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Publication numberUS2360909 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 24, 1944
Filing dateNov 23, 1942
Priority dateNov 23, 1942
Also published asDE969169C
Publication numberUS 2360909 A, US 2360909A, US-A-2360909, US2360909 A, US2360909A
InventorsCharles H Jones, Ernest R Swanson
Original AssigneeUniversal Winding Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Winding machine
US 2360909 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 24, 1944.

E. R. swANsoN ErAL 2,360,909

lWINDING' MACHINE Filed Nov. 25, 1942 4 Sheets-Sheet l f. fielding Oct. 2 4, 1944. E. R. swANsoN ETAL v 2,360,909

wINDING MACHINE Filed Nov. 25, 1942 4 sheets-shea 2 Z. fz/

Oct. 24, 1944. R. swANsoN :r1-Al. y2,360,909

WINDING MACHINE Filed Nov. 23, 1.942 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 ages of yarn, thread and similar Astrand material whatever Patented Oct. 24, 1944 ortica WINDING MACHINE Ernest B.. Swanson, Cranston, and Charles H.

Jones, Warwick, R. I., assignors to Universal Winding Company, Boston, Mass., arcorporation oi Massachusetts Application November 23. 1942. Serial No. 466,622

i4 Claims.

f This invention `relates to winding machines for producing cops, cones and other types 'of packstrand materials, either natural or synthetic.

By the term yarnas used in the following. specilcation and claims is meant anytype of the term package wound mass whatever its shape or form.

A principal object of the present invention is to provide a winding machine f or producing packages of yarn or the like suitable for fluid treatment, as in conditioning or dyeing the material, to insure uniform permeation of the uid to all parts of the yarn mass.

Another objectl of the invention is to provide a winding machine for winding packages-of yarn or the like with all portions thereof of substantially uniform density, particularly as regards the ends of the package inthe se1vages," so-called. where the reversal of the turns of winding tend to form a denser and less penetrable mass.

Another object of the invention is to provide .a machine for winding yarn and similar mate- 'rials into packages of generally cylindrical or conical form with tapered or frusto-conical ends its characteristics, and is intended to indicate a serving to support the windings more securely and prevent overruns or so-called stitches on the end-faces of the packages. v

Another object of the invention is to provide a machine for winding packages of yarn or the like with the return bends `or knuckles of the multiple yarn-traverses staggered and so disposed as to form the selvagesf or portions at the ends ofthe packages ofsubstantially the same density as the intermediate portions of the mass.

Another object of the invention is to provide a machine for winding packages of the type indicated by alternately increasing and diminishing the length of stroke of .the yarn-'guide and thereby the length of traverse of the yarn while atthe same time progressively'reducing the minima and maxima traverses to build the ypackages with tapered ends.

Further objects of the invention areset forth in preferred form of construction of the winding machine, by way of example, as illustrated by the accompanying drawings. In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational View of a portion of a multi-.unit or gang winding machine showing two of the umts or winding heads and emnovel features ci therpresent invenbodyng .the

tion;

at the ends4 the following specication which describes a4 Fig. 2 is a plan view, partly in section, of the control means for regulating the length of traverse of the thread-guides of the winding machines;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged detailed view of a portion of the traverse-control mechanism, part-sectional on line 3 3 of Fig. l;

Fig. 4 isa'part-sectional view of a preferred type of package. which may be produced on the machine;

, Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic view indicating the variation inthe length of traverseof the yarn wound into thepackage as the length of stroke of the thread-guide is varied alternately from maximum to minimum and minimum to maximum again, with the maxima and minima of the traverses diminishing in extent progressively from start to finish of the winding operation;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged side view of a portion of one of the winding units showing the control cam for the traverse mechanism;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged elevational View of a portion of one of the winding units taken on line 'I-l of Fig. 6 looking in the direction indicated by the arrow;

