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Publication numberUS2348337 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1944
Filing dateSep 22, 1941
Priority dateSep 22, 1941
Publication numberUS 2348337 A, US 2348337A, US-A-2348337, US2348337 A, US2348337A
InventorsHenry Francis Earl
Original AssigneeHenry Francis Earl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hypodermic projectile
US 2348337 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. H. FRANCIS I HYPODERMIC PROJECTILE Filed Sept 22 1941 May 9, 1944.

INVENTOR,

ATTORNEY.

Patented ay 1944 U i'i STAT S OFFICE Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in hypodermic projectile and has particular reference to a projectile suitable for carrying a hypodermic fluid for injection into a distant object.

The principal object of the present invention is the provision of a hypodermic projectile adapted to be projected from the barrel of a gun and to forcibly discharge a hypodermic fluid into a body contacted by the projected projectile.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a hypodermic projectile comprising a case in which is slidably mounted a hypodermic needle which partially extends from the outer end thereof and means for forcing a hypodermic fluid through said hypodermic needle as said projectile contacts a body member in the path of its travel.

Other objects of the invention are simplicity and economy of construction, efiiciency of operation and adaptability for use in any of the various types of power projectiles.

With these objects, in View, reference will now be had to th drawing wherein:

Figure 1 is an elevational view of a hypodermic projectile embodying this invention.

Fig. 2 is a rear end view of said projectile.

Fig. 3 is a front end view of the projectile.

Fig. 4 is a side elevation of an air gun suitable for projecting the projectile.

Fig. 5 is a sectional view of a portion of the air gun with the projectile, positioned therein, said projectile being shown in longitudinal sectional form.

Fig. 6 is an elevational view of the hypodermic needle and parts fixed thereto, partly in section.

Fig. '1 is an end view of the parts shown in Fig. 6.

Fig. 8 is an enlarged view, as shown in Fig. 7, with the chuck jaws compressed to release the power spring.

Fig. 9 is a modified form of the hypodermic projectile shown in longitudinal sectional view and positioned in the gun barrel.

Throughout the several views like reference characters refer to similar parts and the numeral I0 designates a projectile case or shell preferably made of a relatively soft metal such as lead alloys, etc., and having an open end l2 internally threaded at M to receive a plug l6 having a threaded boss l8 which operatively engages threads [4.

The outer portion ll of boss I8 is frusto-conical in shape and is recessed at 20 to receive the end of plunger 22 as clearly shown in Fig. 5.

is adapted to closely fit the side walls of the gun barrel 24 and due to the fact that this portion I1 is also made of a soft material it will conform to the shape of the barrel and if said gun barrel is rifled the rifling will engage said portion l1, thus causing the projectile to rotate so as to maintain a substantially constant longitudinal position during its course of travel.

The front end of case H) is provided with an annular rib 0r enlargement 26 which also snugly fits the inner contour of the barrel as shown.

An annular recess 28 is formed adjacent the front end ofcase ID to receive the open end of the needle cap 30 which is adapted to be forced therein to secure the'cap in position against accidental displacement.

The hypodermic needle 32 is cut on a biasat its one end to form a sharp point 34 and is threaded at its opposite end at 36 and is provided with an annular band 38 intermediate its ends. This needle is slidably mounted in the end wall 4i! of the case Hl through the opening 42.

The needle cap 30 is made of a relatively soft material such as lead, and is offset at 44 to engage the front wall of annular band 38 and is annularly depressed at is to engage the rear edge of band 38 thereby securing the needle against accidental movement relativ to the case Hi.

It Will be noted that the point 34 of the needle is made of a hard material such as steel and will penetrate and pass through said needle cap when the projectile contacts a body during its flight.

The threaded end of needle 32 engages the threaded socket 48 of piston 50 and is provided adjacent said piston with a transverse opening 52 which communicate with chamber 54 disposed between piston 5B and end wall in case This frusto-conical portion flares outwardly and 55 Ill when the needle is in the normal position as shown in Fig. 5.

