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Publication numberUS2362497 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 14, 1944
Filing dateOct 29, 1943
Priority dateOct 29, 1943
Publication numberUS 2362497 A, US 2362497A, US-A-2362497, US2362497 A, US2362497A
InventorsWilliam D Moore
Original AssigneeWilliam D Moore
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Metal arch support
US 2362497 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 14, 1944. w, MOORE 2,362,497

METAL ARCH SUPPORT Filed 001;. 29, 1943 Patented Nov. 14, 1944 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE METAILQARGH SUPPORT William Di Moore, Portsmouth, Oliio Application-October 29, 1943; Serial-No". s-oaoss (oi. sis-r7).

This invention relates to arch" supports-for shoes and is particularly concerned with an bridge or shank formed from metal or' the like or'a particular configuration for supporting portions'of the foot in shoes of the corrective type.

The use of arch supporting shank member's formed from a rigid material such as steel or the like is very conventional in shoe" construc tion, particularly in Womens shoes; different types of shanks have been provided for the asserted purpose of correcting one or more of the various elements to which thehumar'i' foot is subjected when its normal positionis altered by the use of high heels. Many of these shanks are of the corrective .type; that is, they are intended to cure or alleviate ailments resulting from the previous use of impropershoes. In this class there are shanks which are of exceedingly complicated construction .making them heavy, cumbersome, and diflicult to incorporate in the shoe. There are other types which: comprise little more than a'longitudinal rib which lends rigidity to the arch portion of the shoe but does not perform any appreciable function in supporting those portions of the feet which in high heeled shoes require support One of the objects of the present invention has been to provide a shank which, in addition to supplying general rigidity and support to the arch portion of the shoe, also'performs the particular function of supporting those portions of the foot which scientific tests have determined require support, to Wit, the scaphoid bone on the 7 inside of the foot and the fifth metatarsal head on the outside.

Another object has been to provide a shank which supports the foot naturally as it would be supported if the person were walking barefoot rather than one which attempts to correct foot ailments resulting from the wear of improper shoes. Another object has been the provision of a shank which is particularly adapted for use with a welt shoe and one which can be readily incorporated and maintained in this type of shoe.

Another object has beento provide a shank bodiment of the invention disclosed alsoin the drawing in which: Figure l is a bottom p1an view of the of the invention positioned onthe outer side" of the insole of a welt type shoe. I

Figure 2 is a top plan View of the insole or a similar type of shoe showing the general rela' tibn'sllilj between the Shank piece and the" insole.

Figure 3 isa sectional view along the line 3 -3, Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a* sectional view along the line 4 4 Figure l.

The shank piece of the invention-is indicated generally at Ill; Figure 1". As shown, it is positioned-on the outer or lower side of an insole If of a welt type shoe; The front end of the shank is somewhat wider than the middle or rearportionssothat its side edges can be placed directly against the inner sides of the inseam's'. This front end projects forwardgenerall'y under the forepart of the foot, while the rear portion extends back tocover generally the heel-portion or the shoe; An important feature" or theshahk is the wing" extensions [2 and" I3, the former errtending inwardly and across the inseam lip H I and welt I'Bfor the support of the scaphoid bone; The extension I3; disposed forwardly of theextension" l2 extends outwardly also across' the in-- eam as for the support of the fifth metatarsal head. In thisway'th'e'fo'ot is maintained ingenerally balanced position and a rigid support is provided for the particular portions which require support. As shown in Figures 3 and 4, the extensions are substantially flat although the shank itself is bent or curved longitudinally to coincide generally with the arch of the instep. The extensions are on a slightly lower plane than thebody of the shank as shown also in Figures 3 and 4. This enables them to rest on top of the inseam along the portion where the inseam is crossed and permits the formation of the welt l5 without difliculty.

The shank piece may be secured in position at its forward end by fastening means inserted through the openings [6 and at its rearward end through the opening ll. An aperture I8 is prohaving the requisite supporting characteristics but one which is of comparatively simple construction and sufficiently light in weight to be completely unobtrusive when positioned in the completed shoe.

Other and further objects and advantages will be apparent from the consideration of a further end more detailed description of a preferred emvided at the extreme rearward end for heel attachment. Longitudinal reenforcing ribs l9 may be provided and these tend to increase the general strength and rigidity of the shank.

