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Publication numberUS2365309 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 19, 1944
Filing dateJul 12, 1943
Priority dateJul 12, 1943
Publication numberUS 2365309 A, US 2365309A, US-A-2365309, US2365309 A, US2365309A
InventorsTalbot Frank A
Original AssigneeRobert E Barry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
High-pressure pump
US 2365309 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec.

F. A. TALBOT 2,365,309

HIGH PRESSURE PUMP Filed July 12, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet l UMM FIG. 2

INVENTOR.

Dec. 19, 1944. F. A. TALBOT HIGH PRESSURE PUMP Filed July 12, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. 2; W

Patented Dec. 19, 1944 HIGH-PRESSURE PUlVIP Frank A. Talbot, Baltimore, Md., assignor of onehalf to Robert E. Barry, Washington, D. C.

Application July 12, 1943, Serial No. 494,381

" (c1. 1os-5) 8 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in highpressure pumps and more particularly to a novel pump of the super-charger type.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide a compact high-pressure pump which may flt in a relatively small space on an airplane, for example.

Another object is to supply a high-pressure pump not liable to leakage of the pumped fluid.

A still further object is to furnish a pump of this character which may be readily dismantled for the changing of any part thereof.

A still further object is to provide a pump of this type which may be readily manufactured in mass production, as the parts are relatively few in number and extremely simple in contour.

With the foregoing objects outlined and with other objects in view which will appear as the description proceeds, the invention consists in the novel features hereinafter described in detail and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is an elevation of my improved pump.

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of the same taken on the line 22 of Fig. 1.

Figs. 3 and 4 are transverse sectional views taken respectively on the lines 33 and 44 of Fig. 1.

Referring to the drawings, 5 designates a main housing or casing, closed at one end by a cap 6, secured in place by screws 1 or the like, which extend through flanges of the cap and casing.

Within the cap and casing there is a circular chamber 8 in which is rotatably mounted, a rotor 9 having a hub l joumaled in the cap and provided with a sealing ring I I to prevent discharge of fluid between the contacting surfaces of the rotor and cap.

A drive shaft I2 is secured in the hub of the rotor by any suitable means such as a split ring l3 and is provided with a splined end portion II that is interlocked with the hub, for driving the rotor from the driving shaft.

A driven shaft I is splined to the rotor. as indicated at l6 and it extends through and is journaled in a collar ll, fixed in the housing and having a threaded connection therewith, as indicated at l8.

A bladed impeller wheel I3 is provided with a fixed key 20, interlocked with a recess 2| in the driven shaft, and the impeller is removably secured to the shaft by a screw 22 or the like. The impeller wheel functions to draw fluid into the inlet port 23 of the housing which port may be threaded, as indicated at 24, so that the incoming fluid may be conducted through a pipe or the like (not shown).

From the intake port, a flared surface 25 within the housing (conforming to edges of the impeller blades) merges into a wall 26 of a circular chamber 21, communicating with the intake ends of a multiplicity of cylinders 28 bored in the housing, in parallel relation in a circular row about the axis of the driven shaft, and each communicating at its opposite end with a discharge port 29 leading to an annular chamber 30 which in turn communicates with the common discharge port 3| of the pump.

Arranged in each cylinder is a reciprocating sleeve 32 that has a sliding fit in the cylinder and loosely surrounds a piston rod 33 rigidly united with a piston 34, slidably mounted within the housing. An abutment 35 of the piston is adapted to engage one end of the sleeve during the compression stroke and a winged nut 36 secured to the piston rod is adapted to engage the opposite end of the sleeve on the suction stroke. As each nut is winged, it will allow passage of fluid through the sleeve at all times, so that when a piston is on its suction stroke, the impeller will force fluid through the sleeve and into the cylinder 28 so as to build up a pressure in the latter before the piston commences its compression stroke.

Reciprocation of the, pistons is caused by the rotor in the following way. The rotor is dished as indicated at 31 to provide a wobbler surface for a wobbler plate 38. Ball ends 39 of connect- I ing rods 40 are connected to this plate in a universal manner by means of a ring 41 that is secured to the rotor by a retaining ring 42. The other end of each connecting rod is connected to one of the pistons by a ball and socket joint as indicated at 43.

To assist in preventing rotation of the Wobbler plate 38, it is provided with a gear 44 meshing with a stationary gear 45 preferably forming part of the fixed collar l1. As the rotor revolves the teeth of the gear 44 will successively engage the teeth of the gear 45 so as to insure alignment of the pistons 34 with the cylinders 28.

Each of the discharge ports 29 is preferably controlled by a ball valve 46, pressed towards its seat by a spring 41, adjustably held in position by screw plug 48. From Fig. 4 it will be observed that these plugs fit in radial holes in the housing so that they may be readily removed or adjusted.

