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Publication numberUS2350059 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 30, 1944
Filing dateApr 15, 1942
Priority dateApr 15, 1942
Publication numberUS 2350059 A, US 2350059A, US-A-2350059, US2350059 A, US2350059A
InventorsMesschaert Frederick W
Original AssigneeMesschaert Frederick W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Indicator for typewriters and the like
US 2350059 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

M y 1944- F. w. MESSCHAERT 7 2,350,059

INDICATOR FOR TYPEWRITERS AND THE LIKE Filed April 15, 1942 FiE-l- INVEN fksoselclr W Msssc 5E7 Patented May 30, 1944 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE INDICATOR FOR zi si w Rlfl'ERs AN THE I 4 Claims.

My invention relates to an indicator for typewriters and machines of like character and particularly to that class of machines wherein the operator employs a so-called touch system or method of operation.

The typist is now trained to operate atypewriter without the necessity of referring to the lettered keyboard, and his movements become more and more mechanical and habitual as experience increases. However, during the ordinary processes of typing it is many times necessary for the operator tollit his hands from the keyboards home position, as such it is called, in order to manipulate the shift lever, spacer, platen control, or other instruments associated with the general use of a typewriter, but not methodically correlated to the basic movements developing [mm the so-called home position used in a touch system of operation. It has been found that when the hands of the operator are so lifted from the keyboard to perform the task of working the above mentioned instruments, or because of any other interruptions necessitating removal of the operator's hands from the keyboard, that when the typing is resumed sometimes even the best operator does not return his. fingers to the home position,--that is, the fingers are placed inadvertently on the third bank of keys rather than the second bank, or one hand might easily be one or two keys out of position relative to the starting or home position keys.

Therefore. an object of my invention is to provide a touch-responsive indicator adapted to be fixed to a predetermined key or plurality of keys in a typewriter keyboard whereby the operator will know, without glancing at the keyboard, that his fingers are in the correct home position before starting to operate the machine and needlessly wasting time and material ber ore discovering a mistake in finger position. By a touch-responsive indicator, 1 mean that type of indicator which when touched by the operator will indicate to the operators senses the position of the predetermined key to which it is fixed.

A further object or my invention is to provide a touch-responsive indicator adapted to be used on all existing standard model typewriter keys.

Another object is to provide a detachable touch-responsive indicator which can be easily installed on desired keys and removed therefrom by the operator. A still further object is to provide a position indicator for typewriters and the like which will not materially change the appearance of a typewriter. v

Further objects and advantages will become apparent on reference to the following specification and accompanying drawing which iorms a part of this specification, and as particularly pointed out on the claims at the end of the specification. In the drawing similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in the several views.

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a keyboard as used on a standard model typewriter, embodying one form of my invention,

Fig. 2 is a top perspective view of my invention as applied to a conventional typewriter key.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view of my invention shown in Fig. 2 taken on line 3-4 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a top perspective view of a modification of my invention shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken on line 5-4 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a top perspective view of a further modification of my invention shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. '7 is a sectional view taken on line 1-1 of Fig. 6.

As shown in Fig. 1, the invention as applied to a standard keyboard for typewriters. thehome or starting position of the operator's fingers are for the left hand the identified key letters A, S, D and F, and for the right hand they. key letters J, K, L and semicolon. My indicator, represented at 2, can be afiixed to any one of these keys or a plurality thereof. For purposes of illustration 1' have shown my indicator afilxed to the key letters F and J which are the home positions of the forefingers of the operator's left and right hand respectively. With the arrangement of my touch-responsive indicator as here shown, the

operator, upon placing his fingers on the key-- board, would know that his fingers are at the home position if the said indicators were touched by his foreflngers, or on the contrary, if the indicators were not so touched, it would convey the message to the operator that his fingers were not in the proper home position.

The indicator 2 is shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 6 as having a round surface projecting above the top face 3 of the typewriter key. The round, ball-like indicator member is cut away as at l in order to fit snugly over the rim 5 of the top face of the key. Fig. 4 shows an indicator 2 with a substantially fiat and rectangular indicating surface projecting above the top surface of the key face 3, and bent over the rim 5 of the said key face in order to insure a good fit. It is pointed out that the forms of the indicator shown herein are for purposes of illustration and varying shapes and degrees of projection relative to tion described the top face of the typewriter key are workable and entirely within the scope and spirit of my invention.

