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Publication numberUS2353762 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 18, 1944
Filing dateFeb 28, 1941
Priority dateFeb 28, 1941
Publication numberUS 2353762 A, US 2353762A, US-A-2353762, US2353762 A, US2353762A
InventorsBigger Richard P, Robinson John E
Original AssigneeAmerican Can Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container
US 2353762 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 18, 1944.

J. E. ROBINSON ET AL CONTAINER Filed Feb. 28, 1941 li)? 37 i '76 5. M ATTORNEYS LINER ADHESIVE 1 FLY ADHESIVE Patented July 18, 1944 CONTAINER John E. Robinson, men Ellyn, and Richard r. Bigger, Lombard, 111., assignors to American Can Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation 7 of New Jersey Application February 28, 1941, Serial No. 321,132

8 Claims.

The present invention relates to fibre containers or cans whichare especially adapted for holding lard, hydrogenated shortenings, vegetable and mineral. oils and similar materials and has particular reference to a composite multiple ply fibre container body which has an inner liner of fibrous material treated to make it oil and grease resisting or oil and grease proof and is glued to the inner wall of the body with a special oil resisting glue.

For a number of years attempts have been made to provide a satisfactory and economical fibre container for the holding of lard, vegetable and mineraloils and many and various structures of can'bodies have been proposed for this purpose. The oil resisting properties of a liner for the inside of such a fibrous body must be of such a nature as to prevent seepage of any of the oily product into the fibrous walls of the can body layers. Over a period of time this type of product becomes very penetrating and unless the interior lining and the wall structure prevent any seepage of the satisfactory.

The present invention relates to a special kind a part of a container for holding the oily product under consideration, metallic ends have been.

- fibrous container body in which the respective layers are held together by a water base adhesive. An inner liner of fibre is also preferably used and such a liner is secured to the inner wall of the body preferably .by an improved high grade glue specially treated so that it will readily bond the two surfaces together. Such an inner liner is also treated to give it maximum oil resisting properties.-

An object of the present invention is the. pro- Vision of an oil and grease-proof can formed with a laminated or spirally wound body of fibrous materlal such as chipboard and one having its mul tiple walls secured together by a water base adhesive together with an impregnated oil resisting fibrous liner, which is glued down with a special oil resisting adhesive.

Another object of the invention is the provision ofa can of the character described having metal ends applied in a manner to insure an oil leakproof joint between the fibrous body and the end.

oily product, such cans are not of fibre can body and when such a body becomes Numerous other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent as it is better understood from the following description,- which. taken in connection with the accompanying drawing discloses a preferred embodiment thereof.

Referring to the drawing:

Figure 1 is a. longitudinal sectional view of an oil-proof container embodying the presentinvenv. tion andillustrating a multiple wall fibrous body with metal ends secured in. closed position and completely enclosing an oily product such as laid, vegetable or mineral oil; and

Fig. 2 is an enlarged sectional detail illustrating a cross section of the fibrous body and showing an inner liner and an outer label. 1

In the drawing, the fibre body is designated gen= erally by the numeral H and this body 'islpro vided with a suitablemetallic bottom or end member I: secured to the lower end ofthe body. in a crimped joint l3. After the contents A have been filled into the can it is closed by a metallic. top or end member M which may be crimpe'd as at IE to provide a leak-proof joint betweenthe body wall and the top.

The fibre body it is composed of a plurality. of layers or plies 2| (Fig. 2) the drawing ilius trating two such layers. Sucha body may be woundon a mandrel to providethe usual spiral construction or may be convolutely wound} In either event the multiple layer' construction results, the layers being held together by a cmen t or adhesive 22.

The can body is preferably also provided with,

an inner liner of fibrous material 23 which has been specially treated and which is held in place.

against the inner wall of the inside layerai of the fibre body by a layer of special adhesive 26; It is also desirable to designate the contents of the can and for this purpose a label 25 may be secured around the outer wall ofthe fibrous body by an adhesive film 26.

The special adhesive layer 24, used to glue the liner to the first ply, is preferably formed oi a high grade glue which may be an animal glue, or. other suitable glue which has been dispersed in water containing one per cent of a wetting agent. Such a wetting agent is preferably a sodium salt. of a sulphonated dioctyl ester of a dibasic acid such, for example, as sodium salt of monosulphonated dioctyl ester of succinic acid. Other wetting agentsmay be used as. for example, a.' sodium salt of an alkyl phosphoric acid.

