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Publication numberUS2350047 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 30, 1944
Filing dateSep 13, 1941
Priority dateSep 13, 1941
Publication numberUS 2350047 A, US 2350047A, US-A-2350047, US2350047 A, US2350047A
InventorsEmil Klarmann, Gates Louis W
Original AssigneeLehn & Fink Products Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Antiperspirant and deodorant
US 2350047 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented May 30, 1944 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE v v mnnsrmziz'iiltrl nnononanr I Emil Klarmann and poratlon, a corporation of Delaware Louis Vii-Gates, Bloomfield, era to Lelin & Fink Pr odncts Cor- Serial No. 410,759

9 Claims. (Cl. 167- 90) zinc, iron, and aluminum. 'Ihus use has been made of the chlorides and sulfates of zinc and iron, the acetate, lactate, acetotartrate or sulfocarbolate of aluminum, and particularly aluminum salts of strong acids, such as alumlnum chloride, aluminum sulphate and thelike. Such compounds are occasionally found to have local irritant action, and are also found to have a deleterious effect upon clothing with which they come in contact. These solutions .of compounds of astringent salts of suchmetals, and particularly the salts with strong acids, when brought in contact with fabrics such as the ordinary cotton and cellulose or cellulose derivative fabrics, cause a very marked decrease in the strength of such fabrics, particularly when they are pressed or ironed, and lead to rapid deterioration or rotting of the fabric. Such difficulties arise particularly in connection with the use of creams, some portions of which .tend to adhere to garments worn by the user. These garments, if

found to be adequate.

Thus, oxides, hydroxides or carbonates of zinc, magnesium or aluminum may be employed. Proportions of from about 1% to about 3% have been Lower proportions may be used if desired. Larger proportions are un necessary; and if too large a proportion is used, it may reduce the perspiration inhibiting effect of the metallic astringent salt employed.

Contrary to expectations, the water-insoluble basic compound added to the solution of astringent compound in the preferred proportions will dissolve therein. Apparently, hydrolysis of the astringent salt develops suiilcient acidity to bring about solution of the insoluble basic compound, probably with the formation of a complex. When in contact with fabrics and particularly at high temperatures such as are used in pressing or ironing, the small proportion of the insoluble basic compound added to the solution of the astringent compound appears to affect the latter in such a manner as to injuring the fabric.

The water-insoluble basic metal compound may be introduced as such into the solution or cream containing the astringent metal compound or may be formed therein by the addition of a suitable proportion of a soluble base, such as a hy pressed or ironed without careful removal of the 1 astringent metallic salt, are greatly reduced in strength or may be practically ruined.

These solutions or creams of aluminum chloride or sulfate of the strength employed for inhibiting or retarding perspiration, for example, solutions of 10 to 20%, cause a decrease in tensile strength of cotton or cellulose fabrics of 50% or more on pressing. Approximately similar deterioration of fabrics occurs with other metallic astringent salts suitable for retarding or checking perspiration. The deteriorating effect of such compounds upon the fabric becomes an important factor in their use. Such deterioration also occurs to a considerable extent with woolen and silk fabrics.

In accordance with the present invention, it

has been found that the, deteriorating effect of such perspiration retarding compounds upon fabrics may be greatly reduced or substantially eliminated without affecting the eificiency of the compounds in retarding or inhibiting perspiration, by incorporating or suspending in the compound a water-insoluble basic compound of a metal, preferably one not having any decided color.

droxide or carbonate. In the former case, the water-insoluble basic compound may be one of another metal than that of the astringent metallic salt. or may be of the same metal. In th latter case, it will ordinarily be a basic compound of the same metal as that of the astringent metallic salt; and when formed in this manner, the insoluble basic compound may not remain in solut on, but may be in the form of a precipitate which functions to inhibit fabric corrosion as described.

As an example of the results secured by the use of the present invention, an astringent solution or cream containing about 17% of aluminum sulfate will bring about, at pressing temperature, a corrosion of cotton fabric indicated by a reduction in tensile strength of over By incorporating in the solution or,cream about 1.7% of aluminum hydroxide by the addition of a suitable proportion of sodium hydroxide or other suitable soluble base, the resulting solution or cream will, under the same conditions, have'only a negligible corrosive action, as indicated by a reduction in tensile strength in the order of about 2%. The incorporation of precipitated aluminum hydroxide as such'in similar amounts gives approximately similar results. The addition to such a solution or cream containing about 17% of prevent it from materially Magnesium oxide aluminum sulfate of a small proportion, say about 2%, of the oxide or carbonate of zinc or magnesium likewise greatly reduces the undesired corrosive action on fabrics under pressing or ironing conditions, as indicated by a loss in tensile strength in the order of or less.

The results above given are illustrative of those secured with other metallic astringent salts as heretofore set forth, and with varying proportions of the astringent salt in the compound, lotion or cream. The proportions of the soluble astringent metal salt and of the water-insoluble basic salt may vary widely, as heretofore indicated. In general, effective results are secured, without reducing the anti-perspirant efiect of the soluble astringent salt, if the amount of the insoluble basic salt is from about 4% to about of the amount of the soluble astringent salt.

The following are illustrative embodiments of compounds prepared in accordance with the present invention. All parts indicated are by weight.

