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Publication numberUS2360155 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1944
Filing dateOct 1, 1942
Priority dateOct 1, 1942
Publication numberUS 2360155 A, US 2360155A, US-A-2360155, US2360155 A, US2360155A
InventorsLynn H Latta, Joseph H Nuffer
Original AssigneeAir Way Electric Appl Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suction cleaner
US 2360155 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 10, 1944. J. H. NU FFER ETAL 2,360,155

I SUCTION CLEANER Filed Oct. 1, 1942 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS Jade 0 4 fi. 72a 25%; BY 7-6. Lafa;

Oct. 10, 1944- J. H. NUFFER ETAL 2,360,155

SUCTION CLEANER Filed .Oct. 1 1942 2 sheets-sheet 2 1 16% J66 J62 s o 90 3nventor v Cittorneg Patented Oct. 10, 1944 SUCTION CLEANER Joseph H. Nufl'erflloledo, Ohio, and Lynn H.

Latta,

Deerfleld, Ill., assignors to Air-Way Electric Appliance Corporation, Toledo, Ohio, a corporation of Delaware Application October 1, 1942, Serial No. 460,362

17 Claims.

This application relates to suction cleaners of the type wherein the filtering and dust collecting unit is located between the cleaning tool and the suction unit, within an imperforate housing from which the air is evacuated by the suction unit so as to cause a dust laden stream of air to be drawn into the collecting receptacle from the cleaning tool. The primary object of the invention is to embody this type of arrangement in a relatively economical cleaning implement almost wholly contained within a slender, elongated, streamlined body, symmetrical withreierence to the longitudinal axis thereof. In particular, the invention aims to achieve, in an implement of such form, maximum cleaning efilciency coupled with minimum diameter of the body of the implement.

A further object of the invention is to provide a suction cleaner wherein the highly desirable dust collector receptacle and housing arrangement illustrated in the application of Dewey M. Dow et al. Serial Number 337,836, filed May 29, 1940, and issued April 13., 1943, as U. S. Patent 2,316,674, characterized particularly by the ease with which the receptacle may be removed from and replaced in the housing, is incorporated in an implement having the slender, streamlined and symmetrical form above referred to. More specifically, the invention aims, in this respect, to provid a suction cleaner incorporating an elongated, slender, streamlined body which comprises two sections, separable from each other along a plane transverse to the longitudinal axis of the body, one of the sections incorporating the dust collecting and air filteringmechanism and the other section incorporating the suction unit, access to the collecting receptacle for the purpose of removing and replacing the same being obtained by breaking" the body along this transverse plane, and the securing of the receptacle in its housing and the sealing of the mouth thereof to the nozzle which delivers the dust laden air stream, being accomplished merely by bringing the sections together after the receptacle has been inserted in the housing section.

Another object ,of the invention is to provide a suction cleaner which has its suction unit locatedin the lower region thereof and its dust collecting and filtering unit located in the upperregion thereof so as to concentrate the weight in the lower region, and, in addition, embodies an arrangement wherein the connection between the cleaning tool and the body of the cleaner is in the lower portion of the body, the dust laden air stream is passed upwardly through the lower portion of the body so as to reach the collecting and filtering unit and the filtered air is thence drawn back into the lower region of the body by the suction unit, and wherein the receptaclemouth iscentrally disposed, the passage for the dust laden air stream is direct, and the body is symmetrical in cross section and of minimum diameter coupled with maximum cleaning efiiciency.

Other and further objects of the invention will occur to those skilled in the arts to which this invention pertains as the description proceeds which, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, sets forth a preferred embodiment and selected modifications are not to be construed as limitations of the invention but only as illustrative thereof and any and all modiflcations, alterations and variations of structure coming within the spirit and scope of the appended claims which limit and define the instant invention are deemed to be included herein.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is an inverted plan view of a suction cleaner embodying the invention;

Fig. 2- is a side elevation of the same, partially in section;

Fig. 3 is an end view of the filte'ring section of the cleaner;

Fig. 4 is an end view of the motor fan section of the cleaner;

Fig. 5is a detail sectional view of a portion of the cleaner;

Fig. 6 is a side elevation, partially in section, of a modified form of the invention;

Fig. '7 is a side elevation, partially in section, of a vertical cannister type cleaner embodying th invention;

Fig. 8 is an inverted plan view of the cleaner shown in Fig. 7; and

Fig. 9 is a partial end view of the filtering section of the cleaner shown in Fig. 7.

