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Publication numberUS2363785 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1944
Filing dateAug 17, 1943
Priority dateAug 17, 1943
Publication numberUS 2363785 A, US 2363785A, US-A-2363785, US2363785 A, US2363785A
InventorsSam Gold
Original AssigneeEinson Freeman Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Motive power for toys and the like
US 2363785 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 28, 19;. 'GOLDV 2,363,785

' MOTIVE POWER FOR TOYS AND THE LIKE Filed Aug. 17, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR 3 Sara, 00%

Ba 2 ATTORNEY? NOV. 28, 1944. s GOLD I MOTIVE POWER FOR TOYS AND THE LIKE Filed Aug. 17, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR Sam Gold A ORNIEY Patented Nov. 28, 1944 UNITED s s PATENT; OFFICE.-

MO'TIVE POWER FOR TOYS AND THE Sam Gold, Chicago, 111., assignor to Einson-Freeman 00., Inc., Long Island City, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware Application August 17, 1943, Serial No. 498,921 1 (o1. 46-1) 2 Claims.

My present invention relates generally to spring motors, and has particular reference to a spring device of non-metallic character adapted to afford motive power for toys. I

Itis a general object of my invention to provide a simplified device which will function as a compression spring and which iscomposed of inexpensive non-metallic sheet materials such as ordinary cardboard or the like. As in the case of any ordinary type of spring, the present device may be adjusted into astressed condition in whicha certain amount of energy is stored, this energy being available as motive power for acti-.

vating various toys and parts thereof.

In a sense, myinvention has primary reference to toys assuch, in that it affords asimple and inexpensive mechanism for storing and re leasing small quantities of energy to be used in operating the toy, but certain phases of my in vention are of wider scope and may find applicability in educational devices, amusement devices,

and small mechanical devices generally.

The-present instrumentconsists essentially of a springy body which if formed of a length of cardboard or equivalent material folded back and forth upon itself into a series of hingedly con nected sections arranged in zig-zag relationship,

, the material used having sufiicient inherent resilience to urge thebody into a normal relatively expanded condition. This provides a structure in which compression of the sections into a more closely packed group will store up a small amount of motive energy which may be released for any useful purpose when the pressure is relieved.

In adapting this spring motor to a toy or similar device,it is associated with an abutment wall against which one end portion of the'body may rest, thus permitting the body to be stressed by compressing it into the direction of said wall.

This may be accomplished in any desired manner, depending upon the nature of thetoy or other device with which the motor is associated, but I prefer to accomplish thestressing of the body by means of apulling force applied to a tension member which extends lengthwise of the body. I

find the most useful form of the motor to be one in which the various sections are provided with aligned medial apertures to permit a tension member to extend through said apertures into Figure 1 is a plan the form of an end wall of an elongated chamber within which the spring is snugly accommodated, since this serves not only to shield and protect the spring, but also to prevent undesired lateral buckling when the spring is stressed. Moreover, when the device is used with toys or the.

like, a complete concealment of the spring is desirable becauseof the mystifying effect which is produced by the ability to store up and release energy in the absence of an ordinary motor,'

metal spring, or other usual source of power.

To illustrate the general nature of the invention and its various capabilities and features, I have chosen to illustrate it herein in association with several typical toys. Thus, I-achieve the foregoingobjects, and such other objects as may hereinafter appear or be pointed out, in the manner illustratively exemplified in the accompanying drawings, in which:

view of astrip of sheet material, such as cardboard of which the device may be formed;

Figure 2 is a fragmentary perspective view of an end portion of the spring;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary plan view showing one manner in which a tension member may be associated with an endportion of the spring;

Figure i is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of the present ldevice snugly, accommodated" within an elongatedchamber of the type which is preferably used;

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 4 showing the manner in which the body may be stressed to store up energy;

Figure 6 is a perspective view of a simple wheeled toy, with parts broken awayto reveal the interior, showing one illustrative use to which the invention may be put;

through a cannon type of toy, showing another Figure '7 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view manner in which the device may be used;

Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 7 showing the spring or motor instressed condition;

Figure 9 is a fragmentary perspective View of a portion of the spring device illustratedin Figures 7 and 8; and

Figure 10 is a perspective view modification.

, material.

be borne in mind that this strip may have a width of a further .plish this purpose.

of approximately one inch or so, and may be one or two feet in length, possibly more. I

In carrying out my invention, the strip is folded back and forth upon itself along transverse parallel equally-spaced lines 2| to form a series of hingedly connected substantially square sections 22, as shown in Figure 2, arranged in zigzag relationship. The material employed must be sufficiently. flexible to permit this folding to be readily accomplished, yet sufl'iciently rigid to permit the individual sections to remain intact; and there must also be an adequate inherent resilience to urge the body into a normal relatively expanded condition and to resist compression of the sections into a more closely packed group.

