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Publication numberUS2361154 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 24, 1944
Filing dateMay 5, 1944
Priority dateMay 5, 1944
Publication numberUS 2361154 A, US 2361154A, US-A-2361154, US2361154 A, US2361154A
InventorsSchoolfield Lucille D
Original AssigneeSchoolfield Lucille D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Educational device
US 2361154 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ocr. 24, 1944. L D, SCHOQLFIELP 2,361,154

EDUCATIONAL DEVICE oct 24, 1944v L. D. scHooLr-'iELD 2,361,154

` EDUCATIONAL DEVICE Filed May 5, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 1,10 JA 35 V090" 4/ al, valentine 44@ Patented Oct. 24, 1944 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE EDUCATIONAL DEVICE Lucille D. Schoolfield, Washington, D. C. Application May 5, 1944, Serial No. 534,296 7 claims. (c1. 35-35) The invention relates to a device for teaching spelling, reading and mastery of unfamiliar Words,

The main object of the invention is to provide semi-self teaching material for American and foreign-born children, when learning speech, and also lto read and to Write a basic vocabulary, which will teach them to read in the conventional direction. vtaught to read from left to right when the English language is `the subject.' lIt is often discovered thatpupils who are taught to read by methods now in common use in American schools, read backwards, that is, from right to left.l Such mishaps can not occur if my device is used for teaching.

Other objects of the invention are to teach:

(1) Recognition of initial consonants and consonant digraphs, vowels and diphthongs, in printed form, manuscript and cursive writing.

. (2) Sounds of letters.

(3) similarities and diierences in the formation of letters.

(4) Rudimentary spelling and word recognition.

(5) lNeatness and precision.

I achieve these objects by means of material described in the accompanying drawings and specification, in which like letters and numerals refer to the same or similar parts.

Fig. 1 represents a plan view of a comparativeli7 large, or master card A, one of a series of .master cards, having columnar arrangements I, 2 and 3, and pictorial representations 4, 5, 6, I and 8 portrayed in column I, in the names of Which representations initial sounds of certain consonants and consonant digraphs are emphasized. In columnz are depicted Voiceless oral consonants and consonant digraphs 9, I0, II, I2 and I3, the sounds of which correspond with initial sounds in the names of pictorial representations in column I. Column 3 adjoins column 2 at the right. In it blank spaces I4, I5, I6, IIand For example, the pupil is.

Fig. 4 represents an additional group of minor cards, 14a, I5a, Ilia, I'Ia and I8a, each displaying the name of a pictorial representation portrayed in column I, Fig. 1. For the purpose of brevity, said cards and others of similar character, will hereinafter be referred to as name cards. Overall sizes of cards described in Fig. 4

should match the inner outlines of spaces III, I5,

' I6, I1 and I8 in column 3, Fig. 1.

It should be noted that columns I, 2 and 3, Fig/1, areheaded, respectively, What is my name? It begins with and Find my name and match it below.

Procedure for teaching elementary students is as follows: y

(l) Place master card A, Fig. 1, before a pupil and pronounce the names of the pictorial representations in column I. Ask the pupil to repeat the names and continue the exercise until the pupil can identify and pronounce the name of each picture.

(2) Hand the pupil cards 4a, 5a, 6a, 'Ia and Ba, Fig. 2, and tell him to match the cards over corresponding pictures in column I. Make certain that margins of cards are placed in alignment with marginal lines of pictures. Enforced practice will develop a sense of neatness and prec1s1on.

(3) Pronounce the consonant symbols in column 2. Have the pupil repeat the sounds until each symbol can be recognised and pronounced.

(4) Hand the pupil cards 9a, Ia, IIa, I 2a and I3c, and tell him to match each over symbols in column 2 and, at the same time, to pronounce the sounds of the symbols.

(5) Hand` the pupil name-cards Illa, I 5a, I 6a, Ila and Ia. Tell-` him to examine the iirst two letters of each name and then place the card in the space in column 3, alongside the corresponding letter or letters in column 2.

(6) After the pupil has had sufficient practice to enable him to identify each card and place it in its correct position, master card A, Fig. 1, and symbol cards 9a, Ina, Ila, I 2a and Illa, Fig. 3, should be removed. The pupil should then be told to match name-cards I 4a, I5a, IBa, IIa and lila, Fig. 4, with pictorial representation cards 4a, 5a, 6a, 1a and 8a, Fig. 2. Continue the test until it has been sucessfully performed.

Fig. 5 represents card B, the second of the series of master cards having columnar arrangement la, 2a and 3a, similar in-layout to columns 2 and 3, Fig. 1. But whereas master card A, Fig. 1, and minor card groups in Figs. 2, 3 and 4, are shown separately, Fig. 5 portrays card B and fifteen minor cards of the same size as those depicted in Figs. 2, 3 and 4, in matched relation to material depicted upon it. Thus, in column la, pictorial representations I9, 20, 2|, 22 and 23 are covered by minor cards |9a, 2|l`a, 2|a, 22a and 23a, bearing similar representations. In column 2a, voiceless oral consonant symbols 24, 25, 26, 21 and 28 are covered by minor cards 24a, 25a, 26a, 21a and 28a, bearing similar symbols. In column 3a, blank spaces 29, 30, 3|, 32 and 33, are covered by name-cards 29a, 30a, 3|a, 32a and 33a.

