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Publication numberUS2353332 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 11, 1944
Filing dateOct 11, 1943
Priority dateOct 11, 1943
Publication numberUS 2353332 A, US 2353332A, US-A-2353332, US2353332 A, US2353332A
InventorsHall Newton L
Original AssigneeHall Newton L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Binding tape or bandage
US 2353332 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 11, 1944. N. L. HALL BINDING TAPE OR BANDAGE Filed Oct. 11, 1943 lNVENTOR BY Newton 111ml.

Patented July 11, 194,4

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,353,332 BINDINGTAPE on BANDAGE Newton L. Hall, Long Beach, Calif.

- Application October 11, 1943, Serial No. 505,887 8 Claims. (Cl. l 28156l This invention relates to wrapping tape, and

an object of the invention is to produce a tape capable of performing the function of bundle wrapping tape and also capable of being used as a bandage or dressing for a body wound. Binding tape forv wrapping bundles is usually formed of stout paper, or similar material, one face of which has a continuous coating of adhesive, such as mucilage, which upon being moistened will adhere to the exterior of the package to which the tape is applied. While that type of wrapping tape performs its function satisfactorily, it undoubtedly wastes a considerable quantity of the adhesive material as it is not necessary in most uses ofsuch tape to have it adhere throughout its entire length to the exterior of the package.

Tape, or bandage material used for dressing I wounds or injured parts of the body, has been employed heretofore in which the body of the tape is nonadhesive. That is to say, it does not have a continuous coating of adhesive material but at spaced points along the length of the tape or strip therapeuticpads have'been provided attached to the tape or strip and covered by a shielding strip that may cover the therapeutic pad and also the adhesive area adjacent to the same. In using such a strip it has been the practice to cut the strip into sections beyond each end of the pad, and the strip has usually been kept in a wrapped condition as a surgical roll of dressing material. One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a tape in which adhesive areas are employed, spaced apart along the length of the strip or tape which are covered by the material of the strip itself so that whenever it is desired to employ the adhesive feature of the tape at any particular point, this can be accomplished merely by placing the tape in sufficient tension to break out the folds that envelope the adhesive area, and which, when broken out, will expose such area for use.

Another object of my invention is to provide a tape suitable for use as a surg cal dressing and in which therapeutic pads may be employed in conjunction with the adhesive area. Tape for this purpose is usually handled from a tightly wrapped roll, and one of the objects of my invention is to provide such tape with a construction whereby the spaced adhesive patches may also be utilized to cause the adjacent wraps of the roll to adhere to each other, thereby enabling the roll to mainta n itself in roll form.

Further objects of the invention will appear hereinafter.

The invention consists in the novel parts and combinations of parts to be described-hereinafter, all of which contribute to produce an efficient binding tape or bandage.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a perspective, illustrating a bandage or surgicaltape embodying my invention. This view illustrates a dressing of this tape or strip applied to an arm, and also illustrates another dressing being applied to the wrist.

Fig. 2 is a perspective showing a roll of this tape, and illustrating aportion of the same pulled out from the roll, This view illustrates the inside face of the tape.

Fig. 3 is a cross section, about on the line 33 of Fig. 2, upon an enlarged scale, and-illustrating details of the tape at the location of one of the adhesive areas or patches that are spaced along the tape or strip.

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3, but illustrating slight variations in the manner in which the folds in the tape .or strip are-made to form a cover and envelope for the adhesive area or patch.

Fig. 5 is a plan view, showing the inside face of the tape, and illustrating an embodiment of the invention in which the folds of the tape form an envelope for the therapeutic pads; and having an adhesive area at each end of, the pad.

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Figs. 3 and 4, but il lustrati'ng the relation of the folds which could form the pack in which the pad and adhesive areas illustrated in Fig. 5 may be embodied.

Fig. 'l is a fragmentary side elevation, and may be considered as a developed view showing portions of two contiguous wraps of a roll straightened out.

In Fig. 2, I illustrate the simplest embodiment of my invention. In this view i indicates a continuous tape or strip of any suitable material. If the tape is to be used as a surgical bandage, it

would be composed of surgical gauze or similar material. This strip would be supplied for use in a roll 2 from which the strip would be taken ofl.

At a plurality of points spaced apart along the length of this strip, I provide patches or areas, such as areas 3, 4 and 5, as indicated in Fig. 2. At numerals 4 and 5 the adhesive patches are illustrated as being enveloped in the material of the strip I.

As illustrated in Fig. 3, the adhesive coating or adhesive patch is covered and enveloped by the tape material by forming the folds 6 where the material is doubled over or folded upon itself.