In the preferred embodiment of the invention,

the sections 22 are provided with aligned medial apertures 23 adapted to permit a tension member 24, such as a string or the like, to be threaded through them as indicated most clearly in Figure 3. If desired, one of the end sections may be provided with two apertures 25, as indicated inFigure 2, to facilitate the attachment of the tension member 24 to the end section, although obviously any other expedient maybe employed to accom- For example, by threading the string 24 through a single aperture,- and forming a relatively large-size knot,the same result can be achieved. 1

This body is preferably snugly accommodated within an elongated chamber 26 as shown in Fig ures 4 and 5. The structural details of this chamber have not been illustrated, but in the case of a toy it is contemplated that this chamber, as well as the other elements of the toy, might be composed of ordinary sheet cardboard or the like. The chamber 26 is provided with at least one end wall 2'! against which one .end portion of the spring body is adapted to rest. A useful and workmanlike result may be achieved by providing an aperture in the end wall 27 to permit the passage through it of the tension member 24. Thus, by exerting .a pulling force upon the member 24, a indicated by the arrow in Figure. 5, the body within the chamber 26 may be compressed into a stressed Condition, this storing up of a small amount of potential energy being capable of accomplishment from the exterior of the chamber. When the strin 24 is released,,the spring within the chamber releases its stored up energy in returning, due to its inherent resilience, to the normal relatively expanded condition shown in Figure 4, and this energy may be used for any desired purpose by transmittalthrough the tension member .24, or in other ways hereinafter to be alluded to.

In Figure 6 I have illustrated a simple wheeled toy 28 to show how the present motive power may be harnessed to a useful purpose. The structural details of the toy have not been shown, and it will be understood that any desired super-structure may be pro-vided for depending upon'the wheeled vehicle which the toy is intended to simulate. It is contemplated that the entire toy, with the possible exception of the axle or axles, will be composed of inexpensive sheet material'such as cardboard or the like. i

In Figure 6, the spring 29' is snugly accommodated within an elongated chamber forming the longitudinal half of a prismatic body with which axles 30 and 3! are associated, each axle carrying one or more wheels 32. In the end wall 33 there is an aperture 34 through which the string or equivalent tension member 35 extends, it being understood that this tension -member extends body in the illustrative manner hereinbefore de-' scribed in connection with Figures 4 and 5. When the spring has been compressed to maximum amount, a release of the axle 30 will permit the stored up energy to be transmitted in reverse direction through the tension member 35, as a result, of which the axle 30 will be rotated by means of the motor. a

While a single motor may be all that is needed or desired to accomplish this general object, I have found it preferable to provide two such motors arranged side byside. The other one is not shown in Figure 6, but is snugly accommodated within an elongated chamber forming the other longitudinal half of; the prismatic structure shown in Figure 6, and. where two such spring motors are used in this manner, it is preferable to associate the second tension member with the axle 3|. A wheeled toyis thus provided which may be manually pushed along the floor for-a short distance to tension the springs, and when this has been accomplished, a release of the toy will result in having it move along the floor in the opposite direction,,under the action of the accommodated motive power.

In Figures 7, 8,, and 9 I have illustrated another type of toy with which the present spring may be employed. The springy body 31 is snugly accommodated within a chamber 38 which has an end wall 39 against. which one end-portion of the body rests. A tension member 40 extends longitudinally through a series of aligned medial apertures in the sections of the body 31, and out through an aperture in the wall 39. A knot 4| is preferably formed in this member to press against the outer surface of the end wall 39 and thus limit the expansion of the accommodated motor to a predetermined amount. At theremote end of the body 31, the tension member 40 engages with the end portion of the body 37, and

also with a rod which may be composed of wood or the like. This rod projects into a tube or barrel 43 which may be caused to simulate the barrel of a gun or the like.

The balance of the toy, and the structural details, have not been illustrated in either of Figures '7 or 8, but I have indicated at 44 how various supporting walls may be employed to hold the parts in fixed relationship, it being understood that these walls form part of an exterior structure which simulates the gun mount or other parts and accessories.

It is contemplated that the device may be used by inserting asuitable projectile into the open end of the gun barrel 43, and by pulling .rearwardly upon the tension member 40, as indicated in Figure 8. This results in compressing the springbody against the rear wall 39 of the chamber 38, and in withdrawing the rod 42 into'the rearward position shown in Figure 8. When the accomplished in any desired manner, and Ihave illustratively shown a preferred assemblyof parts in Figure 9. It will be observed that the four end sections 45, 46, 41, and 48 of the strip of cardboard or equivalent material of which the spring is made are folded so as to form a boxlike structure, the sections 46 and 48 being providedwithapertures 49 and 50 adapted to align with the main set of aligned apertures 5| formed in the zig-zag sections 52 of the spring. The rod 42is inserted through the aperture 49, the end of the string 40 is threaded through the aperture 155 and then tied or otherwise secured to the rod 42, and thereafter the rod 42 is pushed through a the aperture 50 and the adjacent aperture 51.1 This holds the tension'member 4D in engagement with this end portion of the spring body, and

also serves to tie the rod 42 to the spring.