Fig. 6 represents master card C, third of the series, having columnar arrangement |b,2b and 3b, similar in layout to columns I, v2 and 3, Fig. 1, and la, 2a and 3a, Fig. 5. Minor cards 34, 35, 36, 31 and 38 are shown in matched relation with similar pictorial representations beneath. In column 2b, cards 39, 40, 4|, 42 and 43, bearing voiced oral consonant symbols, cover like symbols. In column 3b, blank spaces 44, 45, 46, 41

and 48 are covered by name-cards 44a, 45a, 46a, 41a and 48a.

Fig. '1 represents the fourth master card D, of the series, having columnar arrangement similar to those in Figs. 1, 5 and 6. Minor cards 49, 50, 5|, 52 and 53 cover like representations in column Ic. Minor cards 54, 55, 56, 51 and 58, bearing additional voiced oral consonant symbols, cover similar symbols in column` 2c. In column 3c, name-cards 59,160, 6|, 62 and 63 cover blank spaces.

Fig. 8 represents master card E, 5th in the series, likewise having columnar arrangement similar to those in Figs. 1, 5, 6 and 7. In column Id, minor cards 64, 65, 66 and 61, bearing pictorial representations, are shown in matched relation with similar representations beneath. The lower section E8 is left blank because there is no suitable consonantsymbol to depict therein and because it is desirable to have all master cards of uniform size.

In column 2d, card 69, bearing one voiced oral consonant r; cards and 1| bearing voiced nasal consonants m and n, and card 12 bearing two letters q and u, cover similar symbols. When q and u are used jointly they commonly have the sound of kw as in queen, conquest, etc. In column 3, name-cards 13, 14, and 16 cover blank spaces.

Fig. 9 represents master card F, sixth of the series. It also has columnar arrangement similar to 'those of preceding master cards.

In column le, minor cards 11, 18, 19, 8G and 8| cover corresponding pictorial representations in the names of which sounds of certain vowels are emphasized. In column 2e, cards 82, 83, 84, 85 and 86, bearing vowel symbols, cover` similar symbols. In column 3e, name-cards 81, 88, 89, 90 and 9| cover blank spaces.

Master cards B, C, D, E and F, Figs. 5, 6, '1, 8 and 9, also bear the headings "What is my name? It begins with, and Find my name and match it below.

The method of teaching described on page 3, sections 1 to 6, inclusive, should be followed when teaching sounds of consonant and vowel symbols, rudimentary spelling and reading. and recognition of words, by means of indicia portrayed in Figs. 5, 6, '1, 8 and 9.

Whereas the specification and drawings refer to specific pictorial representations and corresponding names, the invention is by no means limited thereto. Any creatures, objects or things in Whose names the sounds of initial consonant and vowel symbols, listedl in the drawings, are emphasized, will suice if their relationship to the symbols is the same as those described herein.

For convenience, I have portrayed the invention as consisting of six master cards, with 18 groups of minor cards. Obviously, indicia shown on the six master cards could be depicted on one, two, or more cards. Nor is the order in which the material is arranged of vital importance. Pictorial representations and corresponding symbols can be transposed without impairing the method of teaching, provided, fundamental principles are adhered to.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. In an educational device, including lmeans for teaching students, speech, spelling, and also to read in the conventional direction, the combination of one or more master cards bearing on one side pictorial representations, in the names of which certain consonant and vowel sounds are emphasized, said master cards also portraying` consonant and vowel symbols the sounds of which are emphasized in the names of said pictorial representations, and a number of appropriately defined spaces of sufficient size to permit the names of said pictorial representations to be displayed therein; one or more groups of minor cards bearing on one side pictorial representations similar to those portrayed on said master cards; one or more groups of minor cards bearing consonant and vowel symbols corresponding to those portrayed on said master cards; one or more groups of minor cards displaying the names of said pictorial representations on said master cards; and all of said minor cards being of appropriate size and design so as to render them capable of being placed in matched relation with appropriate indicia portrayed on said master cards.

2. In an educational device, including means for teaching students, speech, spelling, and also to read in the conventional direction, the combination of one or more master cards, each havingA columnar arrangements in which are portrayed pictorial representations of creatures, or objects, in the names of which certain consonant and vowel symbols are emphasized; consonant and vowel symbols, emphasized inthe names of said representations, arranged in an appropriately defined adjoining column so that each symbol will be adjacent the representation to which it is related; a third column comprising a number of appropriately defined spaces of sufficient size to permit the names of said pictorial representations to be displayed therein; three series of minor cards, one series bearing pictorial representations similar to those portrayed on said master cards, another series portraying consonant and vowel symbols identical with those portrayed on said master cards, a third series displaying the names of all representations portrayed on said master cards; all of said minor cards being of appropriate size and design so as to render them capable of being placed in matched relation with appropriate indicia portrayed on said master cards.

