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Publication numberUS2355785 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 15, 1944
Filing dateOct 21, 1942
Priority dateOct 21, 1942
Publication numberUS 2355785 A, US 2355785A, US-A-2355785, US2355785 A, US2355785A
InventorsJohn Dorfman
Original AssigneeMalco Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game or similar device
US 2355785 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

--Aug. 15, 1944. I J. DORFMAN 2,355,785

, G AME on SIMILAR DEVICE Filed Oct. 21, 1942 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 J J if 3 0. 0 JOHN D06 CRAKERS 4 T01 61a 1 J J 5 i. v 4- l0 l0 8 8 o o 0 0 mcnnnn R05 a s 3 "3 v 4- BILL'S 10TH 121'o1-"I7 4 4 2 2 Q Q J.

BUTTER 13 1 15101 4 4 2 2 v Q ,4 ll 3 /4 IN V EN TOR. JOHN DORFMAN ATTORNEY.

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 5' INVENTOR.- JOHN DURFMHIV ATTORNEY J. DORFMAN GA ME OR SIMILAR DEVICE Filed Oct. 21, 1942 Aug. 15, 1944.

Patented Aug. 15, 1944 UNITED STATES. PATEN'l l OFFlCE.

John Dorflnanjfiew YorkQ NIQYL, assignor to Malco, 1110., NewY ork, N.' Y., a corporation of NewYork f Application October 21, 1942, Serial No. 462,780 2 Claims. (01. 273-5135) This invention relates generally to games and more particularly to such which employ the use.

of playing cards. More specifically it relates to the combination of playing cards with a game board.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a game in which a game board having a plurality of fixed playing card representations is used with a deck of conventional playing cards, which deck of cards are played on the game board and made to cooperate therewith to form a game similar to the game known as poker.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a game simulating poker andin which fixed playing members arearranged in predetermined fashion on a game board and ainumber of individual playing cards' are dealt out from the stack of cards and cooperate with the fixed members on the board to produce the game.

It is a still further] object of thepresent invention to provide a game of the above character, wherein advertisements are tied up with the game in such manner as to effectively compel the player to repeat the names of certain brands of products, during the performance of the game.

Yet another object of the present invention is to arrange the fixed playing members'on the game board according to established betting odds,

preferablyin inverse order, that is, a playing residesin providing each fixed playing member with all four suit symbols of conventional play ing cards. v, I

Further objects and advantages of thcinvention .will appear from the following disclosure thereof together with the attached drawings which illustrate, a certain formof embodiment thereof. This form is shown for. the; purpose of illustrating the invention to give satisfactory. and reliable results, although iti's' to be understood that the instrumentalities of which the invention consists can be variously arranged ando'r ganized and that the inventionis not limitedto the precise arrangement and organization of the instrumentalities as herein shown and described.

In the drawings: M Fig. 1 is a plan view of a game boardmad'e in accordance with the invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged lower left-hand corner of the game board in typical use. h

The game board I0 is providedwith a plurality of rows of preferably printed fields or boxes ll and preferably larger adjoining sections or boxes l2. Fields II are imprinted with or otherwise carry' indicia, emblems or symbols I3, I 4, l5 and I6 indicative of suits of playing cards, such as, for example, hearts, clubs, spades and diamonds, respectively and the rows of fields are arranged in spaced parallel relation. The total number of the-fields II is thirteen toi'nclude all of the fifty-two cards of a a conventional deck-of playing cards from ace to king, inclusive.

addition to the'aforesaidindicia or symbols; the boxes I I carry respectively indicia, such as, A (ace) ;K (king); Q (queen) ;'J (jack); etc.,

and may carry betting odds characters or numbers,'-preferably consecutively from 3 to l to 15to 1, inclusive. I

1 These fields or boxes ll. may also carry the brand or trade-mark I8 of the advertiser, the advertisers name [9 orthe name 20 of the adv'ertised merchandise.

