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Publication numberUS2356659 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 22, 1944
Filing dateOct 27, 1942
Priority dateNov 24, 1941
Publication numberUS 2356659 A, US 2356659A, US-A-2356659, US2356659 A, US2356659A
InventorsPaiva Aguiar Clovis De
Original AssigneePaiva Aguiar Clovis De
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nozzle for duodenal pump tubes
US 2356659 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug- 22- 1944- C. DEPAIVAv AGLjlAR i 22356659 NDZZLE FOR DUODENAL PUMP TUBES Filed oct. 2v. 1942 2 sheets-sheet 1 Clvls de Pcnvq Rqular INVENTOR ArrQRNEY Aug' 22 1944- yc. DE PANA AGUIAR 2,356,659

` I NOZZLE FR DUODENAL PUMP TUBES Filed oct. 27, 1942 2 sheetspsheet 2 Duab; NaI/M l l ArroRNEY I Patented Aug. 22, 1944 UNITED STATES .PATE-N .Y l y2,356,659

T oFFlcE NOZZLE FOR DUODENL`UMP TUBES Clovis de Paiva Aguiar, Juizlde Fora,

Gel-aes, Brazil Application October '27, 1942, Serial `l\I'|IJ.`-f463,506

In Brazil November-v 24, 1941 f 2 claims. ,(cl. 12e-27s) The presentinvention relates to improvements in the nozzles of `apparatus for the pump treat- `ment of sinuous organic channels and, more parzle body, usually with some of the holes provided at or near the forward end of the nozzle. These Eknown nozzles are advanced through the body channels which are to be intubated by means of -the gravity of the nozzle aided by the peristaltic movements of the-stomach and intenstines in case of aduodenal tubular pump. With the known duodenal pump nozzles, the progress of the nozezle lthrough the body cannot be accelerated by the discharge of liquid through the nozzle, and where such discharge takes place before the intubation has been completed, it actually retards the advance of the nozzle thereby prolonging the operationand causing fatigue and suffering to the patient.

It is one object of the present invention to eliminate this inconvenience as much as possible.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new nozzle for a duodenal tubular pump which facilitates and accelerates the forward progress of the nozzle and attached tube through the sinuous body channel leading into the duodenum.

Another object of the invention isto provide a nozzle for an intubating apparatus which permits the discharge of liquid from the nozzle before the latter has reached its nal position within the body cavity to be intubated without impairing the progress of the nozzle and attached tube through the body.

Still another object of the invention is to facilitate the intubation of sinuous body cavities by means of a nozzle designed to permit acceleration of its forward progress through a body channel by the discharge of liquid from the nozzle during its forward movement through the organic channel.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a duodental tubular pump with a nozzle ensuring greater rapidity of the operation and, consequently, less discomfort for the patient.

These and other objects Vare accomplished, ac-

cording to the invention, by the arrangement and combination of parts set forth in the following detailed description, dei-med in the appended 'claims 'and"illustratively-iexempled `in the accompanying drawings inv which:

Fig. 1 is an elevational-.sidefview of a duodenal pump nozzle according tothe invention,

Figs. 42 to 4 are longitudinalsections through three different embodiments, respectively, of nozzles according to the invention.

Fig. 5 shows anozzle .according to the inven- Y-tion attached tothe tube/of awduodenalpump of the usual type,.and y Fig. 6 illustrates diagrammatically the progress of a nozzle and tube'according to the invention through the stomach and into the duodenum of Ia patient.

As shown/in Fig. 1,Y a nozzle according to the invention consists generally of an oval body II .having a narrow neck I 2 provided with peripheral grooves I3 which serve to secure the nozzle in the usual Yrubber tube I 4, as shown in Fig. 5. The tube VIII is provided at predetermined points along its length with markings I5, I6, I'I to indicate-to theoperator the position-of the nozzle lduring the vprogress thereof through the body.

In each of the-nozzles illustrated in Figs. 2 to 4, a pumped fluid may enter the-body of the nozzle .through an axial inlet passage I8 extending through the neck I2 .and terminating inside of the body II of the nozzle at a point near the tip thereof, and the fluid is discharged in a generally rearward direction through orifices I9 provided in the rearl'portionjof the body- I I.

In the embodiment of the invention illustrated in Fig. 2, the forward end of the axial inlet passage communicates with the forward ends of a plurality of discharge channels 20 arranged parallel to the axis of the nozzle and to the axial pas- 4sage I8 and opening at their rear ends into the orifices I9.

According to Fig. 3, the inner surface of the nozzle opposite the forward end of the axial passage I8 is provided with a rearwardly pointing deflector surface 2I which has its apex disposed in alignment with the axis of the'nozzle and includes concave walls to guide the fluid emerging vfrom the forward end of said inlet passage smoothly towards said parallel discharge channels 20.

In the embodiment according to Fig. 4, the nozzle is provided with a rearwardly pointing deiiector surface 2|, as in Fig. 3, but, in this case, the discharge channels 22 which connect the forward end of the inlet passage I8 with the orifices I9 are not parallel to the axis of the nozzle but diverge rearwardly from said axis.

In use, a duodenal pump provided with a nozzle according to the invention, is introduced into the stomach of the patient in the usual manner. As soon, however, as the nozzle Il has reached the stomach liquid and air are injected into the nozzle ll through the tube l2` under a certain pressure at frequent intervals, until the nozzle has reached the desired position in the duodenum. Due to the internal shape of the nozzle, the liquid, thus injected under pressure, is forced to spurt out in iine strong jets from the rear part of the nozzle, as indicated by the arrows in Figs. 2 to 4, thus producing a forward propelling action similar to that utilized in rocket propulsion,

thus facilitating and accelerating the forward progress of thenozzle and attached tube from the stomach into and partly through the duodenum (see Fig. 6).

