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Publication numberUS2364452 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 5, 1944
Filing dateJul 17, 1943
Priority dateJul 17, 1943
Publication numberUS 2364452 A, US 2364452A, US-A-2364452, US2364452 A, US2364452A
InventorsKramer Ferdinand
Original AssigneeAllied Purchasing Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knockdown easy chair
US 2364452 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 5, 1944. F. KRAMER KNOCK-DOWN EASY CHAIR Filed Jul 17, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR $5 Y Why/M7450 [CM/Vii? W w ATTORNEYS I Dec. 5, .1944.

F. KRAMER 2,364,452

KNOCK-DOWN EASY CHAIR Filed July 17, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR gmmm flee/m? ATTORNEYS Patented, Dec. 5, 1944 KNOCKDOWN EASY mm Ferdinand Kramer, PortChester, N. Y., assignor to Allied Purchasing Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York, Fred V. Gerstel, New York, N. Y., Paul M. Mazur, New

York, N. Y., and himself Application July 17, 1943, Serial No. 495,105

Claims.

The invention relates to an article of furniture, and more particularly to an easy chair of a construction making it possible to dismantle suchchair into a substantially complete knockdown condition so that the component parts thereof may be packed in a relatively small space for transportation or storage. Such knockdown easy chair is also so constructed that after it has been assembled, the inclination of the back rest may be adjusted.

A particular object of the invention is' to provide such knock-down adjustable easy chair in the assembly or disassembly of which no special skill or tools of any kind are required. The novel construction of my chair is of an all wood construction having a small number of parts which are detachably secured together in the assembled condition of the chair, and yet provides a structure in which there is a rigid and durable connection between all component parts without any possibility of loosening of joints in the ordinary use to which such a chair is conventionally put.

My novel knock-down adjustable easy chair may also be produced in large quantities in accordance with modern mass production methods, the component parts being of simple design and readily interchanged, as they do not involve precision tooling, precision measurements, or other manufacturing-cost raising factors.

In its broadest aspects, my novel knock-down adjustable easy chair comprises a pair of vertically disposed supports of angular shape, the two vertical sections of each of such supports constituting the legs of the chair and the central horizontal sections constituting the side arms of the chair. These two supports are connected by suitable cross-pieces, and the seat and reclining back-rest portion of the chair is disposed between the two supports upon a pair of guide rails extending between the front and rear leg sections of the supports.

Particular features of novel construction are incorporated in the two connecting members extending between the supports and so connected to the rail members and to the supports as to insure a ready and easy attachment of the component parts of the chair and yet produce an extremely rigid and durable structure when the chair has once been assembled.

A particular embodiment of my invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a perspective view of an adjustable justed to various angular positions; and

Fig. 5 is a plan view showing the component parts of the chair placed within the small space necessary for securel wrapping and packing the same for transportation or storage.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, in which similar reference characters identify similar parts in the several views, Ill and H are respectively the right and left hand supports preferably formed of strips of lumber, one section l2 of which constitutes the rear leg, the other section I3, the front leg, and the horizontal intermediate section 14, constitutes the arm-rest of the chair. The sections 12 and i3 forming the legs of the chair, are connected to the central arm-rest M in any suitable manner, for instance, by the glued half-lap joints l5. The sections [2 I3 and [4 maybe constructed of comparatively narrow strips of wood Or plywood of suitable thickness or even of composition material.

In the assembling of the chair, the two rear leg sections l2 are joined together by a rear back-rest rail member l6 which may be formed of a strip of wood having a chamfered surface I! extending along its top front edge. The back-rest rail 16 is connected to the back legs l2 by means of a pair of dowels l8, one at each end of the back-rest rail, said dowels extending through correspondingl provided apertures in the back leg members l2. The dowels It are of the half-split type.

Besides the back-rest rail [6, rigid connection of the two back leg members I2 is obtained by I the cross supporting rail l9 which is of somewhat heavier construction than the back-rest rail I6, but is cut out near its end sections to abut against the surface of the back leg sections l2 at a point somewhat below their center, and at which point two dowel receiving apertures 20 are provided to correspond with similar dowel receiving apertures 2| in the end sections of the cross rail 19. As the cross rail IS is placed in position. dowel pins 22 are passed through the respective apertures and 2|, the dowels providing a rigid and substantially durahle and strong connection between the leg sections and the cross rail I9.

It will be noted that the cross rail I9 is recessed as at 23, 23 for purposes hereinafter described.

A substantially similar type of cross supporting rail 24 connects the front leg sections I3 of the chair, the end portions of such front cross rail being also cut away sufiiciently to accommodate the thickness of the front legs l3, dowel receiving apertures 25 being provided in the end sections of the front cross rail to cooperate with dowel receiving apertures 26 in the front legs to receive pairs of dowels 2'! which are likewise of the half-split construction, and may preferab v have decorative heads 28.

The front cross rail 24 is likewise recessed at 29, 29. These recesses, together with the recesses 23, 23 in the rear cross rail l9, are of precisely the width to receive the ends of two slide rails 30, fitted between the front and rear legs of each side support of the chair. It will be noted that such slide rails are of substantially L-construction turned toward each other with the lower portions of the L-structure fitting snugly and firmly into the recesses 23 and 29 of the cross rails l9 and 24, respectively. It will be noted also that the slide rails 30 are fitted snugly into the redesses 23 and 29; they are also in rigid frictional contact with the adjacent surfaces of the back and front leg sections.

The entire structure thus assembled by means of the various dowels and the recessed cross rails and fitting slide rails, will have a rigidity and strength of connection of the component parts of my knock-down chair not ordinarily attained in the conventional structure of this general type of furniture.