In forming this mixture,- the; wetting agent may first be dispersed in waten A suitable liquid hydrocarbon may then be added to the glue dispersion in water and an emulsion glue and the the formation of the 2 of the hydrocarbon in the glueand water may thereby be formed. An aromatic liquid hydrocarbon has been found satisfactory such as toluene (CeHsCl-h) or benzene (CaHc). A chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon may also be used, suchas chloroform, carbon tetrachloride or beta trichloroethane or the di-trior tetra-chloride of ethylene. The hydro-carbon, or halogenated hydrocarbon is incorporated with the glue to provide a softening agent for the wax-impregnated inner liner 23, so that a more satisfactory bond will result between the liner, and the next ply of the fibre body.

In making up this adhesive according to one satisfactory formula, the hydrocarbon used is taken as substantially equal to about thirty percent of the weight of the dry solids. This adhesive may be applied directly to the body stock on the body winder in the usual manner.

The inner liner is preferably formed of a high grade sulphite paper which is impregnated under heat and pressure with approximately twenty oil-proof wax made by hydrogenating castor oil, cottonseed oil, soya bean oil, peanut oil, fish oil or similar materials. The adhesive film 22 used to hold the body layers together need not be the same as percent of an derived from glue may be used. These glues may be applied in any suitable manner as directly on the winding machine when the can bodies are formed. This inner liner is lapped suiflciently to make a satisfactory joint, the lap being held together by the adhesive used for uniting the liner-with the body wall.

The varnished label 25 is preferably applied in the usual manner on the formed can body. The film of adhesive 28 used for securing the label to the body may be the same adhesive as is usedin the formation of the can body or any other water base glue. Such a label will be applied with a slight overlap and this completes can body.

The formed can body then receives its bottom end l2. In order to prevent fraying of the end of the can body when it is secured to the flange of the bottom member the lower edge of the body is preferably flared outwardly slightly as at 3| (Fig. 1).

To provide the joint l3 such an end member l2 may be formed with an inner flange wall part 32, which is slightly inclined downwardly and outwardly" as shown, and an outer flange wall part 33. This outer wall part may be crimped inwardly to tightly engage the flared part 3| of the fibre body to provide the joint l3.

If desired, a sealing fllm 34 may be applied to the outwardly flanged end 3| of the can body prior to applying the can end member l2. Such a sealing mixture may be formed of a suitable wax or other oil resisting material and is disthat in layer 24, in fact any simple water baseglue such as those dextrine, starches, casein, or animal the flanged walls 35, 36 may part 36 between which a sealing channel 31 is provided. The flange wall part 36 is preferably extended so that it will engage the body wall in a frictional area and preferably terminates in a curled edge 38.

Prior to applying such a top end, the body wall may be flared outwardly slightly as at 39. This makes it so that the top may be more easily applied both for its initial sealing position and later as a reclosure. In applying this top member the flared section 39 of the can body I I enters into the sealing channel 31 of the flanged top and be squeezed together if desired, to provide a suitable sealed joint between the can body and the top. In some cases a sealing material may be desirable for this upper joint the same as for the bottom joint l3 in which case a wax the inner top edge of the can body as a sealing film 4|.

It is thought that the invention and many of its attendant advantages will be understood from the foregoing description, and it will be apparent that various changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the parts without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention or sacrificing all of its material advantages, the form hereinbefore described being merely a preferred embodiment thereof.

We claim:

1. An oil-proof fibre container for lard, vegetable and mineral oil and the like, comprising a container body having a plurality of fibre layers held together with an adhesive, and an inner liner of sulphite paper impregnated with hydrogenated castor oil, said liner being secured to the inside body wall by a glue which has been dispersed in water with a sodium salt of a sulphonated dioctyl ester of a dibasic acid and with a liquid hydrocarbon.

2. An oil-proof container for lard, vegetable and animal oils, and the like, comprising a container body having a plurality of fibre layers held together with an animal glue, an inner liner of sulphite paper impregnated with hydrogenated castor oil, said liner being secured to the inner body wall with an adhesive comprising glue which has been dispersed in water with a sodium salt of a sulphonated dioctyl ester of a dibasic acid and a liquid aromatic hydrocarbon, and metallic end members secured to the ends of 1 said body in sealing engagement with said inner posed on the inner bottom edge of the can body so that it contacts directly with the flange wall part 32 of the end. When this sealing mixture has been tightly squeezed into the joint I3, the

' container is ready to receive its contents.