As an example of one form in which our invention may be embodied, we have shown in Fig. 1 a suction cleaner embodying a cleaning tool indicated generally at A, a body indicated generally at B and a handle indicated generally at C. The body 3 is elongated, symmetrical, of minimum diameter coupled with maximum cleaning efiiciency, and, in general, streamlined so as to be easy to handle, easy to store in a closet, and pleasing in appearance. It is contemplated that the invention, in this form, will be embod led in a relatively small and inexpensive cleaner to be used for doing supplementary cleaning, 1. e., the cleaning of a small area as contrasted to a complete cleaning of an entire living quarters. At present it is customary to use a lightca'rpet sweeper 'for supplementary cleaning in cases where the amount of cleaning to be done does not justify the trouble of getting out the usual suction cleaner. Our invention aims to provide, in the implement shown in Fig. 1, a suction cleaner which is comparable to a carpet sweeper in lightness, ease of manipulation, and the readiness with which it can be removed from and stored in a closet.

The body B is formed in two sections, indicated generally at I and I2. The section I0 incorporates the suction unit which comprises a multiple stage fan, indicated generally at I4, a motor for driving the same, indicated generally at I6, and a casing comprising a. lower section or fan casing 20 and upper section or motor casing 22. Joined to the housing I8 is the cleaning tool A which, in form of the invention shown in Fig. 1, may be formed integrally with the lower section 20 of the casing l8.

The section l2 of the cleaner body comprises a tubular housing 26 closed at its upper end by a cap 28 in which is secured the cleaner handle 30. Within the housing 6, and spaced from the inner surface thereof is an air pervious sleeve 32, preferably of rigid sheet material. Within the sleeve 32 is supported the air porous dust receptacle 34 which is in the form of an elongated bag having one end closed and having at its other end an inlet end member 36 which is clamped between the body sections I6 and I2 when the latter are joined together as shown in Fig. 2. The end member 36 has an inlet 38 through which the dust laden air stream is injected into the receptacle 34.

Dust laden air received by the cleaning tool A is delivered to the receptacle 34 through a passage extending axially through the center of the fan I4 and the motor I6. In the form of the invention shown in Fig. 2, this passage is formed by a continuous suction tube 40 the upper end of which constitutes a nozzle 42 adapted to ex tend into the receptacle through the inlet 38. The tube 40 is fixedly mounted in the casing I8, the lower end being fixed in the neck 44 joining the cleaning tool A to the casing section 26, and the upper end being fixed in a boss 46 in a spider 48 which forms the upper end portion of the casing section 22. By thus extending the suction tube through the center of the fan and motor, it is possible to utilize the full cross sectional area of the casing I8 for accommodating a fan of maximum diameter-and therefore of maximum suction capacity. At the same time, it is possible to maintain symmetry in the cross sectional shape of the casing, the suction tube being co-axial with all other parts. A further advantage arises from the fact that in passing the suction tube through the center of the fan and motor it is possible to make the suction passage perfectly straight, eliminating bends that would be necessary if the passage were brought from and reduces its length to a minimum, -Both of these factors increase the efficiency of the clean- Eliminating the bends in mounted in the casing section 22 between a shoulder 50 therein and a collar 52. The armature 54 of the motor is mounted upon a hollow shaft 56 telescoped upon the suction tube 42 and journaled on bearings 58 and 60, the former interposed between the tube 42 and an enlarged collar 62 on the lower end of the tubular shaft 56, and the latter being mounted between the upper end of the shaft 56 and a boss 64 on the spider 48.

The fan I4 includes the impellers 66 and 68 respectively, operating in fan chambers formed between the lower end of the casin section '26 and a partition 74 and between a partition 16 and a partition I8, respectively. The impellers 66 and 68 are secured in spaced relationship on the shaft 56 between the enlarged collar 62,

I spacing sleeves 66, and the armature 54.

Attached to the lower end of the filter housthe inner periphery of which defines the mouth er by reducing the resistance to the passage of v the dust laden air stream.