A particularly advantageous feature of the construction resides in the snug and unobtrusive way in which its contours coincide with the under surface of the insole of an ordinary welt shoe. The forward end and middle of the shank are configurated so that they will coincide generally with the inner line of the inseam. The extensions extend over the inseam but without interfering with the welt. The rear portion of the shank is disposed generally over the heel portion. Because of this configuration there is such a close fit between the shank and insole that in addition to the other advantages it is possible to dispense with the forward attaching elements whichin ordinary constructions tend at times to work loose and to cause an obstruction in the shoe.

In the sectional views 3 and 4 the upper is indicated generally at 20 and the upper surface of the insole at 2 l. Wing extensions 22 and 23 may be provided on the insole coinciding generally with the wing extensions on the shank. As will be noted in these views, the configuration of the shank does not interfere in any way with the formation of the welt and attachment of the outsole.

From the above it will be noted that I have provided a shank support which is peculiarly aadpted to support those portions of the foot requiring support in a high-heeled shoe and one which can readily be incorporated in a welt type shoe. At the same time the structure when made of a light but strong metal does not add appreciable weight to the shoe and is completely unobtrusive in the finished construction.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A shank support formed of metal or the like for a welt type shoe comprising a flat strip member adapted to be disposed between the insole and outsole and extending generally from the heel to the forepart of the shoe, a wing extension on the inner side of said member toward the rear. thereof for supporting the scaphoid bone and a second wing extension on the outer side toward the front for supporting the fifth metatarsal;

head.

2. An arch bridge for a welt type shoe comprising an unitary strip of metal or the like disposed between the insole and outsole and extending from the heel forward to the metatarsal 2" region, a wing extension on the inner side of the strip toward the rear thereof fo supporting the scaphoid bone and a second wing extension on the outer side toward the front for supporting the fiith metatarsal head, said extensions being in a plane below that of the body of the strip and extending outwardly of the inseam.

3. In a welt type shoe a shank iron disposed between the insole and outsole, said shank iron comprising an unitary strip element extending from the heel forward to the metatarsal region, the body of the strip being disposed in the space between the inseams, a wing extension on the inner side of the strip toward the rear thereof for supporting the scaphoid bone and a second wing extension on the outer side toward the front for supporting the fifth metatarsal head, said extensions being in a plane below that of the body of the strip and being seated on the inseam.

4. In a welt type shoe, a shank support comprising an unitary element formed from metal or the like and disposed between the insole and the outsole, said support extending from the heel to the forepart of the shoe and being curved longitudinally to coincide with the lower surface of the shoe, the body of the support being disposed in the space between the inseams, a wing extension on the inner side of the support toward the rear thereof and a second wing extension on theouter side toward the front, said extensions being in a planebelow that of the body of the support and extending outwardly beyond the inseams and wing extensions on the insole coinciding with the extensions on the shank.

5. A shank support formed of metal or the like for a welt type shoe comprising a substantially fiat strip member adapted to be disposed between the insole and outsole and extending generally from the heel t the forepart of the shoe, said member being curved longitudinally to coincide with the contour of the foot, the forepart of the body portion being wider than the central or rear parts adapting the side edges of said forepart to 40 be disposed adjacent the inner edges of the inseams, a wing extension on the inner side of the strip toward the rear thereof for supporting the scaphoid bone and a second wing extension on the outer side toward the front for supporting the 45 fifth metatarsal head, said extensions being in a plane below that of the body of the strip and being adapted to rest on the inseams and to extend outwardly therefrom.

5o WILLIAM D. MOORE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2585588 *Sep 28, 1951Feb 12, 1952Selby Shoe CompanyShoe shank
US3313048 *Apr 14, 1964Apr 11, 1967Mid States Shoe CoCushion shoe
US4783910 *Jun 30, 1986Nov 15, 1988Boys Ii Jack ACasual shoe
US4794707 *Jun 30, 1987Jan 3, 1989Converse Inc.Shoe with internal dynamic rocker element
US5720117 *Dec 3, 1996Feb 24, 1998Ariat International, Inc.Advanced torque stability shoe shank
US8584378 *Aug 17, 2010Nov 19, 2013Adidas AgOutsole and sports shoe
US20110197475 *Aug 17, 2010Aug 18, 2011Adidas Ag World Of SportsOutsole And Sports Shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/17.00R, 36/76.00R
International ClassificationA43B23/22
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/142, A43B23/22
European ClassificationA43B7/14A20A, A43B23/22