3 Ihe larger spaces 12 may be utilized for carrying illustrations 2| of the merchandise.

-- In the particular embodiment illustrated in Figure 1, the fixed playing members are arranged ina predetermined order, starting with the'ace followed by the king, queen, etc., and terminating with th deuce. This is one typical arrangement deck of fifty-two conventional playing cards is {In the instance illustrated in Figure'2', twelve cards of theconventional playing deck are exposedenamely, adjacent the 10 spot playing memn: as printed on the game board are positioned 'l'our cards, namely, two 10s represented by the letter 6 and two 5s represented by the letter 0. A djacent'the 7 spot playing member d printed on the 'gameboard are positioned 'four cards, namely, three cardsbearing queens and represented by lthefletter e. and an ace'r'epresented by the letter f. Adjacent the 1 spotplaying'member g printed on" th'e'game board arefpositioned four cards, namely, a 3 spot card bga deuce i and two aces 'lcgfAccordinglto the rules of poker, the highest hand on" the game boardis the one having three tens and-two fives (full house), the next to the highesthand is the one having three queens and the lowest handis the one having two aces.

Referring to Figure 1, it will be s'eenthat acand if the said playing member and the said.

four cards indicate a straight, then flush would be presented. a

As is evident from what has been heretofore stated, the game follows the rules of poker. The

a straight players select their respective playing members on the game board with which they desire to start. This selection would in a measure .depend both upon the odds depicted on the playing member and the value indicated thereon; in the embodiment illustrated in the drawings, the lesser the value, the greater the odds.

The deck'of fifty-two cards are shufiled, and

the dealer successively places a cardlface-up) adjacent each of the playing members, in the order in which they appear on the top of the stack of cards as he deals them out. In the example illustrated in Figure 2,.these cards are in the-following order tenof spades, queen of-diamonds, three of diamonds, ten of diamonds, queen of hearts, deuce of spades, five of diamonds, queen of hearts, ace of spades, five of diamonds,

ace of hearts, and ace of diamonds.

In this game it is possible to get five of a kindwhich beats four ofa kind, but does not beat a straight flush or a royal fiush. A vfull house, straight or flush counts in thisgame the same as regular poker. These hands beat the same hands as in regular poker. As stated heretofore, the printed card on the game board counts as part of both straights and flushes. However, in the case of flus hes,.the printed member or card on the game board preferably counts only as a part of a fiush if the hand does not contain another card of the same denomination as the printed member or card on the game board. In other words, if the ace of spades out of the deck of cards is dealt to the ace on the game board, it makes a pair of aces and does not count as part of a spade flush.

This game is not only extremely interesting, but finds excellent use'as an advertising medium. 'For example, the fixed playing members on the board may be called or designated by certain well-known brands or trade-marks. Referring to Figure 1, one player may select .as his in, the deck being ..used and also represents .a

.or five races, asagreed. upon before the game everything placed on losing horses.

starts, then passes the bank on to the next player. In this manner each player, in his turn, has the option to act as banker. While the banker is shufiling the cards before each race, the players back their choice by placing chips, or tokens, on the printed card, or cards ll of their choice. When all players have selected their choice, the banker starts the race by dealing out the cards one at a time and places them, in the same rotation as they come off the deck, in the space provided alongside of each printed card on the game board. (Example)players place their chips *or tokens in the boxes with the printed card corners. The first card dealt OK the deck by the banker is placed alongside of the ace printed on'the game board, the second card dealt is placed alongside of the king, the third alongsid'of. the queen, and so forth down to the deuce (2) When thirteen cards have been dealt out in this mannerand each card printed on the game board has a card 01f the deck alongside of it the same operation is repeated until the banker has dealt out the entire deck of 52 cards. When each printed card on the game board has four cards out of the deck alongside of itthe race is over. The winner of the race is the Highest poker hand. The banker pays the player or players. who selected the winner, the odds indicated on the printed card and, of course, keeps When the first race is over another is started and, so on, the game continues. This race may be considered a one-mile race. When all the cards printed on the gameboard have been dealt a first card out of the deck, it compares with the finish of the quarter mile in a horse race, the second card compares With the finish of the half mile, the third card with the finish. of the three-quarters-the fourth and last card with the stretch and winner. The banker, or. one of the players, can add much hilarity to the party bycalling out the running of the race'asthe, cards. are being dealt.

The following rules may be observed. Players may back as many horses as they choose in every race. Any number of players may choose and back the same horse, or horses. However, the banker may limit the amount any one player, or all players combined, may place on any horse. All choices must be made beforea race starts no play may be made while a race is in progress.

.Odds against horses are to win only-there are no place (second) or show (third) odds. The printed card on the game board counts as part .of every poker hand.

