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Publication numberUS2349701 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1944
Filing dateJun 26, 1941
Priority dateJun 26, 1941
Publication numberUS 2349701 A, US 2349701A, US-A-2349701, US2349701 A, US2349701A
InventorsButtikofer John W
Original AssigneeButtikofer John W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hospital bed
US 2349701 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1944- J. w. BUTTIKOFER E"l'AL I ,7

HOSPITAL BED Filed June 26, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 EIIHHIHI mimunw/ f INVENTOR.

7(MM6/6W ATTORNEY y 1944. J. w. BUTTIKOFER ETAL 2,349,701

HOSPITAL BED Filed Jun 2a. 1941 2 Shets-Shet 2 INVENTOR.

BY If M ATTORNEY Patented May 23, 1944 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE HOSPITAL BED John W. Buttikofer, New Rochelle, N. Y. Application June 26, 1941, Serial No. 399,851

2 Claims.

The present invention relates to hospital beds and more particularly to a motor operated hospital bed.

Hospital beds in use at the present time generally comprise upright head and foot end members connected by side members upon which is mounted a spring that is hinged at suitable points so that it may be adjusted in height to support the back and legs of a person. The back and leg supports are adjustable in height by manually operable cranks. The cranks are in most cases located adjacent the foot ends of the beds and in some cases at the side of a bed. Hospitals and institutions generally prefer to have the cranks located at the foot ends of the beds so that in a ward nurses or attendants may adjust the heights of all the beds from a central aisle. In neither of these types of bed is a bedridden patient able himself to adjust the positions of the back and leg supports; he must wait until an attendant is available to adjust the height of the supports by means of the cranks. This is at times very trying on both the patient and an attendant for the patient is uncomfortable and the attendant may be occupied with tasks which are at the moment more important than adjusting a bed.

If a patient is confined to his home, the dimculties may beincreased in the event he is left alone in the house for any length of time. In this event there is no one to adjust the bed and for a patient to get out of bed and attempt it may aggravate his illness or injury.

The present invention aims to overcome the above and other objections by providing a new and improved means for adjusting the positions of the back or leg supports of a hospital bed which may be easily operated by a patient without getting out of bed. The invention further contemplates the provision of hospital bed operating means which may be easily and inexpensively manufactured and installed in new hospital beds or in those already in use.

An object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved hospital bed.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved hospital bed adapted to be operated by a patient without getting out of bed.

Another object of the invention is to provide a motor operated hospital bed which is inexpensive to manufacture.

Another object of the invention is to provide a motor operated unit for hospital beds which may be easily and rapidly installed into hospital beds during the manufacture thereof.

A further object of the invention is to provide a motor operated unit for hospital beds which may be easily installed into existing manually operated beds.

Other and further objects of the invention will be obvious upon an understanding of the illustrative'embodiment about to be described, or

will be indicated in the appended claims, and various advantages not referred to herein will occur to one skilled in the art upon employment pf the invention in practice.

A preferred embodiment of the invention has been chosen for purposes of illustration and description and is shown in the accompanying drawings, forming a part of the specification, wherein Fig. 1 shows a side elevational view of a hospital bed embodying the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary top plan view showing a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 3-4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is an elevational view showing the preferred embodiment of the present invention;

.Fig. 5 is an elevational view showing a modified form of the present invention; and

Fig. 6 illustrates a preferred form of wiring diagram for the motor operated hospital bed shown in the prferrediigures.