Fig. 8 is a view of a portion of the threadguide traversing mechanism of` the machine showing the traverse-,frame back as removed to more clearly illustrate the former-cam or track for oscillating the thread-guide and indicating the positions of the guide at the ends of its maxout successive cycles but with the maxima and l vminima traverses progressively reduced in extent t'o build a package with tapered or frustoconical ends. By this method of winding an improved type of .package is produced to provide not ,only for its greaterstability and freer delivery of the yarn in unwinding it therefrom. butv also to produce a mass of yarn of substantially uniform density throughout. all of its portions. In the usual method of producing cross- .WOlHld packages. either of the drum-mund M* of its maximum and directions from end to end of the package, and

where the direction of traverse is reversed at each end of the package the return. bends or knuckles of the yarn overlie each other in regular order from the axial center tothe circumference of the package and thus tend to form denser portions of 'the mass, 'sometimes called hard selvages. These rmer and denser portions of the package therefore tend to resist penetration of the 4uid thereinto during a con A ditioning or dyeing treatment and consequently packages produced by this method of winding are not well suited for such treatment. Pack- ,l

ages of, rayon and other synthetic yarns are usually subjected to one or several conditioning and washing processes by causing the conditioning fluid to ow radially inward or out Y v 20 with its slack length reaching from end to end ward/through the' yarn mass, and satisfactory results cannot be secured unless the packages are of uniform density as there will be a tend-v ency for the fluid to penetrate more easily through the central portions of the package than through its end portions .which resist such penetration.. Likewise, luniform. or level dyeing of thevyarn is dimcult to obtain when cotton lor other textile materials are treated in package form and the packages-have denser portions at their ends.

Various attempts have been made to avoid dense ends or hard selvages in cops or packages intendedfor fluid treatment of the material therein, f or example, -by varying the rate of traverse of the yarn to space the coils farther of winding consists in traversing the yarn with A alternately increasing and A diminishing lengths of traverse while at the same time gradually reducing the maxima and--minima traverses to thereby eect a staggered arrangement of the return bends or "knucklespat the ends of the 'package so that they will not overlie one another 'I in regular sequence but will build up in everchanging order to produce a l substantially cylindrical mass with, tapered ends.

Referring to Fig. 1 of the present drawings,

the inventionfis herein illustrated as embodied in a multiple unit or gang-type machine, two

winding headsor units 2 being shown as mounted on horizontal tables or beds 3 supported from herein shown two gangs are arranged end-for-` end and coupled together to adapt them to be driven by a single motor indicated at M. EachV winding unit may comprise a box-like frame 5 mounting bearings for a horizontal winding spindle B and a .cam-shaft I arranged therev perforated tube, see Fig. 4, on which the package is wound. The winding spindles l of'the wholeseriesof heads or units 2 are shown as adapted to be driven from the motor M by means of an endless belt il `engaging the peripheries4 5 of drive-pulleys l2 which may be mounted fast on the spindles or connected therewith 'by suitable clutches asl usually provided in machines of the present time, but not herein shown. The belt I I passes around a driving pulley i3 on the motor-shaft I4 andthence leads under'idlerv pulleys I5 to vdirect it across the top of the drive- 4pulleys i2 on the spindle 6. Preferably a series of idler-pulleys i6 are iournaled on pivoted arms l1 to adapt them to be pressed against the belt Ii to' maintain it in contact with the pulleys i2 on the several spindles 6. An idlerpulley i8 is provided adjacent each winding unit or head 2 and the belt" Il extends continuously across the peripheries of the drive-pulleys i2 g5 each pulley may be raised thereabove to.release vthe belt from the related drive-pulley to arrest Y the operation of the winding unit driven thereby; Secured fast on a horizontal rod I8 rockably mounted in bearings at the top of theframe 5 so of the machine is an arm or lever Il having a cam-portion at'its end adapted to be moved across the end of the arm I'I to elevate the pulley IB, a handle 2l! on the forward end of the rReferring to Fig. 7, the cam-shaft 'l of each` unit carries a helical cam 2| fast thereon within V the frame or casing 5; the cam-shaft being driven from the winding spindle t by any suitable ar- 40 rangement of beltsor gears as usuallyv employed lin machines of the present type, but not herein shown. The cam 2i is formed with a helical groove engaged by a roller or bowl 22 on a rey ciprocable traverse-rod 23. The traverse-rod 22 is mounted to reciprocate in a guideway in a traverse-frame 25 which is pivotally supported on the cam-shaft v'l toadapt it to swing away from the winding spindle 6 during the growth of the winding' package. The traverse-frame 25 5 has a horizontal arm 26 formed with a longitudinal groove 24 in which the traverse-rod 23 slides and a substantially vertical arm 21. provided with a hub 28, see Figs. 1 and 7, mounted on the forwardly-projecting end ofthe camshaft 'l and held in place thereon by means of a disk or collar 29. The traverse-frame 25 is preferably made in two parts with a horizontal plateportion or traverse-frame back 32 fastened .to the horizontal arm 28 of the frame by screws 33.

the door by legs L Each bed may mount am d0 'I'he back 22 of the traverse-frame 25 is provided .desired number of units to form a gang, and as with a groove l5, see Fig. 6, overlying and cooperating with the groove 24 in the arm 26 to form a portion of the guideway and retain the traverse-rod therein.