The motor I6 comprises a field 24 which is through which the receptacle 34 is inserted into the housing 26. The spider 94 is connected by a hinge 96 to the casing section 22 and carries a latch 98 adapted to latch the two sections of the cleaner body together. The inlet end of the receptacle 34 has a peripheral flange I02 which is adapted to be engaged between the end wall 48 of the casing section 22 and the spider 94 when the body sections I0 and I2 are latched together. The flange I62 is connected to the central portion to the end member 36 by an offset wall portion I64, to which is stitched the porous ,wall portion of the receptacle 3 3. This receptacle'construction is illustrated more clearthe nozzle 42 and abuts the end of the boss 46.

The ring I06 is adapted to engage the end member 36 of the receptacle .when the body sections I0 and I2 are latched together, so as to securely seal the nozzle 42 to the inlet 38 of the recep- 'tacle. The body sections I0 and I2 are simultaneously sealed by a sealing ring I06 mounted in a channel I08 in the spider 9t and engaging the end wall 46 of the casing section 22.

The air exhausted from the receptacle 34 passes through the supporting sleeve 32 into the annular space II2 defined between the sleeve 32 and the housing 26, thence passes through an annular series of apertures H4 in the spider 94, thence through a corresponding annular series of apertures H6 in the end Wall 28 of the motor casing, thence through the motor it (between the armature 54 and the field 2d), and. thence through the fan inlet 92 into the upper fan chamber, thence through the ports and the inlet 82 into the lower fan chamber and then through the outlet apertures 64 in the casing 20, to the atmosphere. the fan is applied to the housing 26 through the motor housing 22 and across the dividing plane between the sections I0 and I2. The gasket I06 seals the two sections together against the loss of suction across this dividing plane. The gasket I00, On the other hand, seals the nozzl 42 to the receptacle 34 so that dust will not escape into the space between the receptacle and the end wall 48. The air in passing through the motor I6, cools the same. Not until after the air has passed through the motor is it heated by compression in'the fan I4, and the heat thus developed is immediately dissipated into the atmosphere by the discharge of the air through Thus the suction from 9,860,105 the outlet apertures 64. The passage of .air

through the center of the motor also helps to dissipate heat developed in the motor.

The supporting sleeve 32 is received within the end cap 28 at its upper end and abuts against the inner side of the spider 94 at its lower end.

Current is delivered to the motor I6 through brushes I20 and a motor cord I22 which extends from the brushes I20, through the hinge 96, then through the spider 94 and, the space II2 between the sleeve 32 and the housing 26, and thence through the hollow handle 30 to a switch I24 mounted in the handle 30. From the switch I24 a service cord I26 extends through the end of the handle.

The receptacle 34, when filled, may be quickly made accessible for removal by turning the cleaner upside down, releasing the latch 98, and hingas to uncover the mouth of the filterhousing 26. Th receptacle is then simply lifted out of the housing 26 and disposed of and a fresh receptacle is inserted in the housing, the flange 46 thereof serving to accurately center the end member in the housing. The section I is then returned to its normal position in alignment with the section I2, causing the nozzle 42 to enter the inlet 38 of the receptacle end member36. At the same time, the end wall 40 of the section I0 will engage the flange I02 of the end member 36, securely clamping the receptacle in place, and the sealing ring I06 will engage the end member 36 to seal the nozzl 42 in the inlet 38.

In the form of the invention shown in Fig. 6, the suction passage from the floor tool 24 to the nozzle 42a is'partially formed by the rotating shaft 56a on which the armature 54a and the impellers 66a and 66a of the fan I4a are directly mounted. The shaft 560, is mounted inbearings 58a and 60a respectively, the bearing50a being mounted in a cup I30 on a lower fan case wall I32, and the bearing 60a being mounted in a cup I34 on the upper end wall 48a of the motor housing 22a. The bearings 58a and 60a are looked upon the shaft 56a by nuts I35 and I36 respectively, and is sealed with reference to the fan and motor casing by means of bellows seals I36 and I40 engaged between the nuts I34, I36 and the cupped portions I30, I34.

The impellers 66a and 63a and the armature 54a are spaced apart on the shaft 56a by means of spacing sleeves 86a.

The wall member I32, together with partition numbers 14a, 16a and 180., which are provided with suitable peripheral flanges by means of which they are supported within the casing sections 20a and 22a and properly spaced apart, form the upper and lower fan chambers, the former having an inlet 92a and an outlet 80a, and the latter having an inlet 02a and an outlet 84a. The field 48a of the motor I6a is engaged between a shoulder 50a in the casingsection 22a and a peripheral flange of the partition wall 13a on the cup I34 and registering with the upper end of the motor shaft 661:.