3. In an educational device, the combination of a series of master cards having columnar arrangements, on one column of which are portrayed pictorial representations of creatures and objects in the names of which certain vowel and consonant symbols ar emphasized; consonant symbols emphasized in the names of said representations depicted in appropriate adjoining columns so that each symbol will be adjacent.

the representation to which it is related, allsymbols being arranged vertically in columns in accordance with their characteristics, that is, oral and nasal sounds, subdivided, respectively, into voiced and voiceless groups; vowel symbols emphasized in the names of said representations being also depicted in appropriate adjoining columns so that each symbol will be adjacent the representation to which it is related; a third set of columns comprising a number of appropriately dened spaces of suflicient size to permit the names of said pictorial representations to be displayed therein; three series of minor cards, one series of which bears pictorial representations similar to those portrayed on said master cards,

a second series depicting consonant and vowel symbols identical with those depicted on said master cards, a third series displaying names of all representations portrayed on said master cards; all of saidv minor cards being of appropriate size and design so as to render them capable of being placed in matched relation with appropriate indicia portrayed on saidl master cards.

4. In an educational device, including means for teaching students, speech, spelling, and also to read in the conventional direction, one or more master cards having columnar arrangements in which one or more pictures are portrayed in one column; symbols representing one or more sounds in the names of said pictures being depicted in an adjoining column; appropriately dened guide-lines for placement of related cards comprising a third column; one or more small minor cards bearing pictures identical with those portrayed on said master cards; one or more small minor cards bearing symbols f sounds identical With symbols depicted in-said second column; one or more larger mino-r cards each bearing the name of a picture `portrayed on a master card; and all of said minor cards being of appropriate size and design so as to render them capable of being placed in matched relation with appropriate indicia on said master cards.

5. In a semi-self teaching educational device,

including means for teaching students, speech, spelling, and also to read in the conventional direction, one or more master cards, each bearing one or more pictures, indicia constituting symbols representing one or more sounds in the names of said pictures, and one or more appropriately dened blank spaces in which cards, bearing one or more means of said pictures, can be portrayed; one or more minor cards, substantially smaller than said master cards, bearing one or more pictures similar to pictures on one ormore of said master cards; one or more minor cards, of substantially the same size as said first mentioned minor cards, bearing indicia constituting symbols representing one or more sounds in the names of said pictures, said symbols being similar to one or more symbols on said master cards; one or more minor cards, having length, approximately equal to the combined length of 'a minor picture card plus a minor symbol card, but having substantially the same width, bearing one or more names of said pictures; and all of said minor cards being of appropriate size and design so as to render them capable of being placed in matched relation with appropriate indicia portrayed on said master cards.

6. In an educational device, including means for teaching pupils, speech, spelling, and also to read in the conventional direction, the combination of one or more comparatively large, or master cards having columnar arrangements, in one marginal column of which are portrayed certain indicia headings and one or more representations in the names of which representations certain symbols ofsounds are emphasized; certain indicia headings and symbols of said sounds emphasized in the names of said representations depicted in appropriate adjoining columns so that each symbol will be adjacent the representation to which it is related; certain indicia headings and a number of spaces, appropriately defined, in an adjoining marginal column of sufficient size to permit the names of said representations to be displayed therein; three series of substantially smaller, or minor cards, one series bearing representations similar to those portrayed on said mast-er cards; a second series of minor cards portraying symbols of sounds identical with those portrayed en said master cards; a third series .of minor cards displaying the names of all representations portrayed on said master carols; all of said minor cards being of appropriate size and design as to render them capable of being placed in matched relation with appropriate indicia portrayed on said master cards; the Whole being arranged to teach pupils to` read English in the conventional direction, namely, from left to right.

'7. In an educational device, including means for teaching pupils, speech, spelling, and also to read in the conventional direction, the combination of one or more comparatively large, or master cards having three columnar arrangements, in the left marginal column of which are portrayed certain heading indicia and one or more pictorial representations in the names of which certain sounds are emphasized; said master cards also portraying in the middle column certain heading indicia and, also, letters of the English alphabet having common characteristics, the sounds of which are emphasized inthe names of said representations; a third, or right, marginal column portrayed en said master cards in 'which heading indicia and a number of blank spaces, appropriately dened, of sufficient size to permit the names of said representations to be displayed therein; three series of substantially smaller, or minor cards, one series of which bears representations similar to those portrayed on said master cards; a second series of minor cards depicting letters of the alphabet, identical with those depicted in the middle columns of said master cards; a third series of minor cards displaying the names of representations portrayed on said master cards; all of said minor cards being of appropriate size and design as to render them capable of being` placed in matched relation with appropriate in- Gioia portrayed on said master cards; the whole' being arranged to teach pupils to read English in the conventional direction, namely, from left to right.

LUC-ILLE D. SCHOOLFIELD.

Referenced by
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US2482227 *Nov 20, 1944Sep 20, 1949Towne BenjaminEducational game
US2628435 *Aug 13, 1949Feb 17, 1953Minninger Evelyn SEducational device
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Classifications
U.S. Classification434/167
International ClassificationG09B17/00
Cooperative ClassificationG09B17/00
European ClassificationG09B17/00