Referring particularly to Figs. 6 to 9, inclusive,

the traverse-rod 23 carries an oscillating threadguide 40 at its outer end pivotally connected thereto by means as next described. Fastene'd to the end of the traverse-rod 23 is an arm or slide 4I, preferably formed from a flat strip of metal tremity of the arm 4 I is bent outwardly and rod l2 being operable manually to rock the lever I9.

f 32- and adapted to slide therealong. The threadguide 40 is carried by a mounting on the arm 4| prises a former-guide or cam-track 6 5', see Figs. 8 and 9, which is pivoted on a stud 66 screwed into .the traverse-frame back 32. The cam-track 6 5 is preferably-constructed from a strip of sheetin the form of i afbell-crank-lever-Aspivoted to....5, metaland formed with a longitudinal s101161 exthe arm by means of a stud 46.

` The upright arm of the bell-.crank lever 65 is formed into a loop to provide a cylindrical bear-l ing :i1 for a transverse pin 48 on which the thread-guide d is pivoted in the manner of a hinge-joint. The.threadguide 40 consists of an upright arm formed with a central slot 5 0 in its n upper portion'extending throughout the .greater part of its length and adapted for guiding the yarn or thread feeding therethrough to the package being wound. The upper extremity of the thread-guide 66 is preferably formed with a V-shaped re-entrant opening 5l leading into the slot 56 for facilitating the introduction of the yarn-strand into the slot. The lower portion'of the thread-guide lil is of bifurcatedform to proa vide a pair of cylindrical bearings.53 straddling the bearing 61 on the bell-crank lever 45 and adapted to receive the pivot-pin 48 whereby to ltingedly mount the guide on the bell-crank lever. The purpose of hingedly mounting the threadguide d0 in this manner is to provide for its rocking movement toward and away from the axis of the winding spindle when the machine is employed for winding packages of generally conical form known as cones For winding this type ofpackage the traverse-frame back has its forward bearing face disposed in angular relation or inclined to the axis of the winding spindle in conformity with the taper of the cone-tube on which the conical package is wound so that the threadguide will follow an inclined path as it reciprocates along the length of the package.

Mounted on the 'traverse-frame back 32 is va forked bracket 5d carrying a rotatable roller 55 arranged t0 bear against the periphery of'the cop-tube t at the commencement of the winding operation and to contact with the layers ofwinding distributed thereon; the contact-roller thus acting to swing the traverse-frame about the axis of the cam-shaft 1 as the winding package grows in diameter. The .traverse-frame 25 is provided with a depending arm 34, lsee Fig. 1,.hav ing its lower end weighted whereof to resist the swinging motion of the traverse-frame and maintain the contact roller 55 bearing against the surface of the winding at'all times. The bracket 54 may be mounted on the traverse-frame back 32 in any suitable manner and, as herein shown, it has a stud '51 at its center held in spaced bearings 58 on the rearward side of the :traverse-frame back, see Figs. 6 and 7. The bracket 54 is provided at its opposite ends'with forwardly-pro-l jecting arms 59 bored to provide bearings for the pintles 6u at the ends of the roller 55 whereby to mount the latter free to rotate `on thesurface of the Winding so as to eliminate friction during its contact therewith. Mounted on the bracket 54 is a sheet-metal guard or rest 62 having an arched top 83, seeFig. 6, across which the thread or yarn strand y draws as it feeds to the threadguide 40.

By means of the construction describedv above the thread-guide 'is mounted to rock laterally or oscillate in .the direction of its reciprocation with the bell-crank -pivoting on the'stud'd. As a result of this construction the strokeof the guide may be varied at different stages in'its reciprocation by and with the traverse-bar 23. The means for oscillating the thread-guide '40 com-` tending throughout its length and. substantially equal in extent to that of the maximum traverse to be imparted to the thread-guide d0. As shown by dotted lines in Fig. 7, the cam-track 65 reaches outwardly some distance beyond the outer end of the traverse-frame back 32 and an extension 68 is provided on the traverse-frame to cover and guard this end of the track. A bowl or roller l0 journaled on a stud. 69 at the end of the longer arm of the bell-crank lever 65 is arranged to engage the slot 61 in the cam-track to adapt ittoslide or roll .back and forth therealong.

