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Publication numberUS2352201 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 27, 1944
Filing dateMay 23, 1941
Priority dateMay 23, 1941
Publication numberUS 2352201 A, US 2352201A, US-A-2352201, US2352201 A, US2352201A
InventorsJacob Ezekiel J
Original AssigneeBenjamin Liebowitz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Composition of matter
US 2352201 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 27, 1944. E. J.-JACOB COMPOSITIONv oF MATTER Filed May .25. 1941' Juan.;

Patented June 27, 1944 UNITED STATES PATENT *orifice-1.fl

Ezekiel J. Jacob, New York, N. Y., assigner to Benjamin Liebowitz, New York, N. Y.

Application May 23, 1941, Serial No. 394,893

5 Claims. (-Cl. 13d-230) My present invention relates to a new composition of matter, and more particularly to a material of which bowl-shaped receptacles for smoking pipes may be'made.

An object of my present invention consists `in providing a new heat resistant composition of matter which, at the same time, is strong and porous.

A further object of my invention consists in providing a slowly setting cold binding cement or like material.

Another object of my invention consists of a new material for pipe bowls or the like which, after a few smokes, acquires a brownish, meerschaum-like color.

Still another object of my present invention consists in providing for pipe bowls or the like a new material which is heat insulating and thereby protects the surrounding material. This object is of particular significance at the time of this application when the importation of the hard briar woods usually employed in smokers pipes is substantially cut off and when more extensive use of domestic woods may be necessi tated. n

With the above objects in view, my present invention mainly consists of a new composition of matter, particularly for bowl-shaped receptacles for smoking pipes, comprising a heat resistant cementing substance mixed with line heat resistant filaments. A preferred embodiment of my invention consists of a composition of matter comprising mainly plaster of Paris, intimately mixed with fine glass laments.

The expression heat resistant as used throughout this specification, means having the ability to withstand at least a temperature which is equal to the temperature encountered in the bowl of a smoking pipe, due to the burning tobacco therein, without undergoing any substantial physical or chemical change.

Another word frequently used in this specification and claims, whose meaning should be clarified, is cementing substance. This expression, as used throughout this specification, embraces any bonding material capable of retaining heat resistant fine filaments, for instance glass filaments, within its structure. Such ceinenting substances are, for example, cold binding materials as cement, plaster of Paris, and hot binding material as low firing clay, or the like. Furthermore, it is possible to use as cementing substances materials which may be brought into the desired shape by compression, for instance, plastics incorporating briar dust, wood dust or the like. In all cases, however, it' is important that the cementing substance be heat resistant in the above defined sense.

As stated above, various cementing substances may be used; but for convenience of description, I will describe my invention in combination with plaster of Paris.

As fine heat resistant filaments I prefer to use glass lfilaments having a diameter ofthe order o fmagnitude of a few ten-thousandths of an inch. These filaments are used in discontinuous state. I have found that by intimately mixing the cementing substance, preferably plaster of Paris', with discontinuous ne glass filaments, these filaments hold the plaster particles during hardening apart from each-other, thereby increasing its porosity after hardening.

The filaments used by me, particularly the glass filaments, areresilient to a certain extent and thus they also increase theresiliency and strength of the hardened cementing substance. Therefore', the tendency of an article, e. g. a pipe or a pipe bowl made of such a substance, to break during use is substantially decreased.

Asv stated above, a preferred embodiment of my'invention consists of a composition of matter comprising plaster of Paris and discontinuous fine glass filaments. After hardening of the plaster of Paris, the glass filaments should be substantially evenly distributed through it and firmly embedded therein.

I have found that by adding silica gel to the plaster of Paris it is possible to prevent it from being calcined when exposed to damp heat: the silica gel particles embedded in the plaster of Paris, will adsorb the moisture and retain it, thereby avoiding calcination.

This tendency of silica gel makes its addition to materials from which pipe bowls of the like are made, particularly important and advantageous; the condensates formed during smoking are adsorbed by the silica gel contained in the pipe bowl, preventing thereby calcination of the material of which the pipe bowl is made. Furthermore, the tarry liquids and condensates adsorbed by the silica gel are forming a brownish deposit, which gives the inner surface of a pipe bowl made of plaster of Paris with addition of silica gel even after a relatively short period of smoking a meerschaum-like appearance.