The same variance of means for affixing the indicator 2 to a key is comprehended. I have shown by way of illustration three means of attaching the said indicator to a conventional typewriter key.

Figs. 2 and 3 show a preferred method of attachment consisting of a clamp member indicated generally at 6, and adapted to support an arm I which in turn carries the indicator 2. The clamp is placed around the shaft 8 of the key. The clamp can beheld in position by the nut and bolt 9 or by any other suitable means. The clamp member 6 extends outwardly from the shaft 8 to a point substantially in line with the outside peripheral edge of the key face 3, at that point it projects upwardly and perpendicularly relative to the clamp and substantially parallel to the said shaft member in order to form the supporting arm I which carries the indicator 2.

The indicator may be fixed at any suitable position on the key face by modifying the position of the supporting arm relative to the key shaft, or by other appropriate means, but I have shown the indicator at the -rear of the key face for purposes of convenience in illustration and description.

The modification disclosed in Figs. 4 and 5 shows a clamp member l0 consisting 'of two tension arms H, adaptedto compressively engage the key shaft 8. The open ends of the tension arms are curved toward one another as at l2 to form a stop insuring against unwanted sliding action of the clamp member. The supporting arm I is of the same construcwith regard to that shown in Figs. 2 and 3. I 7

Figs. 6 and 7 disclose a further modification consisting of a clamp i3 attached directly to the key shaft I by means of a bolt H or, other suitable means. The supporting arm 1 carrying the indicator 2 are of the same construction as that hereinabove described.

Vertical displacement of the indicator is taken care of by means of the clamping devices attached to the key shafts. However,.it should be mentioned that the indicator is itself preferably positioned over the rim of the key face, hence compensating for any tendency of the device to move downwardly and away from the key face.

Most typewriter key shafts are enlarged at a its position adjacent the top surface of the key face.

What I claim is:

1. In a detachable typewriter indicator, a clamp comprising two tension arms adapted to compressively engage the shaft of a predetermined key, said clamp adapted to support a vertically disposed arm which carries an indicator, said indicator adapted to be positioned-adjacent to the top face of the said key and relatively projected therefrom. t

2. In a detachable typewriter indicator, a clamp comprising two tension arms adapted to compressively engage the shaft of a predetermined key, one end of said tension arms adapted to support a vertically disposed arm which carries an indicator, said indicator adapted to be positioned adjacent to the top face of the said key and relatively projected therefrom, the opposite free ends of said tension arms curved toward one another to form a stop.

3. In a typewriter, touch-responsive indicating means in combination with a typewriter keyboard comprislng a touch-responsive indicator support clamped detachably and compressively by means of tension arms to the shaft of a home position key, said indicator relatively projected from the top face of said home position key,

whereby the operator is apprised of finger position relative to other keys of said typewriter without glancing at said keyboard.

4. In a typewriter, touch-responsive indicating means in combination with a typewriter keyboard comprising a touch responsive indicator support clamped detachably and compressively by means oftension arms to the shaft of home position keys F" and J," said indicator rela-' tively projected from the top face of said home position keys "F" and J, whereby the operator is apprised of starting finger position in a touch system method of typewriter operation.

FREDERICK w. MESSCHAERT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4762436 *Jul 16, 1986Aug 9, 1988Herzog Barbara DBio-mechanical neuro-sensory keyboard structure and operating methods
US6752552Jun 21, 2000Jun 22, 2004Alberto B SabatoLocating key for a keyboard or keypad
US6991390Sep 6, 2002Jan 31, 2006Sabato Alberto BLocating key for a keyboard or keypad
EP0086032A2 *Jan 6, 1983Aug 17, 1983General Foods CorporationStabilizer for frozen foamed emulsions and method therefor
WO1985003035A1 *Jan 16, 1985Jul 18, 1985Roy Jeremy LahrSplittable keyboard for word processing, typing and other information input systems
Classifications
U.S. Classification400/715, 400/494
International ClassificationB41J5/00, B41J5/12
Cooperative ClassificationB41J5/12
European ClassificationB41J5/12