The inner end of the cam-track 65 ycarries a l roller 1i journaled thereon in position to engage an inclined slot 12 in an elbow-shaped-arm 13, see

Figs. 6 and 7. At the start of a Winding operation the :cam-track or former-guide 65 assumes the inclined position indicated by dotted lines in Fig.

7. As the yarn is wound on the cop-tube t and the package increases in diameter the contact of the roller therewith will swing the"traverseframe 25 in clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 6, and during this receding action of the traverseframe the roller 1| on the former-guide 65 will slide down the incline of the slot 12. This coaction between the roller 1I and the inclined slot 12 will cause the former-guide or cam-track 65 to berocked on its pivot 66 to tilt its right-hand end' downwardly, as viewed -in Fig. '7, to change the angle of inclination of its track or slot 61.

This rocking ortilting action of the cam-track 65 will have the eiect to vary the oscillatory motion of the-thread-guide under' the inuence of the bell-crank lever 45, the tendency being .to' reduce the range of oscillation of the guide todiminish the extent of its throw o r traverse in the manner as explained more fully hereinafter.

In addition to this initial swinging -movement o f the former-guide or cam-track as caused by the recession of the traverse-frame with -respect to the axis of the winding spindle. a secondary swinging to-and-fro pivotal motion is imparted to the cam-track by shifting the slotted arm`13 horizontally toward the left, as viewed in Fig. 6

and indicated by dash lines in this view, and then back toward the right. To provide for this backand-forthshifting of the arm 1 3 it is mounted on a horizontal slidable rod or bar 15 actuated vby4 means as next described.

I'he slide-bar 15 preferably extends throughout the length of the gang-machine and carries an arm 13 for each winding unit or head mounted on the table or bed 3. As herein shown the bar 15 is supported by links or arms 16 depending from a horizontal tie-rod 11 which extends through'lugs 18 at the top of the frames 5. Referring to Fig. 1, the upper ends of the links 16 are pivoted or. studs 19 screwed into brackets 80 attachedto the tie-rod 11. The lower-ends of the links or arms 16 are pivoted on the enlarged ends of studs 8l,

see Fig. 3, which also serve to fasten the arms 13 to the slide-bar 15 by means of nuts 82 .screwed onto the outer ends of the studs against washers 83. The arms 1 3 preferably are constructedof sheet-metal formed with offset `portions at their lower 2end which are provided with slots for receiving thereduced ends of the studs Il I, see Fig.

6. By loosening the nuts 8 2 thearms 3 may be adjusted longitudinallyof the bar 15 within certain limits to regulatethe position of their caml chine.

slots 12 in relation to the traverse-control means of their respective winding heads. An inturued lip 00, see Fig. 3, at the bottom of each arm underlies the lower edge of the bar 10 and cooperates with a pair of lugs overlying the upper edge of the harto restrain the arm from rocking on the std`0l.

'I'he end of the slide-bar 10 is attached to a horizontal rod 00, see Figs.' 1 and 2, mounted to slide in bearings. projecting forwardly from a bracket 02 which depends from a plate 00 supported across the top oi' the two end winding units at the'adjacent ends of the gang-machines. The

with nuts 00 screwed up' against washers abut ting the sides of the bent portions. The slidable rod 00 is adapted to be reciprocated in its bearings 9| by a cam or eccentric |00 to impart a relatively slow reciprocaton to the slide-bars 10. lThe cam or eccentric |00 is mounted fast on the end of a shaft journaled in a horizontal bearing |02 forming a part of, or fastened to, the bracket 02.v The cam or eccentric |00 is arranged with its periphery adapted to engage a bowl or roller |00 Journaled on the end of a stud |00 clamped to a ilatted portion of the rod 00. A helical spring |01 coiled around the rod 00 is tensioned between one A of the bearings 0| and a collar |00 secured fast on the rod whereby it acts to maintain the roller |00 bearing against the periphery ofthe cam or eccentric |00. A second roller ||0 iournaled on the end of the stud |00 engages in a horizontal groove winding heads and consequently the belt will impart rotation to the pulley |00 to transmit the drive through the belt |00 to the pulley |00. Through this arrangement the pulley |00 is caused to drive through the worm |0| and wormwheel |00 to turn the shaft A|22 carrying the 'sprocket |2i. The sprocket |2| thus will drive through the chain |20 to rotate the sprocket ||0 and thereby the shaft which drives through the beveled pinion ||0 and gear |10 to rotate the shaft |0| to turn the cam or eccentric |00.- Through these connections the cam |00 is rotated to reciprocate the rod 00 and thereby the slide-bars 10 connected therewith at a relatively slow rate of motion.