Referring again to the drawings, and more particularly to Figs. 1 and 2 thereof, there is shown a hospital bed having head and foot members I and 2 and side members 4 and 5. A back support 1 is pivotally secured adjacent one end 8 thereof to a flange ID on the side member so that it may swing about the pivot point 8. A bell crank H pivotally secured at I; to a suitable bracket or cross'rod has one end M thereof connected with the back support I and its other end It connected with an operating rod H. The leg support comprises separate sections I9 and 20 each pivotally secured together at adjoining ends 22 thereof, the section l9 being movable about its lower pivoted end 23by a second operating rod 25 through a bell crank 26 which is pivotally secured intermediate its ends to a bracket or cross rod 28. The free end of the leg supporting section 20 is preferably provided with rollers 29 at each side thereof which ride on the side members 4 and 5 of the bed during movement of the leg support. An electric motor 3| mounted on the bed frame adjacent the foot of the bed is adapted to actuate the operating rods parts to form a unitary member.

l1 and 25 to raise and lower the back or leg suports. p The motor 3| which actuates the operating rods I! and 25 to move the back and leg supports is preferably mounted, together with the means for operatively connecting it with the operating rods, one. base member 32. Preferably the motor is of the three wire, reversible type. The base member 32, together with the motor 3| and the means for connecting it so as to move the back and leg supports, forms a single compact unit which may be manufactured and supplied to hospital bed manufacturers as a complete unit ready for installation. The motor 3| is connected with the operating rod I! for moving the back support I through suitable spee'd reducing means such as gear box 34, rotatable shaft 35, a clutch member mounted on the shaft 35 comprising cooperating clutch sections 31 and 38, fixed and movable, respectively, sprocket 40, drive chain or belt 4|, and a sprocket 43 mounted on an extension 44 of the operating rod I1. The clutch member 38, and sprocket 45 may be formed from a single piece of material or may be built up into a unit from separate In Fig. 2 the cooperating clutch faces 31 and 38 are shown out of engagement with each other so that operation of the motor 3| will be ineffective to rotate the operating rod ll. The cooperating clutch sec-- tions 3'! and 38 may be moved into and out of engagement with each other by means of a yoke member 45 which fits into an annular groove 41 formed on or carried. by the unitary member which carries the clutch member 38 and the sprocket 40. The clutch member 31 is fixed to the shaft by a pin or key not shown. The shaft 35 connected with the gear box or speed reducing means 34 is fixed in position with respect to its longitudinal axis but is rotated by the motor 3| through the gear box 34. The unitary member which carries the clutch members 38 and sprocket 40 is free to move longitudinally along the shaft 35 and is also free to rotate about the shaft until it engages the other clutch section 31. When the clutch sections 31 and 38 are in engagement, the sprocket 40 will be rotated to thus move the chain or belt 4| and rotatethe sprocket 43. Turning the sprocket 43 rotates the operating rod extension and the screw member 35 which is connected therewith by a universal joint 49. R- tation of the screw member 35 raises and lowers the back support 1. The universal joint 49 permits the operating rod I! to move freely and change its angle while moving the back support "I. The operating rod extension 44 preferably extends to a point adjacent the foot end of the bed and is provided with a squared end or other means 45 adapted to receive a crank for raising and lowering the back support in an emergency. Such an emergency might be caused by temporary failure of the power supply for the motor 3| The operating rod for moving the leg support is connected with the motor 3| through the gear box 34, rotatable shaft 35, clutch members 50 and 52, fixed and movable, respectively, sprocket 53, chainor belt 55 and sprocket 56, axle 51, sprocket 58, chain or belt 55 and sprocket 59. A universal joint 24 is preferably provided for the screw member which moves the leg support, so that the operating rod 25 is free to move and change its angle when moving the leg support. Also, the shaft for the sprocket 59 may have a squared end 21 for receiving a crank so as to operate the leg support in an emergency. When the clutch sections 55 and 52 are in engagement, the operating rod 25 will be eflective to move the leg support and when these clutch sections are out of engagement, the motor II will be ineffective to move the leg support. The bushing or unitary member 5| which carries the clutch section 52 and sprocket 53 is preferably V provided with an annular groove 5| for receiving members at one side of through the operating a yoke member a. The clutch section 52 and sprocket 53 are movable longitudinally on the shaft and free to rotate about it until the clutch member is engaged. Movement of the yoke axially of the shaft 35 is effective to move the clutch sections 58 and 52 into and out of engagement.,,The clutch section is fixed to the shaft 35 by a key or a-pin not shown. Preferably the yoke members 45 and 45a are connected together adjacent their ends by a rod or bar 52 (Fig. 3) so that when either pair of the clutch the motor are in engagement the other pair of clutch sections will necessarily be out of engagement. In this way the.

motor 3| is effective to move only one of the supporting parts of the hospital bed at a time. The connecting bar 52 of the yoke members is in turn connected with operating means adapted to be moved by a patient, as will be described hereinafter.