It will be observed that the motive power in Figures 7, 8, and 9 is permitted to manifest itself by a pressure which is exerted not through the tension member 40 but by a pressure upon a projectile or similar member. the operation of the spring body in Figures '7 and 8 is different from the operation of the .corresponding spring body in Figure 6, and this serves to illustrate two different possibilities of use of the motor. a I a In Figure 10 I have illustrated a slightlymodifled device, in which two spring bodies 53 and 54 are arranged in tandem relationship, a ten- In this respect,

In generaLit will be understood that the details herein describedand illustrated for the purpose of explaining the general nature ofthe invention may obviously be modified by those skilled in the art without departing from/the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims. l

Havingthus described my invention and illustrated its use, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A device adapted to afford motive power for toys, comprising a springy body formed of a length of cardboard folded back and forth upon itself into a. series of hingedly connected substan-1 tially rectangular sections arranged in zig-zag relationship, the cardboard having sufficient inherent resilience to urge said body into a normal relatively expanded condition whereby compression of the sections into a more closely packed group Will store up motive energy which isre leased when the pressure is relieved, said sections being provided with aligned medial apertures, an elongated fixed chamber snugly accommodating said body along the folded sides thereof and guiding and supporting said body against lateral displacement relative to the folds, said chamber sion member 55 extending through a series of aligned apertures 56 in the body, 54 and also through a set of similar aligned apertures 51 in the body 53. At the remote end of the body 53, four sections 58 are folded to define a box-like structure, and the end of thelstring 55 is secured to this structure in any desired manner. When this composite motor is accommodated within an open-end elongated chamber, such as the chamber 38 shown in Figures 7 and 8; it is possible for this chamber itself to serve as the expelling medium for a projectile or the like. In such'an event, the use of a rod 42 is notnecessary, and

the box-like structure at the remote end of the ,spring body serves as the medium for exerting pressure upon a small ball or similar projectile which may be propelled by the tension spring.

In general, it will thus be obvious that the present spring body is of relatively wide utility and may be used wherever an ordinary compression spring has heretofore been employed. The present motor. may be used to exert either a pulling effect or a pressing effect, depending entirely upon the nature and purpose of the toy,

or other mechanical instrument with which it is associated. f

Among the outstanding features of thepresent device are its extreme simplicity, its inexpensive character, and the fact that all these desirable results and advantages may be achieved without requiring the use of metalor other resilient material of currently more expensive and less available character.

otherend extending through'saidapertured end 'wall and through said apertures into engagement axle, comprising a springy body formed of a length. of cardboard folded back and forth upon itself into a series of hingedly connected sections arranged in zig'-zag relationship, the cardboard having sufficient inherent resilience to urge said. body into a normal relatively expanded condition wherebycompression of the sections into a more closely pa'ckedgroup will store up motive energy which is released when the pressure is relieved, said sections being provided with aligned medial apertures, an elongated fixed chamber snugly accommodating said body along the folded sides thereof and guiding and supporting said body against lateral displacement relative to the folds, said chamber being provided with an apertured end wall, and a tension member having one end wound on said axle and fixed thereto and the with the remote end pOrtion of said body, whereby rotation of the axle will exert a pulling force upon said member to compress the body toward,

said end wall of the chamber, and whereby motive power may thereupon be transmitted through said member in the reverse dirction when the axle is released.

SAM GOLD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2917340 *May 21, 1957Dec 15, 1959American Felt CompanyGlass channel run
US3086632 *Oct 10, 1961Apr 23, 1963Borg WarnerOne-way roller clutch
US3166169 *Dec 22, 1961Jan 19, 1965Borg WarnerOne-way roller clutch with plural cage means
US4608027 *Jun 6, 1983Aug 26, 1986Klamer R BSoft propellable toy
US5433549 *Sep 7, 1993Jul 18, 1995Thomas H. McGaffiganFlexible tie strut
US5667326 *Sep 6, 1994Sep 16, 1997Mcgaffigan; Thomas H.Flexible tie strut
WO1995007416A1 *Sep 6, 1994Mar 16, 1995Thomas H McgaffiganFlexible tie strut
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/486, 267/164, 185/37
International ClassificationA63H29/02, A63H29/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H29/02
European ClassificationA63H29/02