The method of operation of the machine. is as next explained: As all the winding units are operated in the same manner the method of opera- .tion 'of one unit only will be explained herein.

.the operator adjusts the traverse-frame 25 to place the roller 50 against the periphery of'the cop-tube t, this adjustment being made by swinging' the traverse-frame counterclockwise about its pivot on the cam-shaft ,J

To start the winding operation the handle 20,

' see Fig. l, is rocked manually in clockwise direcoutwardly along the end of the arm |1.

||| in a guide-block |'|2 fastened to the bracket |02 to restrain the rod 00 from turning about its longitudinal axis.

The cam or eccentric |00 is caused to be rotated slowly by means of gearing connected with' the main drive of the machine. As shown in Figs. l and 2, a beveled gear ||0 is mounted fast on the rearward end of the shaft |0| and arranged in mesh with a pinion ||0 fast on the end of a stud-shaft journaled in a bearing ||0 supported from the bracket 02. Fast on the opposite end of the stud-shaft is a sprocketwheel ||0 which is connected by a chain |20 to avsprocket |2| on a lower horizontal shaft* |22,

see 1118.1.- The shan m is Journaled in a bearing |20 carried by a bracket |20 fastened 'to the leg 0 supporting the end cf the bed 0 of the ma- Referringto Fig. 2, the bracket |20 is clamped tothe webs of the ieg 0 and has a forklike 'extensionin which the bearing |20'is mounted by means of studs |20. 'The bearing |20 comprises a frame |20 carrying a hub |21 for receiving the end ofthe shaft |22 and embodying a casing |20 for enclosing a worm-wheel |00 fast on theend of, said shaft. The worm-wheel |00 meshes with a worm |0|, also enclosed 'in the.

casing |20,` and carried fast on a shaft |02 Journaled in` bearings in the casing. Fast on the` rearward end of the shaft |02 is a grooved beltpuliey |00 which is connected by kim endless belt |00 to a similar grooved pulley |00 fast with the idler-pulley l0, previously referred to. Itvhas tionto slide the cam at the end of the lever |0 'I'his will release the arm to allow it to be swung downwardly bythe spring 9, thereby causing the pulley |0 to press the belt against the drive-- pulley I2 to rotate the winding spindle 0. As before stated. the cam-shaft 1 is driven from the' spindle 0 by means of suitable gearing or other connections and thus the cam 2| will be rotatedto reciprocate the traverse-bar 20 to traverse the thread-guide 00.v With the traverse-frame 20 adjusted to the position shown in Fig. 6 and at the right in Fig.. 1, the contact roller 00 will bear against the periphery of the cop-tube t to cause the thread-guide 00 to recede from the axis of.

' the winding spindle 0 as the package builds up dash lines at the right of this view.

thereon. In Fig, 'I the cam-track or formerguide u is shown by dotted unes as in the inclined relationship which it may assume at the/ start of winding a package. The angularity of the former-guide 00 is controlled by the position of its roller 'Il in the cam-slot I2 ln the arm 10. see Fig. 6, and at the start of the winding the roller will be positioned adjacent the upper end of A the cam-slot to maintain the right-hand end of the former-guide elevated .or rocked upwardly. With this relationship of the parts the thread- Yguide 00 will be traversed with a maximum extent of throw from the position-shown' by full lines at the left of Fig. 7 tothat indicated by That is to say, as the slide 0| is moved toward the 'lett by the reciprocation'ot the traverse-bar 20 the roller or\bowl 'I0 on the bell-crank 00 will ride down the incline of the cam-slot 01 in the former-guide 00 to rock the guide 00 in counterelockwlse direction at this end of its-throw. On the other hand, asthe slide 0| 'is returned towards the' opposite end of its throw, that is,'toward the right i as viewed in Fig. '1, the roller 10 will ride up the incline of the cam-slot 61 to rock the bell-crank 45 and thereby the thread-guide 40 in clockwise direction. This action of the former-guide A65 on the thread-guide 40 is continued throughout l on the slide-bar 15 which is reciprocated horizontally under the action of the cam or'eccentric rotated from the main drive of thev machine through the gearing I l5, I I6, et cetera, previously described. The to-and-fro movement of the slidebar 15 is continuous and therefore as the position of the cam-arm 13 is varied the relation of its cam-slot 12 to the roller 1l on the end of the former-guide `titi will be altered continuously.`