I have furthermore found that by addition of a small percentage of Congo-red, the setting of the plaster of Paris can be retarded; thus, by

addition of a small percentage, e. g. less than 1 per cent of Congo-red, it is possible to attain .and a pipe bowl 1.

may comprise from 50-95`% of plaster of Paris,

from 50-5% of fine heat resistant filaments, preferably glass lamentsfrom O.1:to5% o'f ysilicaV gel, and from 0.1 to`2% of Congo-red.

My invention will be more clearly understood from the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective View of a cube made lofmy new composition of matter;

Fig. 2 is a bowl-shaped element adapted to lie within the bowl of a smoking pipe and to receive and to hold the tobacco; l

Fig. 3 is a pipe provided with a lining for the,

pipe bowl; and

Fig. 4 is a cross-section through the bowlshaped element shown in Fig. 3.

In the embodiment shown in-Fig. -1, my new composition of matter-consists of discontinuous glass laments I embedded in hardened plaster of Paris 2; the glass laments I Vare thoroughly mixed with the plaster of Paris, in either dry or wet state; I prefer to mixthe glass laments with a thick paste of semi-hardenedvplaster of Paris, as I have found that in this case cohesion of the dry glasslamentsby static electricity can easily be avoided. v

Figs. 2 andv 4 show a bowl-shaped element tting into a pipe bowl and vholding the tobacco while it is smoked. At the bottom of this bowlshaped element an opening 3 may be provided, if required. In the side wall of the bowl, an opening 4 is arranged; this opening 4 has to be in register with pipe stem 5, indicated in Fig. 2 by dotted lines.

Instead of making a bowl-shaped element which has to be inserted into the wooden vpipe bowl, I may also make the pipe bowl entirely of new material proposed by me, v

The pipe shown in Fig. 3 consists of a stem 6 The inner surface of `this bowl is covered by a lining 8 consisting of my new composition of matter. In order to obtain a uniform lining, I propose rst to pour the lining material while still in liquid state into the pipe bowl, let it set in the pipe bowl for some time, and pour the material which has not set, again out of the bowl. The material set on the inner surface of the Wooden bowl 1, then forms a lining 8 of uniform thickness.

The specific embodiments shown are merely illustrative. What I claim as my invention and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. Composition of matter, particularly for bowls of smoking pipes, comprising plaster of Paris intimately mixed with fine heat resistant laments and Congo-red.

v2. Composition of matter, particularly Afor bowl-shaped receptacles of smoking pipes adapted to hold the tobacco while it is smoked, said composition of matter comprising hardened plaster of Paris, discontinuous line glass iilaments, and a small percentage of Congo-red, said glass iilaments and said Congo-red substantially evenly distributed through said hardened plaster of Paris.

3. Composition of matter, particularly lfor bowls of smoking pipes, comprising plaster of Paris, intimately mixed with ne heat resistant laments, silica gel, and Congo-red.

4. Composition of matter, particularly .for bowl-shaped receptacles of smoking pipes adapted to hold the tobacco while it is smoked, said composition of matterA comprising hardened plaster of Paris, discontinuous fine glass filaments, silica gel, and a small percentage of Congo-red, said glass lfilaments,-silica gel, and Congo-red substantially evenly distributed through said hardened plaster of Paris.

5. Composition of matter, particularly for 'bowl-shaped receptacles of smoking pipes adapted to hold the tobacco while it is smoked, said vcomposition of matter comprising from fifty to ninety-ve per cent of plaster of Paris, from fty to ve per cent of fine glass laments, from 0.1 to five per cent of silica gel, and from 0.1 to 2 per cent of Congo-red.

EZEKIEI..4 J. JACOB.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2681863 *Jul 7, 1951Jun 22, 1954Certain Teed Prod CorpPlaster compositions and products
US2738285 *Dec 28, 1951Mar 13, 1956Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpReinforced cement products and method of making the same
US2853394 *Mar 30, 1953Sep 23, 1958United States Gypsum CoCementitious composition
US2878666 *Oct 14, 1953Mar 24, 1959Ohio Commw Eng CoLightweight ceramic tiles
US3980487 *Jun 27, 1975Sep 14, 1976Nissan Chemical Industries, Ltd.Anticorrosive gypsum composition
US4203456 *Aug 26, 1977May 20, 1980Miller Richard TSmoking pipe
US5244608 *Jun 15, 1990Sep 14, 1993Mix-Wood ApsMethod and a system for manufacturing shaped objects of wood dust
Classifications
U.S. Classification131/230, 106/712, 106/711
International ClassificationA24F5/06, A24F5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA24F5/06
European ClassificationA24F5/06