Operation Rotation of the shaft [2 will cause turning of the rotor a and the impeller wheel is. The latter will act to draw in fluid through the port 23 and force it into the circular chamber 21 communicating with the intake ends of the cylinders 28, At the same time the wobbler plate 38 will cause reciprocation of the pistons, and as each piston is on its suction stroke the fluid forced by the impeller will pass through the sleeve of the piston and past the winged nut of that piston into the end of cylinder 28. On the compression stroke, the abutment 35 of the piston will engage and close an end of the sleeve so that the trapped fluid will be further compressed in the cylinder 28 and will be forced past the check valve 46 into the exhaust chamber 30 of the housing from which it may be discharged through the port 3| to any suitable point of utilization.

On each suction stroke of a piston, it will be understood that the abutment surface 35 will move away from an end of the sleeve and the latter will remain stationary until it is contacted by the winged nut of that piston which when it contacts the sleeve will force it to travel with the piston.

The pars are so constructed and arranged that no packing is required for the cylinders since all of the pumped fluid passes through passageways surrounded by solid metal until entering the discharge port 3|. Furthermore as there are large surfaces in contact between the rotor and the housing and its cap there will be no likelihood of leakage into the chamber in which the wobbler is arranged and as there will be no leakage, there will be no loss of pressure.

From the drawings it may be seen that the mechanism may be readily assembled or dismantled. The removal of the closure plate 6 makes the rotor and the parts to which it is connected, accessible, and after the closure plate is removed, if the rotor is shifted toward the left, the retaining ring 42 will act to cause the pistons and their sleeves to move out of the cylinders, providing of course the screw 22 is removed so as to allow the shaft ii to move with the rotor. The removal of the collar II which closes the hole through which the impeller wheel I8 passes, will allow the impeller to be removed from the chamher which it occupies.

While I have disclosed what I now consider to be' a preferred embodiment of the invention in such manner that the same may be readily understood by those skilled in the art, I am aware that changes may be made in the details disclosed without departing from the spirit of the invention as expressed in the claims.

I claim:

1. A pump comprising a housing having a series of cylinders arranged therein in parallel relation and in circular formation, a chamber communicating with one end of each of said cylinders, an intake port in said housing, an impeller wheel arranged in said chamber and positioned to draw fluid through the intake port and to force the same into said cylinders through the last mentioned ends thereof, piston rods arranged to reciprocate in the cylinders, sleeves surrounding the piston rods and slidably mounted in the cylinders and through which fluid pumped by the impeller wheel can enter the opposite ends of said cylinders, discharge ports in the housing communicating with the last mentioned ends of the cylinders, valve means controlling said discharge ports, and means for simultaneously rotating the impeller wheel and reciprocating said piston rods.

2. A pump comprising a housing, shafting rotatably mounted in the housing, a series of cylinders arranged in the housing in parallel relation to said shafting and in circular formation, each cylinder being spaced an equal distance from the axis of said shafting, a chamber communicating with one end of each of said cylinders, an intake port at one end of said housing, an impeller wheel arranged in said chamber, substantially surrounded by the cylinders and positioned to draw fiuid through the intake port and to force the same into said cylinders through the last mentioned ends thereof, piston rods arranged to reciprocate in the cylinders, sleeves surrounding the piston rods and slidably mounted in the cylinders and through which fluid pumped by the impeller wheel can enter the opposite ends of-saidcylinders, discharge ports in the housing communicating with the last mentioned ends of the cylinders, valve means controlling said discharge ports, and means for simultaneously rotating the impeller wheel and reciprocating said piston rods from said shafting.

3. A pump comprising a housing having a series of cylinders constituted thereby and arranged in parallel relation and in circular formation, a chamber communicating with one end of each of said cylinders, an intake port in said housing, an impeller wheel arranged in said chamber and. positioned to draw fluid from the intake port and to force the same into said cylinders through the last mentioned ends thereof, piston rods arranged to reciprocate in the cylinders, sleeves surrounding the piston rods and slidably mounted in the cylinders and through which fluid pumped by the impeller wheel can enter the opposite ends of said cylinders, discharge ports in the housing communicating with the last mentioned ends of the cylinders, check valves controlling said discharge ports, and means for simultaneously rotating the impeller wheel and reciprocating said piston rods.

4. In a pump of the character described, a casing provided with a circular chamber, a dishshaped rotor arranged in said chamber and having an elongated step-shaped surface slidably engaging internal surface of the casing, the rotor having a cavity provided with a surface arranged obliquely to the axis of the rotor, a non-rotatable wobbler plate arranged in the rotor and having a surface complemental to said oblique surface and engaging the latter, pistons arranged in a circular series in the casing about the axis of the rotor and slidably mounted in the casing, means having ball and socket joints connecting the pistons to the wobbler plate, a gear fixed to the wobbler plate and a stationary gear arranged in the casing and meshing with the last mentioned gear.