Referring to Fig. 6, the cam-arm 13 is moved back and forth between the position shown by full lines in this view and that indicated by dash lines and during this slow reciprocatory motion of the arm its action on thev former-guide S will be to rock the latter about its pivot 66. In other words, the movement of the cam-arm 13 will impart a slight oscillation to the former-guide 65 by drawing its right-hand end downwardly and then swinging it upwardly with a relatively slow motion. As the right-hand end of the former-guide 65 is rocked downwardly the angularity or inclination of its cam-slot 61 will be reduced and this wil1.have the effect to give a lesser amplification of rocking movement to the thread-guide 40. Stated another way, the oscillating motion imparted to the thread-guide 40 will be gradually yreduced so that its range of traverse stroke will be progressively shortened. Onthe other hand, as the arm 13 is moved back toward the right'and the former-bar 65 rocked upwardly thereby at its right-hand end to increase theinclinat'ion of the cam-track 85 theeffect of the latter on the thread-guide will be to amplify its range of oscillation. Stated briey, the eiect `of the slow reciprocation of the camarm 13 is to diminish gradually the length of stroke of the thread-guide 40 and then to increase its length of stroke progressively, with this decrement and increment in the range of traverse stroke of the guide occurring continuously throughout the wholewinding operation.

As stated above, the rocking movement of the former-guide 65 about its pivot 66 under the action of the cam-arm v13 is continuous throughout the winding, and in addition the former-'guide is under a secondary control imposed upon it by the movement of the traverse-frame 25 outwardly away from the winding spindle 6 as the package grows in diameter. As the traverse-frame 25 swings outwardly the roller 1l on the end'of the former-guide 65 will be displaced downwardly in the cam-slot 12 in the arm 13, and under this 'control the former-guide will be caused to approach a substantially horizontal mean position, see Fig. 9. Consequently, as the reciprocating motion of the cam-'arm 13- continues to rock the former-guide 65 the oscillating effect of the latter on the thread-guide 40 will be reduced to gradually diminish the range of traverse of the threadguide as indicated in Fig. 9 and represented by the diagram of its traverses in Fig. 5. In this way the extreme limits of traverse of the threadguide will be set back or displaced inwardly along the axis of the package being wound.

, Referring to Fig. 5, it has been stated that the winding may start with a maximum traverse as the thread-guide 4o is osclnated with'its greatest range and the traverse of the guide will then be shortened to reach a. certain minimum, after which it is increased again to a maximum andso on in repeated cycles, but withthe maxima and minima. traverses and corresponding intervening traverses therebetween being gradually' -or return bends of the yarn at the ends of the package to prevent them from overlying one another and causing the end portions or selvages of the package, indicated by dash'lines in Fig. 4, to become hard and dense. Consequently, all portions` of the package will be of substantially uniform density to adapt it for fluid treatment in conditioning the material orin dyeing the yarn contained therein.

It will be observed from the foregoing specification that the present invention provides a simple yet ingenious mechanism for producing the desired result in winding packages of the character described, that is, with the coils or turns of winding so disposed as to build up a mass with tapered ends vand of uniform density throughout all of its parts. While the invention is herein illustrated and described as embodied in a preferred formof construction, it is to be understood that various modifications may be made in the structure and arrangement of the elements of the machine without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. Therefore, without limiting ourselves in this respect, we claim:

l. In a winding machine, a. rotary winding spindle, a reciprocable member, means for reciprocating said member, a. thread-guide reciprocated by said member, means for shifting the thread-guide relatively of the member to alternately increase and diminish the length of traverse stroke of the thread-guide from minimum to maximum and maximum to minimum respeccated by said member, means for shifting the thread-guide relatively of the member to alternately increase and diminish the length 0f traverse stroke of the thread-guide fromr.minimum to maximum and maximum tominimum respectively again during recurring cycles in the reciprocation thereof, and-means for controlling the last-named means to progressively shorten the maxima and minima traverse strokes of the thread-guide andthe strokes intervening therebetween during successive cycles throughout the winding of a package.