Piston 50 is provided with a rearwardly extending stem 56 terminating in a frusto-conical head 58 to form shoulders 60. This stem is diametrically slotted at M to form chuck jaws 66. A ring member 68 is adapted to be forced over the frusto-conical head 58 to engage the shoulder 60 and when so positioned will support the compression spring 10 against the rear wall of piston 58 as'shown in Fig. 5. The reduced portion of head 53 normally rests in an annular recess 12 formed in boss l8 and is so related thereto that as the needle 32 is forced rearwardly into said recess due to the impact against a body member it will cause the chuck jaws to be forced together as shown in Fig. 8 so as to reduce the effective diameter of shoulders 60, thereby permitting the ring 68 to slip thereover due to the action of compression spring 70, which will pass over the head 58.

The inclined Wall 21 of rib 25 terminates in groove 28 so that as cap 30 is forced rearwardly the open end of the cap will be enlar ed to freely move away from case H] as the needle is moved outwardly relative to case It.

When ring 68 is thus released the spring 10 will force the piston 58 forwardly thereby forcing the hypodermic fluid contained within chamber 54 through opening 52 and into needle 32 thence into the body which has been penetrated by the hypodermic needle. It should be kept in mind that the needle cap is made of a soft material, such as lead, and will be forced rear.- wardly from the end of the needle as the needle penetrates the end wall of the body member thereby insuring definite delivery of the hypodermic fluid to said body.

An opening 14 formed through the wall of case It! communicates with the recess 16 formed in said case to the rear of the piston 50 thereby permitting free movement of the piston and without creating any objectionable vacuum.

A typical type of air gun suitable for projecting this particular type of projectile is shown in fragmentary detail in Fig. 5. The usual compression chamber 18 in which the air is compressed by any of the usual means delivers air through the check valve 88 to compression chamber 82 and a valve 86 controlling a passageway 85 leading to the chamber 88 formed between the plunger 22 and the rear end of portion I1 is operable by means of tumbler 9!! which is operable in the usual manner, not shown,'by trigger 92. When it is desired to fire the projectile the operator simply pulls back on trigger e2 to force valve 3 downwardly thereby permitting the flow of compressed air to the rear of boss l8 which will cause the projectile to be discharged from the gun barrel 24. The spring 94 normally holds valve 8G in the closed position.

The projectile, as shown, is on a larger scale than would normally be used in actual practice, however, in some instances it might be desirable to use projectiles of various sizes.

The chamber 54 and needle 32 are filled with any desirable liquid and then the cap 3! is positioned over the outer end of the needle crimped at 46 and at 96 to hermetically seal the chamber 54 and to preclude objectionable air pockets within the needle or chamber 54.

Referring now to the modified form, shown in Fig. 9, the needle cap liill is made of sufiiciently strong material to hold the needle against outward movement due to the force of compression spring- [82 which is positioned between boss [8 and piston l 04.

In this structure when the needle contacts a body in its flight the flared portion I06 of needle cap we will be forced rearwardlly against the conical wall I98 of the end portion of case l0 thereby spreading the rearward end of the cap so that it will not engage the recess 28 formed in the outer extremity of the case thus permitting the needle to be forced outwardly by the action of spring 52 to discharge the hypodermic ma? terial through needle 32 and into said body member as described above.

t is quite apparent that the projectile above described is adapted to be projected from a barrel having a substantially cylindrical bore and that said projectile will maintain a substantially constant position relative to the direction of travel due to its symmetrical form. and that it will operate to discharge a fluid into a body pierced by the needle in its path of travel.

What I claim as new and desire to cover by Letters Patent is:

1. A hypodermic projectile comprising a case having an opening through its outer end wall; a hypodermic needle having a side opening slidably mounted in the end wall of said case and projecting outwardly therefrom; a piston fixed to the inner end of said needle and positioned in spaced relation to said end wall to form a fluid chamber therehetween; a spring; means securing said spring under compression in operative relation with said piston; and means operable when said needle is forced inwardly into said case to release said compression spring securing means whereby said spring expands to cause a relative movement of said piston and case to cause a fluid to flow from said chamber outwardly through said needle.

EVA hypodermic projectile comprsing an elongated case having annular rings adjacent its opposite ends to contact the inner bore of a gun barrel and having an apertured end wall; a hy podermic needle having a transverse opening ad jacent its inner end and being slidably mounted in said apertured end wall and projecting outwardly therefrom; a piston fixed to the inner end .of said needle and positioned in spaced relation to said end wall to form a chamber for fluid therebetween; a resilient member secured under compression against said piston by means including a ring member carried by said piston operable as said needle is forced further into said case, to release said'spring whereby it is permitted to expand to cause said piston to move relative to the case and force a fluid from said chamber outwardly through said needle.