Since the value of the propelling force exerted by the fluid jets emerging from the nozzle Il Care must be taken in each case that the nature of the iiuids, the pressures and the volumes employed are such as are perfectly tolerated by the organism.

I claim:

1. In an apparatus for the pump tube treatment of sinuous organic channels, the combination with a flexible tube, of a nozzle, comprising a bulb-shaped body having a rounded forward end end, at its rear end, a short neck of reduced diameter to which said flexible tube is attached,

said nozzle being provided with an axial inlet passage leading through said neck into said body, and a plurality of discharge channels of relatively small diameter communicating inside said `body with said inlet passage, all of said discharge channels emerging from said body in agenerally Vrearward direction and being so arranged that upon the latter and the attached exible tubeV M increases in inverse ratio to the angle formed by the jets with the axis of the nozzle, particularly good propulsion eects are obtained with nozzles in which the discharge channels v are arranged parallel to the axis `oi the nozzle and outside of the outer periphery of the neck l2, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3.

Another way for obtaining a good forward pro'- pelling eiciency is to provide inside of the nozzle a deflector surface as shown in Figs. 3 and 4 which serves to guide the liquid emerging fromy the inlet passage smoothly into the discharge channels 20, 22, thus eliminating losses of energy due to swirling.

Nozzles according to the invention may be used not only for duodenal pump tubes but also for the intubation of other sinuous body channels with such modifications as may be necessary in each case.

The nozzles according to the invention may be propelled forwardly by means of the injection of liquid only into the nozzle. Y A greater eiiiciency, however, is obtained if a liquid and a gas, such as air, are injected in succession under a certain pressure. The moment of maximum propulsion is then that which coincides with the sudden release from pressure of the gas after the last po-rtion of the liquid has passed out from the nozzle through the orifices I9.

A satisf-actory result is obtained if water and air are injected into the exible tube I4 by means of an ordinary syringe or simiIarinjectOr.

jets of iiuid emitted from said discharge channels emerge from said body in a direction substantially parallel to the axis ofthe latter and outside of the outer periphery of said constricted neck, whereby the introduction of a fluid under pressure through said tube into said nozzle and the emission of suc-h fluids through said discharge channels tends to exert a forwardly propelling force on said nozzle and the attached flexible tube.

2. In an apparatus for the pump tube treatment of sinuous organic channels, the co-mbination with a flexible tube, of a nozzle, comprising a bulb-shaped body having a rounded forward end and, at its rear end, a short neckof reduced diameter to which said flexible tube is attached, said nozzle being provided with an axial inlet passage leading through said neck into said body to a point near the forward end thereof, a plurality of discharge channels of relatively smally CLOVIS DE PAIVA AGUIAR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3071137 *Aug 18, 1960Jan 1, 1963Niebel Benjamin WAnimated intestinal tube
US3485237 *Mar 20, 1967Dec 23, 1969Rca CorpSelf-propelling hose
US3665928 *Oct 6, 1969May 30, 1972Guercio Louis R M DelSelf propelled catheter
US3780740 *Nov 1, 1972Dec 25, 1973Rhea JIntubation device and method of advancing a tube past the pylorus
US4403985 *May 12, 1981Sep 13, 1983The United States Of America As Represented By The Department Of Health And Human ServicesJet controlled catheter
US4475902 *Mar 23, 1982Oct 9, 1984Werner SchubertDevice for introducing medical instruments into a body
US4717381 *May 13, 1986Jan 5, 1988Kos Medical Technologies, Ltd.Hydrodynamically propelled catheter
US4769006 *Jun 26, 1987Sep 6, 1988Kos Medical Technologies, Ltd.Hydrodynamically propelled pacing catheter
US5616137 *Feb 22, 1995Apr 1, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyLow velocity aortic cannula
US5643226 *Oct 6, 1994Jul 1, 1997Minnesota Mining And ManufacturingLow velocity aortic cannula
US5685865 *Oct 7, 1994Nov 11, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyLow velocity aortic cannula
US6918517 *Oct 30, 2003Jul 19, 2005Jui-Hung ShuNozzle for a sanitary cleansing device
US6958059Dec 28, 2001Oct 25, 2005Medtronic Ave, Inc.Methods and apparatuses for drug delivery to an intravascular occlusion
US7841976Mar 23, 2007Nov 30, 2010Thoratec CorporationHeart assist device with expandable impeller pump
US7927068Jun 9, 2008Apr 19, 2011Thoratec CorporationExpandable impeller pump
US7998054Sep 23, 2009Aug 16, 2011Thoratec CorporationImplantable heart assist system and method of applying same
US8118724Dec 4, 2007Feb 21, 2012Thoratec CorporationRotary blood pump
US8376707Mar 25, 2011Feb 19, 2013Thoratec CorporationExpandable impeller pump
US8485961Jan 4, 2012Jul 16, 2013Thoratec CorporationImpeller housing for percutaneous heart pump
US8535211Jul 1, 2010Sep 17, 2013Thoratec CorporationBlood pump with expandable cannula
US8591393Jan 5, 2012Nov 26, 2013Thoratec CorporationCatheter pump
US8597170Jan 4, 2012Dec 3, 2013Thoratec CorporationCatheter pump
US8684902Dec 4, 2007Apr 1, 2014Thoratec CorporationRotary blood pump
US8684904Aug 15, 2013Apr 1, 2014Thoratec CorporationBlood pump with expandable cannula
US8721517Mar 13, 2013May 13, 2014Thoratec CorporationImpeller for catheter pump
WO2005104928A1 *Apr 27, 2005Nov 10, 2005Charles Alexander MosseFluid propelled endoscope
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/95.2, 604/275
International ClassificationA61M3/02, A61M3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M3/0279
European ClassificationA61M3/02H