3. In a winding machine, a rotary winding spindle, a reciprocable member, means for reciprocating said member, a. thread-guide reciprocated by said member, means for shifting the thread-guide 'relatively of the member to alternately increase-,and diminish the length of the traverse stroke of the guide from minimum to maximum and maximum to minimum respectively again during a predetermined number of reciprocations thereof, and means actuated by the growth of the windingior controlling the last-named means to gradually shorten the maxima and minima lengths'oi the traverse stroke ofthe thread-guide progressively throughout the winding of a package.

4. In a winding machine, a rotary winding spindle, a reciprocable member, means for reciprocating said member, a thread-guide reciprocated by said member and adapted to traverse a yarn strand and reverse its direction of traverse at the end of each stroke, means for shifting the thread-guide relatively of the member to A alternately increase and diminish the length of the traverse stroke of the guide during recurring cycles in its reciprocation to stagger the reversals of the yarn strand in a direction axially of the package, and means for controlling the lastnamed means to gradually reduce the length of corresponding recurring strokes of the threadguide in successive cycles throughout the winding of a package. 5. In a winding machine, a rotary Windin spindle,`a reciprocable member, means for reciprocatlng said member, a thread-guide reciprocated by said member, means for moving the thread-guide relatively of the member to alternately increase and diminish the length of traverse stroke of the guide from minimum to maximum and maximum to minimum again to dispose the return bends oi' the yarn in zones located inwardly from the ends of the package, and means for controlling the last-namedmeans to of the thread-guide and the corresponding strokes intervening therebetween in successive cycles to form a package with tapered ends and uniform density throughout all of its parts.v

6. In a winding machine, a rotary winding spindle, a 4reciprocable member, means for recipthe cam-track in one direction in-addition to its rocking movement in opposite directions to progressively shorten the length of .corresponding traverse strokes of the thread-guide in successive cycles. v

9. I'n a winding machine, a rotary winding spindle, a reciprocable traverse-member, means for reciprocating said member, a thread-guide pivotally connected to said member, a rockable cam-track, means engaging said track and oper- -able on the thread-guide to oscillate the latter 30 reduce the maxima and minima traverse strokes about its' pivot, means to continuously rock the cam-track ilrst'in one direction and then in thev opposite direction to cause it to oscillate the thread-guide to alternately lengthen and shorten its traverse stroke during recurring cycles in the winding ot a package, and means for continuously displacing the cam-track in'one direction in addition to its rocking movement in oppositedirections to displace the points of reversal of the traverse stroke ot the thread-guide inwardly along the axis of the package to form the latter with frusta-conical ends. f

10. In-*a winding machine, a rotary winding spindle, a traverse-member reciprocable longitudinally .of said spindle, a thread-guide pivotally connected to said traverse-member to adapt it to oscillate with respect thereto, means for reciprocating said member, a rockable cam-track for oscillatingithe thread-guide continuously during its reciprocation by said member, means for rocking the cam-track ilrst in one direction and then in the opposite direction throughout a winding operation to alternately lengthen and shorten the rocating said member, a thread-guide rockably mounted on said member, means to rock the thread-guide on the reciprocable member to alternately lengthen and shorten its traverse -stroke during recurring cyclesin the reciproca- A member,` and means operated by the growth of the winding for controlling the shifting of the thread-guide Von the reciprocable member to cause it to reverse its maxima and minima traverse strokes at points disposed progressively inward along the axis of the 4package to build the latter with irusto-,conical'ends` f 8. In a winding machine, a rotary winding spindle, a member reciprocable opposite said spindle,v means for. reciprocating said member,

l, a` thread-guide pivotally mounted on said member to adapt it tb oscma with respectthereto.- means for reciprocating said member, a rockable cam-track for oscillating thev thread-guide continuously during its reciprocation by said memben means .for rocking thecam-track rst in one direction and then in the opposite direction throughout a winding operation to alternately: lengthen and shorten 'the traverse; stroke of the thread-guide at both ends of thepackage being wound, and means foi' continuously displacing traverse stroke of the thread-guide, and means operated by the growth of the winding for continuously displacing the cam-track in one direction in addition to its rocking-movement in opposite directions.