3. A hypodermic projectile comprising a hollow case having an opening through its outer end wall; a hypodermic needle having a transverse opem'ng slidably mounted through said opening in said end wall and projecting outwardly therefrom; a piston fixed to the inner end of said needle and positioned in spaced relation to the end wall of said case to form a fluid chamber about said needle; a spring secured under compression in operative relation with said piston within said hollow case; and means operable when said needle is forced inwardly into said case to release aid compression spring securing means whereby said spring is permitted to expanel to cause a relative movement of said piston p H casetocause fluid to flow from said chamber outwardly through said needle.

4. A hypodermic projectile comprising an elongated case having an'apertured end wall; a hypodermic needle having a transverse opening ad.- jacent its inner end and being slidably mounted said end wall and extending outwardly therefrom; a piston fixed at the inner end of said needle and positioned in spaced relation to said end wall to form a chamber ,for fluid therebetween-,1 a resilient member secured under compression against said piston by means including a ringmember carried by said piston operable as said needle is forced further into said case, to release said spring whereby it is permitted to expand to cause said piston to move relative .to the case and force a fluid from said chamber outwardly through said needle.

A hypodermi projectile co risin an elongated e ha i anth t d end wall; atti od rmiq eecl s h i a ans erse opening adto release said spring whereby it is permitted to expand to cause said piston to move relative to the case and force a fluid from said chamber outwardly through said needle; and a cap of relatively soft material secured to the forward end of said case to normally cover the outer end portion of said needle.

EARL HENRY FRANCIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2620190 *Nov 10, 1947Dec 2, 1952Donald BeanTip for darts and arrows
US2669230 *Jul 30, 1947Feb 16, 1954Becton Dickinson CoInjection apparatus
US2832339 *Sep 2, 1953Apr 29, 1958Potter Pharmaceutical CorpHypodermic injector
US2854925 *Jul 23, 1957Oct 7, 1958Palmer Chemical & Equipment CoProjectile for delivery of drugs to animals
US2923243 *Mar 24, 1958Feb 2, 1960Palmer Chemical & Equipment CoProjectile for liquid drug delivery to animals
US2995373 *Mar 22, 1960Aug 8, 1961Cox Jack RHypodermic projectile
US3006649 *Jul 11, 1958Oct 31, 1961Southwest Res InstAnimal immobilizer
US3022785 *Aug 8, 1957Feb 27, 1962Crockford Jack AMethod of delivering drugs into animals
US3114370 *Feb 23, 1962Dec 17, 1963Kayler Roy ASyringe
US3379176 *Oct 20, 1965Apr 23, 1968Miller Herman IncLivestock identification method and apparatus
US3386381 *Jul 6, 1966Jun 4, 1968Thomas E. FerbHypodermic projectile
US3396660 *Mar 16, 1966Aug 13, 1968Jack The Yeoman Sales LtdHypodermic darts
US3417697 *Oct 19, 1966Dec 24, 1968Gen Precision Systems IncProjectile
US3745682 *Sep 28, 1971Jul 17, 1973Pneu Dart IncGun for propelling a drug or medicine projectile
US4106770 *Sep 1, 1976Aug 15, 1978Gray John MHypodermic syringe projectile
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US5202533 *Jan 28, 1992Apr 13, 1993Vandersteen Douglas G ADrug injection apparatus for an animal
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US5785680 *Aug 8, 1996Jul 28, 1998Texas Instruments IncorporatedInjector and object to be injected by the injector
US6524286Mar 25, 1999Feb 25, 2003Gordon O. HelmsMedical application system for animals
DE1121976B *Jul 28, 1960Jan 11, 1962Fritz FeigPressluftgewehr mit einstellbarer Geschossgeschwindigkeit, insbesondere zum Verschiessen von Projektilen fuer die Abgabe von Drogen an Tiere
Classifications
U.S. Classification102/512, 124/61, 473/581, 604/130
International ClassificationF42B12/02, F42B12/54
Cooperative ClassificationF42B12/54
European ClassificationF42B12/54