It will be noted that the sprockets 40 and 43 which move the back support 1 through the operating rod I! are shown as directly connected by the chain or belt 4| and that the sprockets 53 and 59 which move the leg supports I9 and 25 rod 25,are shown connected through idler sprockets 55 and 58 and two belts or-chains 55 and 50. The idler sprockets 55 and 58. are shown to bring out a construction which may be utilized to operate the rod 25 in the event that obstructions prevent the placing of the large sprocket 55 directly upon the operating rod 25. The idler sprockets 55 and 58 may be omitted where desired and the sprocket 53 directly connected with the sprocket 59 on the operating rod 25.

When current is supplied to the motor 3| from a suitable power source, by closing the "up" side of a switch S, the motor will rotate in one direction and may be selectively connected with either the back or leg supports to raise them. When it is desired to lower the back and leg supports the current through the motor 3| is reversed by moving the switch S to the "down position. The motor.3| will then rotate in an opposite direction and the yokes may be moved to selectively engage the clutch faces for lowering either the back or leg supports. The switch S is preferably atached to a drop cord so that 'it may be placed in any convenient position for operation by a patient. Any suitable type of switch may be utilized. The operation of the switch S and the motor 3| will be more fully brought out in connection with the description of the wiring diagram illustrated in Fig. 6.

The yokes 45 and 45a for moving the clutches which connect either the back or leg support: with the motor 3| to raise or lower them, are connected with a hand lever 55, preferably located adjacent the head end of the bed so that it is within easy reach of a patient. The yokes and hand lever may be connected by a lever 51, pivotally secured intermediate its ends to a mounting post 58, and a rod 18. The hand lever 55 is secured intermediate itsends to a pivot 1| on the bed frame. Moving the hand lever about the adapted to prevent excessive upward and downward movement of the back and" leg supports. For example, when the yokes are moved to connect the clutch members 31 and 38 with the motor 3| to operate the back support I, the conextreme upper position the projection 16 thereon moves into contact with the limit switch L2 and interrupts the circuit to the motor. This will stop the operation of the motor and the back support will come to rest in its uppermost position.

When it is desired to move the back support downwardly the switch 8 will be moved to the left to close the "down contact. In this relation current will pass through the incoming power II4, through theswitch member S2, line 94, line 95, limit switch L|, lines 95 and 91 to contact 98.

- Contacts 98 and I00 will be connected since the tacts of the switch 14 are simultaneously. connected so as to put into the motor circuit the limit switches LI and L2 (Fig. 6). When the back rest has reached an extreme upper position it is desirable that the motor circuit be automatically interrupted to stop the operation of the motor 3|; the limit switch L2 performs this function. A similar feature is desirable when the head rest reaches an extreme lower position; the limit switch LI performs this function.

a projection or extension I6 which is adapted to move into contact with and operate the limit switches LI and L2 for cutting oi the motor 3|. Limit switches L3 and L4 are adapted to be similarly operated by a projection I8 on the leg supporting member I9, to stop the operation of the motor 3| when the leg support reaches an extreme upper or lower position.

In Fig. 5 there is illustrated a modified form of the invention which utilizes gears and connecting shafts instead of sprockets as the connesting means between the motor 3| and operating rods I1 and 25. The clutches, yokes, and other mechanism are constructed and operate similarly to the preferred embodiment. For example, in the modified form of the invention, the sprocket 53 is replaced by a bevel gear 19 that meshes with a bevel gear 80 mounted on a connecting rod 82. The other end of the connecting rod 82 is preferably provided with a bevel gear (not shown) similar to the gear 80 and meshes another bevel gear (not shown) mounted on the shaft which turns the operating rod 25. Movement of the yoke 46b along the squared surface 8| of .the shaft 35b engages or disengages the clutch members 50b to 52b similarly to the preferred embodiment.

