Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2360231 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1944
Filing dateDec 23, 1940
Priority dateDec 23, 1940
Publication numberUS 2360231 A, US 2360231A, US-A-2360231, US2360231 A, US2360231A
InventorsHorton Frank J
Original AssigneeHorton Frank J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Folding chair
US 2360231 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. J. HORTON FOLDING CHAIR Filed Dec. 23, 1940 Zmbentor Frank J. Hon-Ion Patented Oct. 10, 1944 UNITED STATES FAENT OFFICE FOLDING CHAIR Frank J. Horton, Detroit, Mich. Application December 23, 1940, SerialNo. 371,323

2 Claims. c1. 155-150) 1 My invention relates to a new and useful improvement in a folding chai embodying a supporting structure having legs and a seat structure supported by the legs so constructed and arranged that the seat structure may be removed from the supporting structure and both structures folded into compact form.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a chair of this class that is simple in structure, economical of manufacture, durable, compact and highly efficient in use.

Another object of the invention is the provi' sion, ina chair of this class, of a seat-forming portion having a back swingably mounted thereon and so constructed and arranged that it may be quickly adjusted for positioning in different angularities relatively to the seat.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a chair having at opposite sides-thereof, a pair of crossed, pivotally mounted legs so constructed and arranged that the upper ends thereof will engage the cross bars of the seat frame in such a manner that the placing of weight upon the seat will serve to secure the legs in position.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a chair having a seat and a back connected together and provided on the seat with attaching hooks at the forward end thereof so that the seat,

when removed from its usual supporting legs, may i be mounted on a supporting ledge such as a boat seat or the like.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a chair having a supporting structure so arranged that it may be easily and quickly adapted for use in supporting a table.

Another object of the invention is the provision in a chair of this class having a supporting structure and a seat-forming structure so arranged and constructed that they are separable and may snap into position when assembled together and weight is placed thereon.

Other objects will appear hereinafter.

It is recognized that various modifications and changes may be made without departing from the scope of the invention and it is intended that such changes and modifications shall be brought within the claims attached hereto and forming a part hereof.

Forming a part of the specification is a drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational vieW of the invention.

Fig. 2 is a central vertical sectional view with a part broken away.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional view with parts broken away.

Fig. 4 is a side elevational View of the invention showing the parts incollapsed or folded form.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary view taken substantially on line 5-5 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 6 is a side elevational view of the supporting structure used as a table support.

In the chair I provide a frame having side rails 9 and IE1 connected by the front rail H and the rear rail 52. In the structure illustrated these rails are formed from tubular material circular in cross section. Connected to the side rails 9 and i0 and spanning the space between them are sinuous springs l3 which are connected together by coil springs l4, these springs serving as a support for 'upholstering or other suitable covering.- Each of the side rails 9 and i0 is provided with the upwardly, rearwardly directed inclined plate-like portion l5. Arod I6 which is projected through these plate-like portions serves to connect the oppositely disposed portions. Fixedly mountedon this rod at opposite sides is an abutment plate H. The outer end of the rod is angularly turned to provide the grip IS whereby the rod may be rocked manually. A back is provided which comprises a U shaped frame embodying the legs I8 and I8 carrying the upholstering supporting springs l9 and 251. This back is adapted to engage between the plates l5, each of the legs l8 and I8 being pivoted intermediate its ends adjacent their lower ends to the plate !5 by means of a rivet 2 l. The legs are connected together at their'lower ends by means of the cross bar 22, the upholstery springs I!) extending from the cross bar 22 upwardly to the top of the U shaped structure.

As shown in Fig. 1 the back may be rocked into two positions, the inclined position being indicated in dotted lines. When the structure is unfolded into the position shown in Fig. 1, the plate I! will be rocked downwardly into the position in Fig. 3 so that each of the legs I3 and I8 is engaged by one of the plates ll. Thus the back is prevented from swinging rearwardly from the full line position shown in Fig. 1. When it is desired to incline the back rearwardly to the dotted line position in Fig. 1 the user may, by gripping the angularly turned end l9, rock the rod l6 upwardly so that the plate H Will swing upwardly to lie against the flange 23 and thus the seat back may be swung into inclined position. The projection of the rod l6 through the platelike portions 15 is sufiiciently snug to prevent rocking of the rod by gravity.