The seat portion of my novel knock-down chair is constituted of a' substantially rectangular frame member 3| havin a plurality of transversely extending slats 32 secured therein in any suitable manner, for instance. by extending the ends of such slats into recesses provided in the side members of the frame. The entire seat frame 3| thereof upon the slide rails 30, so that the frame may readily slide upon the horizontal sections of such L-shaped slide rails between the vertical sections of such slide rails.

At the rear ends of the seat frame 3|, are provided a pair of substantially wedge-shaped wooden hinge members 33 having horizontal apertures passing therethrough in which are rotatably positioned pins 34 extending from the lower ends of a back-rest 35. The members 33 act as hinges or fulcrum supports for the backrest 35 which may be adjusted to a plurality of angular positions thereof with its back surface resting upon the chamfered edge 11 of the backrest rail l6 by the proper disposition of the suitable one of a plurality of blocks or adjusting cleats 36 provided upon the lower surface of each side rail of theseat frame 3! rearwardly of the front cross rail 24.

It will be seen from Fig. 4, in which one position of the back-rest 35 is shown in full lines and another position thereof in dotted lines, that a plurality of inclinations of such back-rest may be secured, depending upon which of the plurality of cleats 36 is positioned just rearwardly of the front rail 24 so as to abut thereagainst.

is positioned for sliding movement In the particular embodiment illustrated, three such adjusting cleats 36 are shown, but, of course, any number of such cleats may be used.

In Fig. 3 I have illustrated my easy chair in its fully assembled condition with a cushion 31 upon the seat portion, and a cushion 38 which may conveniently be disposed against the surface of the back-rest 35.

In Fig. 5 the component parts of the easy chair just described, with the exception of the cushions 31 and 38 and the cross slats 32 omitted from the seat frame 3|, are shown to illustrate the manner in which such component parts may be compactly packed in a small space for transportation or storage. The blocks 39 appearing in Fig. 5 adjacent the inner faces of members '33 are blocks glued on the back face of the back rest 35 to give such back rest thickness to receive the pins 34.

While I have described a specific embodiment of my invention, it is obvious that various changes therein, particularly in the configuration and disposition of the several parts thereof, may be made without departing fro-m my invention,

I claim:

1. An easy chair comprising a pair of angular supports, two of the sections of said supports constituting the legs of the chair and the intermediate section constituting an arm rest, a pair of cross-rails, one of which connects the rear leg sections and the other the front leg sections of said supports, each of said cross-rails being recessed at points near their connection to said' leg sections, a pair of L-shaped slide rails fitted between the front and rear sections of said supports and frictionally positioned within the recesses of said cross-rails, and a seat frame positioned for sliding movement upon said slide rails.

2. An easy chair comprising a pair of angular supports, two of the sections of said supports constituting th legs of the chair and the intermediate section constituting an armrest, a crossrail connecting the rear leg sections of said supports near their upper extremities, a pair of cross-rails, one of which connects the rear leg sections and the other the front leg sections of said supports, each of said latter cross-rails being cut away for half-lap engagement by said leg sections, and recessed in their upper surfaces at points near their connection to said sections, a pair of L-shaped slide rails fitted between the front and rear sections of said supports and frictionally positioned within the recesses in the upper surfaces of said cross-rails, and a seat frame positioned for sliding movement upon said slide rails.

3. An easy chair comprising a pair of angular supports, two of the sections of said supports constituting the legs of the chair and the intermediate section constituting an armrest, a cross-rail connecting the rear leg sections of said supports, a pair of cross-rails, one of which connects the rear leg sections and the other the front leg sections of said supports, each of said latter cross-rails being recessed at points near their connection to said sections, a pair'of L-shaped slide rails fitted between the front and rear sections of said supports and positioned within the recesses of said cross-rails, and a seat frame positioned for sliding movement upon said slide rails, said seat frame having at its rear a pair of hinge members and a back-rest hinged within said hinge members and adapted tobe supported against the first mentioned cross-rail the other the rear legs of the chair, each of said cross-rails being cut away near their ends to accommodate, in flush relationshship, the leg sections of said supports and a plurality of dowels connecting said cross-rails to said leg sections, said chair including a pair of L-shaped slide rails extending between and frictionally engaging the front and rear sections of each support and frictionally engaging the cross-rails by means of appropriately configured recesses within said cross-rails.

FERDINAND KRAMER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2518532 *Feb 2, 1949Aug 15, 1950Edwards Arthur BChurch pew
US2620024 *Dec 9, 1947Dec 2, 1952Robert B RietmanKnockdown chair and sofa
US2644511 *May 6, 1948Jul 7, 1953H Saint Maurice & Cie EtsSectional article of furniture
US2683483 *Sep 5, 1950Jul 13, 1954Hardy A NorvillDemountable chair
US2732889 *Mar 2, 1953Jan 31, 1956 healey
US2829707 *Jul 13, 1953Apr 8, 1958Liebson SidneyKnock-down furniture having interchangeable and replaceable elements
US2937384 *Sep 22, 1958May 24, 1960Shield Chair Co IncConvertible sofa-bed
US3222108 *Feb 18, 1964Dec 7, 1965Pablos Vicente SanchezChair construction with flexible seat and back
US4302048 *Dec 17, 1979Nov 24, 1981Yount Velma Ann MOccasional chair
US4343509 *Apr 2, 1980Aug 10, 1982Inter-Ikea A/SPiece of seating furniture
US4711492 *May 19, 1986Dec 8, 1987Svein AsbjornsenChair back arrangement
US20090195040 *Aug 25, 2006Aug 6, 2009Hilary Rolf BirkbeckVariable configuration seating
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/343, 297/411.42
International ClassificationA47C4/03
Cooperative ClassificationA47C4/02, A47C4/03
European ClassificationA47C4/02, A47C4/03