthe groundwork, whereby the real prevailing color of the groundwork is illusorily modided in tone in the intervals between the stripes of each group.

5. An ornamental covering for a building structure, comprising a plurality of shingles laid in overlapping courses, all of the shingles having a groundwork of granules of a single prevailing color on at least that portion of the surface of each which is exposed to the weather, and each having anornamental pattern composed of at least one group of stripes of colored gran- 'ules applied upon the'groundwork, said groups shades following one another successively inl each course but being out of registration with the corresponding groups of the courses immediately above and below, whereby a variegated tone effect is produced in which the real prevailing color of the groundwork is illusorily modined in tone in the intervals between the stripes of each group.

6. An ornamental granular-faced composition shingle'comprising a felt base saturated and coated with waterproofing substances and having a facing of mineral granules of a single piev'ailing color on its exposed surface, and having av plurality of groups of stripes of granules of different colors from that of the facing, the

stripes of each group being of one color but diiering in color from the stripes of the adjacent groups, whereby the color of the facing in the intervals between the'stripes of each group is illusorily modiiled in tone.

'1. An ornamental covering for a building structure comprising a plurality of granularfaced composition shingles laid in overlappinge each group being of one color but different from the color of the stripes of the adiacent groups, whereby the color of the facing is illusorily modined in tone in the intervals between the' stripes mcmm. w. PAPEsH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4188763 *Apr 6, 1978Feb 19, 1980Isola Fabrikker A/SRoofing shingle
US4195461 *Oct 19, 1978Apr 1, 1980Isola Fabrikker A/SRoofing shingle
US5747105 *Apr 30, 1996May 5, 1998Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology Inc.Traversing nozzle for applying granules to an asphalt coated sheet
US5766678 *Dec 30, 1996Jun 16, 1998Owens-Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for applying granules to an asphalt coated sheet to form a pattern having inner and outer portions
US5776541 *Dec 30, 1996Jul 7, 1998Owens-Corning Fiberglas TechnologyMethod and apparatus for forming an irregular pattern of granules on an asphalt coated sheet
US5795622 *Dec 30, 1996Aug 18, 1998Owens-Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Method of rotating or oscillating a flow of granules to form a pattern on an asphalt coated sheet
US6095082 *Mar 13, 1998Aug 1, 2000Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Apparatus for applying granules to an asphalt coated sheet to form a pattern having inner and outer portions
US6487828Jun 30, 2000Dec 3, 2002Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Tabbed shingles length cut at mid-tab
US7575701Feb 3, 2003Aug 18, 2009Shear Tech, Inc.Method of fabricating shake panels
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/557, D25/139, 52/518
International ClassificationE04D1/00, E04D1/26
Cooperative ClassificationE04D2001/005, E04D1/26
European ClassificationE04D1/26