The casing 20a is provided with an outlet 90 to which a flexible hose may be attached when 1 ing the section I0 back upon the section I2 so it is desired to use the cleaner for blowing operations. The lower end of the cup I30 is abutted against theupper end of the suction tube 10 so as to seal of! the latter from the chamber 12 through which the air passes from the fan casing outlet 34a to the blower outlet 00.

The dust collecting mechanism is the same as that shown in Fig. 2, and the same reference characters have been used to designate the same, with the exception that the exponent n. has been added.

In Fig. 7 we have illustrated the invention as embodied in a cleaner of the upright cannister type, wherein the dust collecting unit I2!) is superimposed upon the motor-fan unit I0b. The motor fan unit is mounted upon a, base I50 which in turn is mounted upon casters I52 swiveled to the legs I54 thereof. The motor I6b and fan I4b are mounted within a skirt I56 which is mounted on the base I50. encased within a motor casing I59 which is suspended within the skirt I56 through the medium of a resilient mounting I58. A fan casing I60 is secured to the lower end of the motor casing I59 and the bottom thereof is provided with an open collar I62 which communicates with one end of a suction conduit I64 formed in the base I50, being sealed therein by a grommet I66 of soft rubber or the like. To the upper end wall I68 of the motor casing I59 is secured a plate I10 which forms a seat for the flange I02b of the receptacle end member 36b. The seating of the flange I02b against the plate I10, under the pressure of the dust collector housing assembly, is yleldingly accommodated by the grommet I66 and the yieldable mounting I58, the latter serving to cushion vibrations originating in the motor, fan assembly.

The hollow shaft 56b of the motor-fan assembly encircles the stationary tube 40b the lower end of which is mounted in the collar I62 and the upper end of which is piloted in the outwardly cupped central portion I12 of the plate I10. Between the cupped portion I12 and the top wall I68 is mounted a bearing 60b in which the upper end of the shaft 56b is journaled. In a partition wall I15 separating the motor casing I59 from the fan casing I60, is mounted a bearing 58]) in which the intermediate portion of the shaft 56b is journaled.

Upon the upper end of the suction tube 40b is mounted a resilient valve nozzle 42b having a sealing ring I06b at the base thereof.

The construction of the motor I6b and the fan Mb is substantially the-same as that of the forms previously described, and the same reference bodied in this type of cleaner is the low level at which it permits the pull from the hose tobe applied to the cannister, so as to make it possible The motor I6b is r ing 58 within the skirt I56.

to pull the cannister about without toppling it over under the pull of the hose, and this constitutes one of the objects of the invention.

The filtering and dust collecting unit includes the filtering receptacle 34b which is receivable within a perforated supporting sleeve 32b the upper end of which is received within the rim of the dome member 28b closing the upper end of the housing 26b. The lower end of the sleeve 32b is piloted between a plurality of lugs I16 projecting inwardly from the collar 94b in which the lower end of the housing tube 262) is Secured. The sleeve 32b has an outwardly turned flange I18 which is supported against the under sides of the lugs I16 and forms an annular clamping member for engaging the upper side of the flange I021) of the end member 361) and clamping the same against the plate I10.

The construction just described constitutes an improvement over the filtering mechanism shown in Fig. 1, in that the lower end of the bag supporting sleeve'is made to function as the upper clamping member, thus simplifying the construe-- tion of the collar 94b and facilitating the assembly of the parts of the filtering section.

The collar 94b is hinged at 96b to the shirt chamber I82 formed above the resilient mount- The chamber I82 communicates with the interior of the motor housing I59 through an inlet I84 in the latter, which inlet is located above the field24b so that the air exhausted from the filter housing 261) will be drawn through the motor before reaching the fan Mb. The air passes from the motor housing into the fan housing I60 through apertures I86 in the partition wall I15. From the fan casing I60 the air passes through exhaust apertures I88 into the chamber 12b formed in the skirt I58 between the base I50 and mounting I58, and thence passes through an outlet 90b in the base I50. The outlet 90b is adapted to have a flexible hose connected thereto for the purpose of utilizing blowing tools.