All horses do not have to be played in order to start a race, but, every horse runs in the race whether played or not, horses not played, run for the banker-who does not pay anyone and takesall should any unplayed horse win. In case of a tie (dead heat), the banker pays both winners one-half of the amount that would ordinarily be paid if the horse won by itself. (Example)if th ace were in a dead heat, the player would get back only two (2) chipsincluding his own chip played on the ace.

Cards must be dealt out in the rotation specified. in above instructions. Mutuals may be played by fixing the same value for every chip, or token, in the game and by dividing the chips,

or tokens, played on losing horses, evenly between the chips, or tokens, played on the winner. If the winning horse should be one on which no play was made, all losings go into a jack-pot purse which is added to the winners purse of the next race.

As a further adaptation of this game, each winner may be credited with the number of points designated on the box I I. For example, referring to Figure 2, the winner which would be the player who selected the box having the full house would be credited with seven points, as the predetermined value odds are seven to one. A maximum number of points may be fixed for a prize, such as, for example, one hundred points, five hundred points, etc.; as determined by the group of players. Then the first player receiving this maximum score of points would be the winnerand receive the prize.

It will thus be seen that there has been provided by this invention a game in which the various objects hereinabove set forth, together with many advantages, are successfully achieved.

The features of novelty which I believe to be characteristic of my invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. My invention itself, however, both as to its fundamental principles and as to its particular embodiments, will best be understood by reference to the specification, in which I have described, by way of example only, and not in limitation, certain ways in which my invention may be practiced.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent, is:

1. In a game device wherein conventional playing cards are employed; a game board comprising a plurality of rows of fields, said rows being arranged on said board in spaced and parallel relation, four emblems carried by each of said fields and representing the four suits of said playing cards, indicia disposed on each of, said fields and indicating a value corresponding to a respective value of said playing cards, and a plurality of rows of sections respectively arranged adjacent said rows of fields, at least some of said section rows being positioned intermediate some of said field rows, each of said sections being adapted to supp rt a plurality of said playing cards, the indicia and emblems on each of said fields being adapted respectively for coordination with values and suits of playing cards when positioned on said sections respectively to thereby simulate hands of the game on said board.

2. In a game device wherein conventional playing cards are employed; a game board comprising a plurality of rows of fields, said rows being arranged on said board in spaced and parallel relation, emblems carried by each of said fields and representing suits of said playing cards, indicia disposed on each of said fields and indicating a value corresponding to a respective value of said playing cards, and a plurality of rows of sections respectively arranged adjacent said rows of fields, each of said sections being adapted to support a plurality of said playing cards, the indicia and emblems on each of said fields being adapted respectively for coordination with values and suits of playing cards when positioned on said sections respectively to thereby simulate hands of the game on said board.

JOHN DORFMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2615718 *Apr 15, 1950Oct 28, 1952Gordon L ByersGame board
US2673738 *Jun 25, 1951Mar 30, 1954Jenkins JosephGame board
US2712446 *Oct 12, 1950Jul 5, 1955Marie L MckeeverGameboard and playing cards
US2801855 *Sep 17, 1953Aug 6, 1957Clay Agnes DMathematics game apparatus
US4413828 *Mar 25, 1982Nov 8, 1983Gardner Anthony RMethod of playing a board game utilizing cards
US4560171 *Jul 30, 1984Dec 24, 1985Zacharias AnthonyPoker game
US5855369 *Sep 26, 1997Jan 5, 1999Lieberman; LeeEquipment for and methods of conducting a prize drawing game of chance
US6079711 *Jul 16, 1998Jun 27, 2000Melange Computer Services, Inc.Combination bingo and poker game
US7775524 *Jul 21, 2006Aug 17, 2010Cfph, LlcCard game
US7992873 *May 14, 2010Aug 9, 2011Cfph, LlcCard game
US8308165 *May 14, 2010Nov 13, 2012Cfph, LlcCard game
US8807567 *Sep 13, 2012Aug 19, 2014Cfph, LlcCard game
US20110024984 *May 14, 2010Feb 3, 2011Howard W LutnickCard game
US20110260403 *Jul 5, 2011Oct 27, 2011Lutnick Howard WCard game
US20130127114 *Sep 13, 2012May 23, 2013Howard W. LutnickCard game
WO2008151358A1 *Jun 10, 2008Dec 18, 2008Brett NutlandProperty trading board game incorporating aspects of poker
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/274, 273/269, 273/236, 273/277
International ClassificationA63F1/00, A63F1/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/04
European ClassificationA63F1/04