As illustrated in Fig. 3, in forming these folds 6 the material, by reason of this folding, forms an area. of the adhesive patch; andin forming this envelope, illustrated in Fig. 3, the folded edges I that are developed by forming the folds 6, are disposed substantially abutting so that the adjacent patch is completely covered. As illustrated envelope 1 that substantially covers the entire in Fig. 3 the, adhesive patch itself is folded at the great and if suflicient tension is applied to the tape on each side of the location of an adhesive area'or patch, the folds can be broken out, or pulled out, so that the entire area of the adhesive patch is exposed for application to an' injured part, such-as a person's wrist, as illustrated in Fig. 1. In this view the adhesive patch 3 is illustrated as having been applied to the wrist near a wound II, which can be covered by the bandage, and if the bandage were constructed as illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6 a therapeutic pad l2 could be applied directly over the wound I I.

In FigQG'I illustrate the manner in which folds I 3 and 14 are formed in the tape body 15 to envelop such a pad l2 and also to envelop two patches I6 and I! located at each end of this pad. Although I have shown two adhesive patches between which the pad I2 is located, of course, if desired; only one adhesive patch need be employed as the bandage itself could be relied upon to hold the pad in place over the wound. In applying the bandage to slighter wounds, that is where very careful dressing is unnecessary, a short strip could be cut from the strip l3 by severing the pad and adhesive patches l6 and I! from the body of the strip, by cutting the same along the lines [8 at the outer edge of the adhesive patches.

In Fig. 4 I illustrate a form for the folds that diifers slightly from that illustrated in Fig. 3 in that the folds l9 are formed entirely on one side or edge of the adhesive patch 20. In other words, the material of the strip is folded upon itself and all the way across the folded adhesive its adhering function. In using these bandages. of course the tape can be cut oil at any desired point. And, furthermore, the tape carrying adhesive patches that have notbeen broken out, can function like ordinary bandage or tape material. In applying the upper bandage 28, which lar adhesive patch 3| at the other end of the tape can be'applied so that a portion of its area will I adhere to the skin of the forearm, the remaining portion overlapping the adjacent wrap 32 of the bandage, thus producing a compact bandage which is fastened to itself at one or several points, and which is also capable of being anchored to the wounded member, at one or more points.

'In reading the drawing, it should be understood that the thickness of the folds is greatly exaggerated in Figs. 3 to '7, inclusive. In practice, however, as the gauze material and the patches of adhesive and the 'pads will be quite thin, they will not interfere in any way with using the tape as an ordinary bandage in forming the wraps around an injured part, but at any point in the wraps where an adhesive patch is desired, it can be immediately obtained by pulling the strip on 7 each side of the location of the adhesive patch,

which will automatically expose the surface of the patch, the action being accomplished with a minimum of attention, from the operator.

The adhesive areas, of course, may be merely adhesiv coatings or they mayalso be employed in the form of thin rectangular pieces of fabric patch so that the folded edge 2| is located near one edge of the adhesive area. This type of fold forms an envelope quite similar to the envelope illustrated in Fig. 3, and by exerting tension on the strip the folds can be readily broken out to expose the adhesive pad 20.

In Fig. 7 I illustrate another embodiment of the invention, in which an adhesive area or adhesive patch 22 is applied to the tape body 23 and the ends only of this patch with the attached tape are folded over to form folds 24. These folds would cover only a portion of the area of the patch, leaving a portion 25 thereof which would be exposed. When this tape is wrapped into roll form the exposed portions of the adhesive patche will adhere to the next adjacent wrap, such as indicated by the wrap 26; and this will maintain the tape in its roll form. In the present instance, as illustrated in Fig. 7, folds 21, similar to the folds 24, are formed at the other end of the adhesive patch 22. With this embodiment of the invention it is evident that after drawing the tape oil the roll, the folds can be broken out by applying suflicient tension to the tape, and when the cover strip 26 is peeled ofi the tape or bandage will present a relatively long adhesive area or patch'which will perform coated. on the face with an adhesivematerial.

My invention has the advantage that while the bandage is being applied, the operator can at any instant, decide to set the bandage to adhere,

without the necessity of stopping the bandaging operation to use both hands to remove an 'extraneous protective crinoline or gauze covering from an adhesive patch.

Many other embodiments of this invention may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of'the invention.

What I claim is:

1. A binding tape including a continuous strip of nonadhesive material having a plurality of adhesive areas on one face thereof spaced apart along the length thereof, the material of the strip being folded back upon itself to form flat folds covering and adhering to the adhesive areas,

said folds capable of being separated from the adhesive areas by exerting tension upon the same to open the adhesive areas, thereby exposing the said areas to perform their adhering function in applying the tape.

2. A binding tape according to claim 1 adapted for use as a bandage; provided with a plurality of therapeutic pads carried by the strip on the said face.