As a supportin structure I provide a pair of front legs 25 and 26 which are connected together at their lower ends by a cross bar 21 and at their upper ends by a rod 28. I also provide a pair of rear legs 29 and 30 which are similarly connected together at their lower ends by a cross bar 21' and at thei upper ends by a rod 28'. The

- rear leg 29 and the front leg 25 are pivotally connected, intermediate their ends, by the rivet 30 and the front leg 26 and the rear leg 3| are pivotally connected together intermediate their ends by the rivet 32. Each of the legs is cut away at its upper end to provide a projecting, curved resilient tongue 33.

In assembling the structure the legs are placed in position so that the tongues of the legs engage over either the rail II or the rail I2 with the tongues n the other legs resting on the periphery of the corresponding rail. Downward pressure on the seat will then force the legs to slide apart at their upper ends so that the tongues on both of the legs engage the corresponding rails. As shown in Fig. 3 the tongue 33 is in position for riding over the rail I2. As it rides over the rail it is sprung out of its normal position so that there is thus a snapping of the legs into position on the engaged rails. When the tongue has snapped over the rail with which it engages, the chair may be picked up bodily by the seat structure, the legs being securely attached thereto. In order to disconnect the seat structure from the supporting structure it is but necessary to move the bottom ends of the legs inwardl toward each other a slight distance to disengage the'tongues from the rails.

When the supporting structure is in the position shown in Fig. 1 the rods 28 and 28' will engage the under surface of the rails 9 and Ill, these rods projecting outwardly beyond the outer faces of the legs 25 and 26 and 29 and 30 so that the tongue is securely locked in engaging position.

Mounted on the rail I l is a depending hook 31 whereby the seat structure may be mounted on a cross bar and used for a boat seat or the like.

In Fig. 6 I have shown the supporting structure supporting a table top 39 having hooks 40 projecting from the lower surface thereof. As

'shown in Fig. 6 the supporting legs may be positioned so that the rods 28 and 28' may engage It is believed-obvious from the description given that the various advantages sought may thus be obtained.

It is believed obvious that the seat structure with the back attached thereto may be discon-' nected from the supporting structure and rested upon a supporting body. When used in this manner, the chair is admirably adapted as a beach chair which may rest upon the ground and serve as a seat and back rest for the user.

What I claim as new is:

1. In a chair construction of the class de scribed, a seat-forming portion having a front rail and a rear rail in spaced apart relation; a supporting structure embodying a pair of sets of legs, each set comprising a pair of legs pivotly connected intermediate their ends; means for connecting the corresponding legs of each set together adjacent their lower ends; a rod connecting the corresponding legs of each set together adjacent their upper ends; and a resilient arcuate tongue on the upper end of each of said legs, forming an extension thereof and projected over the adjacent rail and engaged therewith and adapted, upon the spreading apart of the lower ends of said supporting legs, for snapping over the rail engaged and securing said supporting legs thereon, said rod lying in close engagement with the under surface of said seat-forming portion upon the snapping of said tongues over said rails.

2. In a chair construction of the class described, a seat-forming portion having a front rail and a rear rail in spaced apart relation; a supporting structure embodying a pair of sets of legs, each set comprising a pair of legs pivotally connected intermediate their ends; a rod connecting the corresponding legs. of each set together adjacent their upper ends; and a resilient arcuate tongue on the upper end of each of said legs, forming an extension thereof and projected over the adjacent rail and engaged therewith and adapted, upon the spreading apart of thelower ends of said supporting legs, for snapping over the rail'engaged and securing said supporting legs thereon, the relative location of said tongues and said rod being such that upon snapping of said tongues over said rail said rod will be in engagement with the under surface of said seatforming portion.

FRANK J. HORTON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2666681 *Mar 1, 1951Jan 19, 1954Shwayder BrothersConvertible folding tray table and coffee table
US2909215 *May 23, 1957Oct 20, 1959Mitchell George WFolding chair equipped for fishing
US3381998 *Nov 10, 1966May 7, 1968Robert A KelsoCombined folding chair and desk
US4184711 *Oct 12, 1978Jan 22, 1980Yasuo WakimotoFolding canvas chair
US8931832 *May 25, 2012Jan 13, 2015Fermi Chi Hung LauSwivel stool
US20130313864 *May 25, 2012Nov 28, 2013Fermi Chi Hung LauSwivel stool
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/461, 297/452.5, 297/51, 297/440.15, 108/118
International ClassificationA47C4/00, A47C4/24
Cooperative ClassificationA47C4/24
European ClassificationA47C4/24