Example I Parts Aluminum chloride Precipitated aluminum hydroxide 2.5 Water 77.5

Example I I Example IV Parts Aluminum chloride 15 Tegac'id 15 Spermaceti wax 3 Beeswax 2 Water 62.5

The soluble aluminum salts in the above fornum salts, such as the acetate, mono-chloroaseaoar Watcrdree creams may also be prepared in accordance with the present invention by em ploying suitable vehicles, such as Vaseline, lanolin and the like. The methods of preparing the solutions or creams are those commonly employed in pharmaceutical practice.

Although the invention has been described in connection with the details of certain specific examples thereof, it is not intended that these shall be regarded as limitations upon the scope of the invention except in so far as included in the accompanying claims.

We claim:

1. A perspiration retarding or inhibiting composition obtained by combining a soluble astringent salt of a polyvalent metal with a proportion of a water-insoluble metallic base in an amount of from about 4% to about 15% on the soluble astringent salt.

2. A perspiration retarding or inhibiting composition obtained by combining about 10% to about 25% of a soluble astringent salt of a polyvalent metal Withfrom about 1% to about 3% of a water-insoluble metallic base.

3. A perspiration retarding or inhibiting composition obtained by combining about 10% to about 25% of a soluble astringent salt of aluminum with from about 1% to about 3% of a waterinsoluble metallic base.

4. A perspiration retarding or inhibiting composition obtained by combining about 10% to about 25% of a soluble astringent salt of zinc with from about 1% to about 3% of an insoluble metallic base.

5. A perspiration retarding or inhibiting composition obtained by combining about 10% to acetate, lactate, acetotartrate or sulfocarbolate,

or by corresponding soluble astringent salts of zinc, iron or other polyvalent metals, such as are commonly employed to check or inhibit excessive perspiration. The sodium hydroxide may be replaced by other soluble basic salts such as the carbonates or hydroxides of the alkali metals and ammonium.

about 25% of a soluble astringent salt of iron with from about 1% to about 3% of an insoluble metallic base.

6. A perspiration retarding or inhibiting composition obtained by combining in a water-containing vehicle, a soluble astringent salt of a polyvalent metal and a proportionof a waterinsoluble basic aluminum compound in an amount of from about 4% to about 15% on the soluble astringent salt.

7. A perspiration retarding or inhibiting composition obtained by combining in a water-containing vehicle, a soluble astringent salt of a polyvalent metal and a proportion of a. waterinsoluble basic zinc compound in an amount of from about 4% to about 15% on the soluble astringent salt.

8. A perspiration retarding or inhibiting composition obtained by combining in a water-containing vehicle, a soluble astringent salt of a polyvalent metal and a proportion of an insoluble basic magnesium compound in amount from about 4% to about 15% on the soluble astringent salt.

9. A perspiration retarding or inhibiting composition obtained by combining in a water-containing vehicle, a soluble astringent salt of aluminum and a proportion of a water-insoluble basic aluminum compound in an amount of from about 4% to about 15% oh the soluble astringent salt.

EMIL KLARMANN. LOUIS W. GATES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3923971 *Sep 13, 1973Dec 2, 1975Seilinger AlexandreAntiperspirant and deodorant composition containing lamellar substances
US3998788 *Jul 17, 1974Dec 21, 1976Armour Pharmaceutical CompanyAluminum-zirconium anti-perspirant systems with trace amounts of alkaline earth metals
US4659560 *Mar 14, 1985Apr 21, 1987Lever Brothers CompanyDeodorant compositions
US4708863 *Aug 3, 1981Nov 24, 1987Lever Brothers CompanyDeodorant compositions
US5100659 *Jun 14, 1990Mar 31, 1992Titan Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaMixture of titanium dioxide, magnesium or calcium oxide powders
US5108739 *Jun 21, 1990Apr 28, 1992Titan Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaWhite colored deodorizer and process for producing the same
US5110586 *Jun 21, 1990May 5, 1992Titan Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaWhite colored deodorizer and process for producing the same
US5330751 *Oct 3, 1990Jul 19, 1994The Gilette CompanyAntiperspirant and method of making same
US5512274 *Nov 25, 1992Apr 30, 1996Phinney; Robin L.Metal hydroxide deodorant formulation
US5558858 *Sep 17, 1990Sep 24, 1996Reheis, Inc.Co-dried aluminum oxyhydroxides
US5955065 *Aug 19, 1998Sep 21, 1999The Gillette CompanyA topical antiperspirant comprising a dermatologically acceptable anhydrous carrier vehicle in a suspension of a perspiration-reducing active amount of an aluminum or an aluminum-zirconium antiperspirant salt and a water soluble calcium salt, e.g., calcium chloride, calcium lactate
US6042816 *Aug 19, 1998Mar 28, 2000The Gillette CompanyReacting aluminum with an aqueous solution of aluminum halide or aluminum nitrate or with aqueous hydrogen halide or nitric acid to form aluminum hydroxy halide or aluminum hydroxy nitrate
US6245325Nov 5, 1999Jun 12, 2001The Gillette CompanyEnhanced antiperspirant salts stabilized with calcium and concentrated aqueous solutions of such salts
Classifications
U.S. Classification424/65, 424/67, 424/68
International ClassificationA61K8/27, A61Q15/00, A61K8/19, A61K8/26
Cooperative ClassificationA61K8/27, A61K8/26, A61Q15/00
European ClassificationA61K8/26, A61Q15/00, A61K8/27