In the operation of the cleaner, a dust laden air stream coming from a cleaning tool will pass through the suction conduit I64 into the suction tube b and will thence be delivered upwardly through the nozzle 42b into the receptacle 34b. The air will be drawn through the wall of the receptacle 34b and thence downwardly through the space I94 between the sleeve 32b and the housing 261) thence downwardly between the lugs I16 and through the annular space between the flange I12 and the rim of the collar 94b, thence into the chamber I82.

When the receptacle 34b is filled, the latch 98b is released and the filter housing 261) is tilted, about the hinge 96b, to a position where its normally upper end is resting against the floor. The receptacle is then changed in the manner previously described.-

The upper end of the filter housing is provided with a suitable handle I92 to facilitate the carrying of the cannister from place to place and the manipulation of the filter housing during the changing of filter receptacles. This handle may be formed integrally with the dome member 28b as shown, or may be separate and secured to any.

part of the upper region of the filter housing.

We claim as our invention:

1. In a vacuum cleaner, an air filtering and.

dust collecting receptacle, a housing receiving said receptacle, a suction fan for evacuating the air from said housing, a cleaning tool, a duct for conveying dust laden air from said cleaning tool to said receptacle, said duct passing axially through said fan, and a casing for said fan associated with said housing and providing a passage affording communication between an exterior portion of said receptacle and the inlet of said fan.

2. In a vacutun cleaner, an air filtering and dust collecting receptacle, a housing enclosing said receptacle, a suction fan for evacuating the air from said housing, a motor for driving said fan, a cleaning tool, a duct for conveying dust laden air from said cleaning tool to said receptacle, said duct passing through said motor and through said fan, and a casing forsaid fan associated with said housing and providing a passage affording communication between an exterior portion of said receptacle and the inlet of said fan.

3. In a vacuum cleaner, an elongated housing adapted to enclose an air filtering and dust collecting receptacle having a mouth disposed at one end of the housing, and a suction unit including a casing associated with said housing at said one end thereof and coaxially therewith, a suction fan in said casing, said casing providing an annular passage communicating at one end with said one end of the housing exteriorly of said receptacle and at its other end with the inlet of said fan whereby said fan may evacuate air from said housing and receptacle, and a duct for'conveying dust-laden air to said receptacle mouth, said duct extending along the common axis of said housing and casing and passing through the center of said fan.

4. In a vacuum cleaner, a dust collecting and air filtering receptacle having an inlet end provided with a mouth, a housing enclosing said receptacle and having at one end an air outlet disposed about the periphery of said inlet end of the receptacle and a suction unit comprising a casing associated with said one end of the housing, a suction fan in said casing adapted to draw air from said housing through said outlet and through said casing, and a duct for conveying dust laden air to said receptacle mouth, said duct passing through the center of said fan.

5. A vacuum cleaner as defined in the preceding claim, including an electric motor coaxial with and in driving relation to said fan, said mo tor being disposed in the air stream passing through said casing from said housing to said fan and said duct passing axially through said motor.

6. In a vacuum cleaner. a suction fan, a cleaning tool, a filtering receptacle, a duct for conveying dust laden air from said cleaning tool to said filtering receptacle, said duct passing axially through said fan, said fan having an annular inlet encircling said duct, through which said fan is adapted to draw filtered air from said receptacle, and a housing for said receptacle having an air outlet communicating with the inlet of the fan. I 7. In a vacuum cleaner, a cleaning tool, a filtering receptacle, a suction fan an electric motor coaxial with and in driving relation to said .fan, a duct for conveying dust laden air-from said cleaning tool to said filtering receptacle, said duct passing axially through said fan and motor, said fan having an annular inlet encircling said duct through said fan and motor, said fan having an annular inlet encircling said duct, through which said fan is adapted to draw filtered air from said receptacle, and a casing enclosing said motor and fan and forming an annular passage for directing the filtered air through the motor for cooling the same, and thence into the fan.

9, In a vacuum cleaner, a casing having at one end a cleaning tool and adapted to communicate at its other end with dust collecting and air fil-, tering means, a suction fan in said casing for inducing a. flow of air therethrough to and from said dust collecting and filtering means, a duct passing axially through said fan, said duct at one end communicating with said tool for applying suction thereto and at its other end discharging to said collecting and filtering means and an annular passage defined between said duct and said casing for conveying the air stream away from said collecting and filtering means, said fan having an annular inlet encircling said duct and communicating with said annular passage.

