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Publication numberUS2359681 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 3, 1944
Filing dateJul 5, 1943
Priority dateJul 5, 1943
Publication numberUS 2359681 A, US 2359681A, US-A-2359681, US2359681 A, US2359681A
InventorsRovick Max I
Original AssigneeRovick Max I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sole for shoes
US 2359681 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 3,- 1944. M. 1. ROVICK SOLE FOR SHOES Filed July 5, 1943 Patented Oct. 3, 1944 UNlTED STATES PATENT OFFICE SOLE FOR SHOES Max I. Rovick, Chicago, Ill.

Application July 5, 1943, Serial No. 493,628

6 Claims.

This invention relates to shoes and more particularly to the soles of shoes, especially a sole which may be made as a complete article of manufacture and sale to shoe manufacturers or shoe repairmen.

It is one of th objects of the present invention to provide a shoe sole which will embody a minimum of leather and yet, when incorporated in a shoe and viewed from the side, will present the appearance of an ordinary leather sole.

It is a still further object of the present invention to provide a shoe sole which may be made of non-scarce materials such as, for instance, canvas, and which may be used in the fabrication of shoes in the same manner and on the same machines as present leather soles are used.

It is a still further object of the present invention to provide a shoe sole which may be made of canvas and yet which will have the necessary resiliency, elasticity and wearing qualities.

The attainment of the above and further objects of the present invention will be apparent from the following specification taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing forming a part thereof.

In the drawing:

Figure 1 is a side view of a shoe embodying the sole of the present invention;

Figure 2 is a bottom view of a shoe sole made in accordance with the present invention;

Figure 3 is a transverse sectional view taken along the line 33 of Figure 2; and.

Figure 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 4-4 of Figure 1.

In Figure 1 I have shown one standard type of shoe to which the sole of the present invention has been applied, it being understood that the invention is equally applicable to other types of shoes. The shoe of Figure 1, indicated in general by the reference numeral l, includes a shoe upper 2, and the sole 3 of the present invention. The sole is stitched to a welt 4 which projects from the shoe upper in the usual manner. Since the construction of the shoe upper and the welt projecting therefrom are well known in the art and form no part of the present invention, a further description and illustration thereof is not necessary at this time.

The sole of the present invention consists of a base layer 5 of strong cloth, such as, for instance, canvas or duck suitably treated to waterproof the same, a filler 6 of felt or of sponge material, which may be paper impregnated with asphalt or tar, or other soft filler material, and a top layer 1 of paper. The top layer 1 consists of a number of sheets of tough paper or the like secured together by thin layers of asphalt, rubber cement or other water-proofing material 9. The intermediate layer or filler 6 of felt is of lesser width than the width of the top and bottom layers. A narrow strip l2 of leather extends around the lower perimeter of the sole. The bottom layer 5, top layer 1 and leather strip l2 are all sewed together by a continuous lin of stitching [4. It is to be noted that the line of stitching I4 is adjacent the inner edge of the strip l2 rather than adjacent the outer edge thereof. The edge of the canvas at l6, on the outer side of the line of stitching I4, is coated with a waterproofing material such as, for instance, shellac, as is also the rim of the bottom surface of the layer 1 between the edge of the top layer and the line of stitching M. This not only waterproofs the edge of the sole but also adheres the crossed strands at the edge of the layer 5 and inhibits unraveling of the strands.

To fabricate the shoe the sole is secured to the welt 4 of the shoe upper 2 by a line of stitching [8 or in any other known manner, as by cementing the sole to the welt. Thereafter a filler IQ, of the shape of the inside of the shoe, is placed on the interior of the shoeto bring the top surface of the sole approximately flush with the corresponding surface 20 of the shoe upper. Thereafter an inner sole 2| of the usual construction is placed in the shoe, which inner liner rests on the filler l9 and on the adjacent parts of the shoe upper.

It is to be noted that the lower surface of the base layer 5 is below the lower surface of the rim l2, hence the wear on the sole is at the base layer. Due to the nature of the material of the base layer, consisting of crossed strands, the shoe is less likely to slip or slide on a slippery surface. Sliding may further be inhibited by cutting the base layer 5 that is to be used in the manufacture of the sole, on a bias with respect to the longitudinal axis of the sole, so that all the cords of the base layer are at a substantial angle to the longitudinal axis of the sole. After the base layer 5 has Worn the shoe may be resoled by cementing or sewing a leather sole directly to the bottom of the worn sole, leaving the strip or rim l2 in place, as is usual in standard shoe repairing operations.

In compliance with the requirements of the patent statutes I have here shown and described a preferred embodiment of my invention. It is, however, to be understood that the invention is not limited to the precise construction here shown, the same being merely illustrative of the principles of the invention. What I consider new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A shoe outsole comprising upper and lower layers of substantially identical shape, a narrow rim strip along the marginal edge of the lower layer, means securing the two layers and the strip together, and a filler pad of substantially the thickness of the rim strip interposed between the two layers and with the pad terminating short of the securing means so that the securing means does not extend through the pad.

2. A shoe outsole comprising upper and lower layers of substantially identical shape, a narrow rim strip along the marginal edge of the lower layer, a row of stitching securing the two layers and the strip together, and a filler pad interposed between the two layers and with the pad terminating short of the row of stitching so that the stitching does not extend through the pad.

3. A shoeoutsole comprising upper and lower layers of substantially identical shape, a narrow rim strip along the marginal edge on the under side of the lower layer, a row of stitching along the edge of the outsole securing the two layers and the strip together, a filler pad interposed between the two. layers and with the pad terminating short of the row of stitching so that the stitching does not extend through the pad, and waterproofing means at the edge of the lower layer outside of the loopof stitching.

4. A shoe outsole comprising a lower surfacing layer of fabric, a water-proof adhering coating along the edge of the lower surfacing layer to inhibit raveling of the thread of the fabric, a strip of flexible material extending along the marginal edge of the lower surfacing layer at the bottom surface thereof, and means securing the strip and the surfacing layer together.

5. A shoe outsole comprising a lower surfacing layer of fabric, an upper surfacing layer overlying the lower layer, a filler pad interposed be tween the tWo layers, a strip of flexible material extending along the marginal edge of the lower surfacing layer at the bottom surface thereof, and stitching securing the strip and the two surfacing layers together, the filler pad terminating short of the stitching so that the stitching does not extend through the pad, the stitching being located adjacent the inner edge of the flexible strip.

6. ,A shoe outsole comprising a lower surfacing layer of fabric, a waterproof adhering coating along the edge of the lower surfacing layer to inhibit raveling of the thread of the fabric, an upper surfacing layer overlying the lower layer, a strip of flexible material extending along the marginal edge of the lower surfacing layer at the bottom surface thereof, and stitching securing the strip and the two surfacing layers together. 7 i i MAX I. ROVICK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2597879 *Feb 9, 1951May 27, 1952Arnold LevinLaminated cushioning sole for shoes
US4053995 *Jul 23, 1976Oct 18, 1977Melvin SheinOrthopedic shoe
US5850703 *Jul 23, 1997Dec 22, 1998Boot Royalty Company, L.P.Cushioned insole
US6226895 *Jun 25, 1998May 8, 2001Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Footwear construction
US8127468Jun 10, 2009Mar 6, 2012Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Footwear construction
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/30.00R, 36/17.00R
International ClassificationA43B13/12, A43B13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/12
European ClassificationA43B13/12