The upper end member l-l may be suitably formed to engage the upper edge of the can body H. Since it is desirable to remove the top repeatedly after openingthe can the construction of the top end preferably differs somewhat from that of the bottom end member. As illustrated in Fig. 1, such a to may be formed with an inner flange wallpart 35 and an outer flange wall liner. 5

3. An oil-proof fibre container for lard, vegetable and mineral oils and the like, comprising a container body having a plurality of fibre layers held together with an adhesive consisting of a glue which has been dispersed in water containing about one percent (1%) of a wetting agent and into which a hydrocarbon solvent in amount approximating thirty percent (30%) of the weight of the dry solids in said'adhesive is incorporated, and an inner oil-proof liner of sulphite paper impregnated with oil-proof wax secured to the inner wall of the body by said glue.

4. An oil-proof fibre container for lard, vegetable and mineral oils and the like, comprising a container body having a plurality of flbre layers held together with an adhesive derived from animal glue, and an inner liner of sulphite paper impregnated under heat and pressure with an oil-proof wax of hydrogenated oil, said liner being secured to the inside layer of said body by an adhesive consisting of a glue which has been dispersed in water with a sodium salt of a culsealing substance may be applied to.

an animalers held together with phonated dioctyl ester of a dibasic acid and a hydrocarbon solvent to the extent of about thirty percent (30%) of the weight of the dry solids,

5. An oil-proof fibre container for lard, vegetable and animal oils and,the like, comprising a container body having a plurality of fibre layan inner liner of a sulphite paper impregnated with an oil-proof wax of hydrogenated cotton seed oil, said liner being glued down with an adhesive consisting of an animal glue which has been dispersed in water with a sodium salt of a monosulphonated dioctyl ester of succinic acid and with a liquid chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon.

6. An oil-proof fibre container for lard, vegetable and mineral oils and the like, comprising a container body having a plurality of fibre layers held together with an adhesive consisting of an aqueous dispersion of an animal glue and starch, and an inner liner of sulphite paper 1mpregnated with an oil-proof wax of hydrogenated 'fish oil, said liner being secured to the body wall by means of an adhesive consisting of an aqueous dispersion of a glue to which is added a sodium salt of an alkyl phosphoric acid and a liquid aromatic hydrocarbon.

a water base adhesive, and- 7. An oil-proof fibre container for lard, vegetable and mineral oils and the like, comprising a container body having a plurality of fibre layers held together by a water base adhesive, an inner liner of fibrous material impregnated under heat and pressure with an oil-proof wax derived from a hydrogenated vegetable oil and an oil resisting adhesive between the innermost layer of said container body and said inner liner for securing them together, said oil resisting adhesive comprising an animal glue dispersed in water, a wetting agent and a hydrocarbon solvent.

8. An oil-proof fibre container for l-ard, vegetable and mineral oils and the like, comprising a container body having a plurality of fibre layers held together by a water base adhesive, an inner liner of fibrous material impregnated under heat and pressure with an oil-proof wax derived from a hydrogenated animal. oil and an oil resisting adhesive between the innermost layer oi said container body and said inner linerfor securing them'together, said oil resisting adhesive comprising an animal glue dispersed in water, a wetting agent and a hydrocarbon solvent.

JOHN E. ROBINSON. RICHARD P. BIGGER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2665833 *Apr 15, 1949Jan 12, 1954Sutherland Paper CoGrease and moistureproof carton and container
US2858057 *Apr 19, 1954Oct 28, 1958Mullinix Charles DPackages
US3271228 *Oct 14, 1963Sep 6, 1966Worcester Gurdon SRemoistenable adhesive sheet
US3346435 *Nov 13, 1962Oct 10, 1967Kalle AgApparatus for forming containers from synthetic plastic films
US4927076 *Jan 24, 1989May 22, 1990Hemox, Inc.Medical appliance disposal container
US5039004 *Dec 12, 1989Aug 13, 1991Hemox CorporationMedical appliance disposal container
EP0428633A1 *Jan 24, 1990May 29, 1991Hemox, Inc.Medical appliance disposal container
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/93, 229/5.85, 428/478.8, 162/124, 229/4.5, 162/127
International ClassificationB65D3/22, B65D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D15/06, B65D3/22
European ClassificationB65D15/06, B65D3/22