10. In a vacuum cleaner, a casing having at one end a connection to a cleaning tool and adapted to communicate at its other end with a housing enclosing a dust collecting and air filtering receptacle having at the open end of said housing an inlet mouth, a suction tan in said casing adapted to withdraw filtered air from said open end of the housing, a motor for driving said fan, including an armature, a tubular shaft on which both said armature and said tan are mounted, and a tube passing axially through said shaft for conveying dust laden air from said cleaning tool connection to said receptacle, said tube terminating in a nozzle adapted to make connection with said mouth, said shaft being mounted for rotation about said tube.

v 11. A vacuum cleaner as defined in the preceding claim, wherein said housing is movable from 'a normal position in communication with said casing, with said duct in communication with said receptacle mouth, to a position wherein said one end of the housing is uncovered to permit the withdrawal of said receptacle and wherein said duct is separated from said mouth,

12. A vacuum cleaner as defined in the second preceding claim, wherein said receptacle has at said inlet end a flange extending outwardly from the body thereof, and wherein said casing is adapted to clamp said flange against said one end of the housing.

, fan within said casing adapted to draw air from having at one end an annular outlet for filtered air, a filtering receptacle receivable in said houswith one end thereof communicating with said outlet, and a fan within said casing; a cleaning said duct in communication with said mouth,

l3. In a vacuum cleaner, an elongated collector housing having at one end a handle and at its other end an annular outlet for filtered air, a filtering receptacle receivable in said housing and having an inlet end adapted to lie within the inner circumference of said outlet, said inlet end having a mouth, and a suction unit including a casing normally aligned with said housing, with one end thereof communicating with said outlet a cleaning tool on the other end of said casing, a

said housing through said outlet and through said casing, and a duct for conveying dust laden air from said tool to said mouth, said duct passing through the center of said fan.

14. A vacuum cleaner as defined in the preceding claim, wherein said duct extends in a straight line along the common axis of said housing and casing and through the center of said fan.

15. A vacuum cleaner as defined in the second preceding claim, wherein said receptacle has at said inlet end a flange extending outwardly from the body thereof, and wherein said casing and housing are relatively movable from normal positions in communication with each other, with and with said flange clamped between the adjacent ends of said casing and said housing, to positions wherein said other end of the housing is uncovered to permit the removal of said receptacle therefrom and wherein said duct is withdrawn from said mouth.

16. In a vacuum cleaner, a collector housing ing and having an inlet end adapted to lie within the inner circumference 01' said outlet, said inlet end havinga mouth; a suction unit including a casing normally aligned with said housing,

tool; and means for conveying dust laden air from said cleaning tool to said filtering receptacle mouth, said means comprising a duct passing through the center of said fan.

1'1. A vacuum cleaner as defined in claim 16,

wherein said receptacle has at said inlet end a I flange extending outwardly from the body thereof, and wherein said casing and housing are relatively movable from normal positions in communication with each other, with said 'duct in communication with said mouth, and, with said flange clamped between the adjacent ends 01 said casing and said housing, to positions wherein said other end of the housing is uncovered to permit the removal of 'said receptacle therefrom and wherein said duct is withdrawn from said mouth.

JOSEPH H. mm. LYNN n. narra.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2626418 *Sep 10, 1948Jan 27, 1953Kingston Products CorpNozzle casing for broom-type vacuum cleaners
US2746078 *Nov 2, 1950May 22, 1956Syntron CoVacuum cleaner
US2753434 *Nov 17, 1953Jul 3, 1956Jr Frederick K StormPortable hand-held suction device
US3193992 *Dec 20, 1962Jul 13, 1965Kingston Products CorpUpright vacuum cleaner
US4851019 *Apr 28, 1988Jul 25, 1989Vorwerk & Co. Interholding GmbhElectric vacuum cleaner
US4884314 *Nov 12, 1987Dec 5, 1989Black & Decker Inc.Portable blower
US4885013 *Apr 28, 1988Dec 5, 1989Vorwerk & Co. Interholding GmbhArrangement of filter bags in electric vacuum cleaners
US4961765 *Apr 14, 1989Oct 9, 1990Vorwerk & Co. Interholding GmbhElectrical vacuum cleaner and filter bag for same
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/344, 417/357, 415/199.1, 417/423.2, 15/327.6
International ClassificationA47L5/22, A47L9/10, A47L5/24
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/22, A47L5/28, A47L9/1427
European ClassificationA47L9/14D, A47L9/22, A47L5/28