3. A binding tape according to claim 1 adapted for use as a bandage, in which the said adhesive areas are disposed in pairs, the adhesive areas of said pairs being spaced apart and having therapeutic pads secured to the strip between the same.

4. A bandage including a continuous strip of nonadhesive fabric having a therapeutic pad secured on the face thereof, the material of the strip being folded back upon itself to form flat fold covering and enveloping the said pads, and

having an adhesive area on the same face of the strip adjacent said folds, the material of said strip being folded upon itself to cover and envelop said adhesive area, said bandage operating when tension is applied thereto, to break out said fold so as to expose the said adhesive area adjacent the pad, and in a position to perform its adhering function in bandaging an injured part.

5. A bandage including a continuous strip of nonadhesive fabric having a therapeutic pad secured on the face thereof, the material of the strip being folded back upon itself to form flat folds covering and enveloping the said pads, and having an adhesive area on the same face of the strip adjacent one end of said fold, and having an adhesive area on the same face of the strip adjacent the other end of said fold, the material of said strip being folded upon itself to cover and envelop said adhesive areas, said bandage operating, when tension is applied thereto, to break out said folds so as to expose the said adhesive areas at each end of the pad and in a position to perform their adhering function in bandaging an injured part. i

6. A bandage roll formed of a continuous strip of nonadhesive fabric having an adhesive area on one face thereof, the material of said strip wrap of the roll, thereby assisting to maintain the bandage in its roll form.

7. A bandage roll formed of a continuous strip of nonadhesive material having an adhesive area on one face thereof, the material of said strip being folded upon itself to cover one end portion of said adhesive area so as to adhere to, and envelop, the same, the material of said strip also being folded upon itself to cover the other end portion of said adhesive area so as to adhere to, and envelop, the same; the remaining uncovered portion of the adhesive area operating to adhere to an adjacent wrap of the roll and thereby assist in maintaining the bandage in its roll form.

8. A binding tape including a continuous strip of nonadhesive material having a plurality of adhesive patches spaced apart on one face thereof, the material of said strip being folded upon itself to cover said patches, and form an envelope therefor; said strip operating when tension is applied thereto to break out said folds so as to expose said adhesive patches.

NEWTON L. HALL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2476924 *Nov 8, 1947Jul 19, 1949Carl B StenvallAdhesive bandage and method and apparatus for making the same
US2555564 *Jun 23, 1949Jun 5, 1951Berman Oscar AExpandible adhesive material
US2560712 *Mar 11, 1949Jul 17, 1951Lewis B BellBandage for varicose ulcer treatment
US2562423 *Jan 28, 1949Jul 31, 1951Montreal Lithographing CompanyBottle capsule
US2633128 *Aug 26, 1949Mar 31, 1953Johnson & JohnsonPad construction and process
US2649199 *Aug 14, 1950Aug 18, 1953Jacques WermanHygienic packing for dressings and the like
US2969062 *Aug 10, 1955Jan 24, 1961Landau Miles EAdhesive protective pads
US3120229 *Nov 9, 1962Feb 4, 1964Gen Bandages IncBandage
US3464424 *Oct 23, 1965Sep 2, 1969Buzzelli Frank DMethod for retaining hair
US4040424 *May 14, 1976Aug 9, 1977Will Ross, Inc.Surgical pad
US4549653 *Sep 6, 1983Oct 29, 1985Johnson & Johnson Products, Inc.Adhesive bandage and package
US5780098 *Dec 20, 1996Jul 14, 1998Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyCoating of moisture-resistant, water-dispersible, pressure sensitive adhesive; surgical gowns; colorimetric analysis
US5843011 *Aug 11, 1997Dec 1, 1998Lucas; GregorySelf adhesive bandage roll
US6362388Nov 30, 1999Mar 26, 2002Gregory J. LucasAdhesive bandage
US20120222684 *Feb 25, 2012Sep 6, 2012Beck Lori RIntravenous therapy site tape and methods of using same
CN102058456BJan 25, 2011Mar 20, 2013苏州美迪斯医疗运动用品有限公司Functional self-adhered bandage
DE1008846B *Jul 20, 1954May 23, 1957Vorwerk & SohnSelbstklebender Streifen aus Gewebe, Papier oder Kunststoffolie
DE1052611B *Apr 21, 1955Mar 12, 1959Heinrich HermannVerfahren zum Herstellen von selbstklebenden, folienartigen Befestigungsmitteln
DE2504294A1 *Feb 1, 1975Aug 7, 1975Colgate Palmolive CoWindelverschluss
EP0371808A2 *Nov 30, 1989Jun 6, 1990Sherwood Medical CompanyWound dressing
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/42, 427/208.6, 206/440, 427/177, 206/441
International ClassificationA61F13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/0273, A61F13/0203
European ClassificationA61F13/02H, A61F13/02B