11. In a winding machine, a rotary winding spindle, a movable traverse-frame adapted to recede from the windingspindle as the package is vwound thereon, a traverse-member vmounted to reciprocate on the traverse frame, a threadguide pivotally connected to said member, a camtrack pivotally mounted on theftraverse-frame to adapt it to be swung into inclined relation to the path o! travel of the thread-guide, means engaging said cam-track for rocking the threadguide on the traverse-member during its reciprocation thereby. means for continuously swinging the cam-track in opposite directions on its pivot to cause itto rockthe thread-guide to alternately increase and diminish the length of its traverse stroke, and means operated by the movement' o! lthetraverse-frame during l the growth of the package for progressivelyA displacing the camtrack in one direction in addition to its rocking movement in opposite directions.

12. rn s winding machine, s mary winding spindle, a swinging traverse-frame, atraversercd. mounted to reciprocate on said frame, a thread-guide pivotaliymounted on said traverserod, cream-track rockably mounted on the traverse-frame, a follower carried by the cam-track, means engagingsaid track and operative on the thread-guideto oscillat'e the latter during the "areciprocation of the traverse-rod, a member having an inclined cam-portion for engaging the follower on the cam-track, and means for re.- ciprocating said member to continuously rock the cam-track during the reciprocation 01' the traverse-rod, said traverse-frame being caused to swing with respect to the member during the growth of the package to slide the follower on the cam-track along the inclined cam-portion ol the member, whereby to gradually displace the cam-track in addition to its rocking motion dur,-

l ing the winding of a package.

13. In a winding machine, a rotary winding spindle, a movable traverse-frame, a traverse-rod mountedvto reciprocate on said traverse-trame, a thread-guide pivotally connected to said trav" erse-rod, a cam-track rockably mounted on the traverse-frame, a follower carried by the camtrack, means engaging the cam-track and opera- 14. In a winding machine, a rotary winding -spindle, a swinging traverse-frame, a traversetive on the thread-guide to oscillate the latter about its pivot during the reciprocation thereof, a slide-bar mounted for reciprocation, a member carried by the slide-bar and having an inclined cam-portion for engaging the follower on 'the cam-track, and means operative in timed relation to the rotation of the spindle for reciprocating the slide-bar and member carried thereby to e rock the cam-track to alternately lengthen and shorten the traverse stroke oi the threadguide, said traverse-frame being movable with respect to the member during the growth oi the package to cause it to act on the follower on the cam'- track to progressively displace the latter in addition to its rocking motion during the of a package. i

winding rod mounted `to reciprocate on said transverseframe, a thread-guide pivotally supported by said traverse-rod. a cam-track rockably mounted on the traversefframe, means engaging said track `and operative on the thread-guide to oscillate the latter about its pivot 4during the reciprocation thereof, a slide-bar mounted for reciprocation, a member having an inclined slot therein for engaging the end of the cam-track, means for re-v ciprocating said member, and reduction gearing for driving said last-named means from the winding spindle to reciprocate the member, said reciprocation of the member acting to rock the cam-track to alternately lengthen and shorten the traverse stroke of the thread-guide, and said traverse-frame being swung with respect to the member during'the growth of the winding to displace the cam-track and progressively shorten corresponding recurring traverse strokes of thev thread-guide.

' ERNEST R. SWANSON.

CHARLES H. JONES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2634916 *Jul 5, 1949Apr 14, 1953Jr Walter P TaylorWinding
US3730448 *Mar 30, 1970May 1, 1973Barmag Barmer MaschfWinding machines with pivotable rail-guided toggle traversing rod guides
US3884426 *Oct 6, 1972May 20, 1975Schuster & Co F M NWinding and changeover device
US4498637 *Jul 19, 1982Feb 12, 1985Teijin Seiki Company, LimitedMethod of winding yarn on bobbin
US4555069 *Nov 1, 1982Nov 26, 1985Murata Kikai Kabushiki KaishaYarn winding apparatus and method
US4881694 *Sep 15, 1988Nov 21, 1989Barmag, AgYarn traversing apparatus for a winding machine
US4911370 *Dec 8, 1987Mar 27, 1990Barmag AgMethod and apparatus for winding yarn
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/478
International ClassificationB65H54/32
Cooperative ClassificationB65H54/325, B65H2701/31
European ClassificationB65H54/32B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 16, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: INTERNATIONAL DECISION SYSTEMS, INC., MINNESOTA
Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:THE GOVERNOR AND COMPANY OF THE BANK OF SCOTLAND;REEL/FRAME:019161/0463
Effective date: 20070412