Fig. 6 illustrates a form of wiring diagram that may be used with the present invention. It will first be assumed that the switch S is moved to the right to close the up" contact, and also that the switch I4 on the motor 3| has been set in position by means of the hand lever 65, to move the back support. Current from a power line II4 will pass through the switch member S2, line 83, limit switch L2 and line 84 to the contact 8B of the three-pole double-throw switch 14. The contacts 86 and 81 of the switch" will be connected since the hand lever 65 mounted adjacent the end of the bed has been operated by a patient to connect the motor circuit for moving the back support. From the contact 81 current will pass through line 88 to the motor 3|. From the motor 3| current will pass out through line 89, conductor 90 and line 9| to the returning power line 93. As the back support I reaches an The lower end of the back rest I is preferably provided with switch 14 on the motor has been actuated by the operating arm and connecting lever 81 so as.

to move the head support. The current will therefore pass from the contact 98 to the contact I00, through line IM to the motor 3 I. From the motor 3| current will pass to the returning power line 93 through lines 89, and 9|. As the back support reaches its extreme lower position the projection 15 at the lower end thereof will move into contact with the limit switch LI to interrupt the circuit and stop the'operation of motor 3|.

The-back rest I may be stopped at any desired position intermediate its extreme upper and lower positions by moving the switch S to the central position shown in Fig. 6.

When the hand lever 85 is moved by a patient to connect the motor with the leg support so as to raise and lower it, the operating will be as follows. Assume that theswitch S is moved to the right to close the "up" contact and connect the circuit for moving the leg support upwardly. In this relation current will pass from the incoming power line 4 through the switch member S2, line I02, limit switch L4 and line I04 to the contact I06. The contacts I06 and 81 will be connected since the hand lever 65 has been operated so as to move the contacts of the switch I4 into position to move the leg support. Current will therefore pass from the contact I06 to the contact 81, through lines 88 and 89, conductor 90 and line 9| to the returning power line 93. As the leg support reaches an extreme upper position the projection 18 thereon will move into contact with the limit switch L4 to interrupt the circuit and stop the motor 3|.

When the switch S is moved to the left to close 'the down" contact current will pass from the incoming power line 4 through the switch member S2, line 94, line I08, limit switch L3 and line I09 to the contact H0. The contacts 0 and I00 will be connected since the switch 14 on the motor is in position to operate the leg support. Current will therefore pass from the contact IIO to the contact I00, through line IN, the motor 3|, and lines 89, 90 and 9| to the returning power line. As the leg support reaches an extreme lower position the projection I8 thereon will move into contact with the limit switch L3 to interrupt the circuit and stop the motor. Moving the switch S to the central position shown in Fig. 6 is effective to stop the motor 3| and the leg support at any position intermediate the extreme upper and lower positions.

It is believed that the operation of the device will be clear from the foregoing description and that a further detailed description of the operation would be superfluous.

It will be seen that the present invention provides a new and improved motor operated hospital bed that is relatively simple in construction and operation. The motor, speed reducing means, clutches, controlling lever arm and idler sprockets may all be mounted on a single separate base member, and the base member installed with these parts as a unit. The unit may be readily installed in hospital beds during the manufacture thereof or may be easily installed in existing hospital beds to convert them to motor operation. The device is a boon to all users of hospital beds for with it the back and leg supports may be operated by a patient himself without getting out of bed. L

As various changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the parts herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention and without sacrificing any of its advantages, it is to be understood that all matter herein is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A compact unit for installation on commercial hospital beds which have a shaft for raising and lowering the foot of the bed and a second shaft for raising and lowering the head of the bed, in combination, a member adapted to extend transversely of the hospital bed and adapted to be attached to the sides thereof, a shaft mounted on said member, a device on said third-mentioned shaft adapted to be connected eluding a member adapted to extend to a position adjacent the head of the bed for selectively connecting said motor to either of said devices.

an electric cable adapted to extend to the head of the bed, and switch means at the end of the gable for operating saidmotor in either direc- 2. A compact unit for installation on commercial hospital beds which have a shaft for raise ing and loweringthe foot of the bed and another shaft for raising and lowering the head of the bed, in combination,.a member adapted to be secured to a hospital bed, a shaft mounted on said member, a device on said third-mentioned shaft adapted to be connected to operate the, shaft for raising and lowering the foot of the bed, a second device on said third-mentioned shaft adapted to be connected to operate the shaft for raising and lowering the head of the bed. a reversible motor mounted on said abovementioned member, means including a member adapted to extend to a position adjacent the head of the bed for selectively connecting said motor to either of said devices, electric connections adapted to extend to the head of the bed. switch means at the head of the bed in saidelectric connections for operating said motor in either direction, and switches effective upon the motor circuit adapted to be mounted on the bed and to be responsive to the position of the foot and the head of the bed to stop the motor when either the foot or the head of the bed has reached a predetermined upper or lower position.

JOHN W. BUTTIKOFER.

@ERTIFICATE 0F conmzcnou. Patent no; 2, 19,701. May 25, 191A.-

JOHN w. BU'ITIKOFER.

It is hereby certified thaterror appears 'in' above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: In the'heelding to the drawings, name of inventor, for; "J. u. BUTTIKOFER ET AL" read. --J. w.'BuTTIKoFER'--; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the sane may conform to the record of the case in the Patent- Office.

Signed and. sealed this 25th 11 of Jilly, A. 1). 191 4 Leslie Frazer (Sean Acting Commissioner of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2481477 *Jun 11, 1946Sep 6, 1949Walter E PeeryScrew and nut bed actuator
US2500738 *Jul 3, 1945Mar 14, 1950Beem FoundationInvalid's bed
US2520849 *Oct 22, 1945Aug 29, 1950Mcvicker Graham DVariable position bed
US2523076 *Jul 9, 1946Sep 19, 1950Sweetland Ernest JBed construction
US2536534 *Aug 27, 1947Jan 2, 1951Sydney CarterAdjustable bed and spring
US2605481 *May 18, 1946Aug 5, 1952Logan Burkhart ArchiePatient operated invalid bed
US2617117 *Feb 15, 1949Nov 11, 1952Campbell And CompanyElectrically operated invalid's bed
US2620489 *Jul 13, 1946Dec 9, 1952Holm Luther EHospital bed adjusting mechanism
US2625839 *Feb 24, 1950Jan 20, 1953Coleman Beamon VHand or power-operated actuating mechanism
US2630720 *Jul 26, 1948Mar 10, 1953Gambill Mfgrs IncBelt gearing
US2631300 *Jun 27, 1949Mar 17, 1953Murray Charles LPower-operated sectional invalid bed
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US2684488 *Feb 6, 1952Jul 27, 1954Lee SnyderAuxiliary driving unit for bed elevating mechanism of hospital beds
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US2972753 *Oct 3, 1955Feb 28, 1961Joseph R ThomasMotor operated bed davenport
US2996732 *Jan 12, 1959Aug 22, 1961Draper Nephi AContour bed
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US3061843 *Apr 18, 1960Nov 6, 1962SingerArticulated bed
US6826793Feb 5, 2003Dec 7, 2004Daniel R. TekulveArticulating bed frame
US7174588 *Dec 9, 2004Feb 13, 2007Li-Chieh ChenMedical chair having synchronously adjusting function
US7257850Oct 27, 2004Aug 21, 2007Med-Mizer, Inc.Articulating bed frame
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/616, 74/665.0GB, 5/618, 74/665.0GE
International ClassificationA47C20/08, A61G7/015, A61G7/002, A47C20/00, A47C20/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61G7/015, A47C20/041, A47C20/08
European ClassificationA61G7/015, A47C20/08, A47C20/04A