5. In a pump of the character described, a housing provided with a central chamber, a circular series of parallel cylinder bores substantially surrounding said chamber, ach bore having an inlet directly communicating with the chamber, fluid intake mean communicating with v the chamber, driving means, a rotatable shaft driven by said driving means and having its axis passing through the center from which the circle of the circular series of bores is struck, an im-.

peller wheel secured to the shaft and positioned in said chamber, said wheel being constructed and arranged to draw fluid through the intake means into the central portion of the wheel and to force it from its periphery directly into the inlets of the bores, reciprocating valved pistons slidably mounted in the bores and operatively connected with the driving means for reciprocation by the latter, and valve means spaced lengthwise of the bores from the fluid inlets for controlling the discharge of fluid from the bores.

6. In a pump of the character described, a housing provided with a circular series of parallel cylinder bores, a chamber arranged within the circle defined by said bores and directly communicating with each bore, an impeller wheel positioned in the chamber ior forcing fluid away from the axis of the wheel and directly into said bores, means for conveying fluid to the central portion of the wheel, valved pistons arranged to reciprocate in the bores, means for simultaneously rotating the wheel and reciprocating the pistons, and valve means for controlling the discharge of fluid from the bores.

'7. In a pump of the character described, a housing provided with a series of parallel cylinder bores having fluid inlets, each bore having a fluid outlet spaced longitudinally of the bore from its inlet, a chamber directly communicating with said inlets, an impeller wheel positioned in the chamber for forcing fluid away from the axis of the wheel and directly into said inlets, means for conveying fluid to the central portion of the wheel, valved pistons arranged to reciprocate in the bores and past which fluid flows from the inlets of the bores to the outlets thereof, means for simultaneously rotating the wheel and reciprocating the pistons, and valve means for controlling the outlets of the bores.

8. In a pump of the type having a substantially circular series or parallel cylinder bores arranged in a housing and each provided with an inlet and outlet, pistons arranged to reciprocate in the cylinders, a chamber in the housing communicating with the inlets of the bores, a fluid admission means communicating with the chamber, a rotatable impeller wheel arranged in the chamber and adapted to draw fluid through the admission means and force it through said inlets into the bores, and means for simultaneously rotating the impeller wheel and reciprocating said pistons, is substantially surrounded by said series of bores and directly communicates with the inlets of the bores, and the pistons are valved so that the fluid will travel from the chamber directly through the bore inlets, pistons and bore outlets, in the order named.

FRANK A. TALBOT.

the improvement in which said chamber

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2474661 *Mar 28, 1945Jun 28, 1949Nathan Mfg CoLubricating device
US2607296 *May 16, 1946Aug 19, 1952Herman G MuellerFluid pump unit
US2672095 *Dec 20, 1949Mar 16, 1954SiamHigh-pressure hydraulic pump
US2798663 *Dec 15, 1953Jul 9, 1957Gen Motors CorpRefrigerating apparatus
US2825241 *Dec 31, 1952Mar 4, 1958Oilgear CoPiston and piston rod assemblies
US2868443 *Jun 24, 1954Jan 13, 1959Gen Motors CorpRefrigerating apparatus
US2999463 *Sep 4, 1958Sep 12, 1961Rotol LtdVariable-delivery multi-stage hydraulic pumps
US3158102 *Feb 4, 1963Nov 24, 1964Task CorpCooling and sealing of rotary equipment
US3202101 *Jul 5, 1963Aug 24, 1965American Brake Shoe CoMethod and means for preventing cavitation in hydraulic piston and vane pumps
US3332356 *Nov 25, 1964Jul 25, 1967Sarl Rech S Etudes ProductionHydraulic pumps and motors with multiple cylinders of the barrel or swashplate type
US3641829 *Feb 16, 1970Feb 15, 1972Delavin Mfg CoPiston shoe holddown assembly
US4025238 *Apr 17, 1975May 24, 1977Messier HispanoApparatus for eliminating the effects of cavitation in a main pump
US4784045 *Sep 23, 1987Nov 15, 1988Sanden CorporationWobble plate type compressor with drive shaft extending into cylinder block
EP0234006A2 *Nov 26, 1986Sep 2, 1987Allied CorporationVariable displacement high pressure pump
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/203, 417/269, 417/511
International ClassificationF04B23/10, F04B53/12, F04B1/12, F04B53/10, F04B23/00, F04B1/14
Cooperative ClassificationF04B1/146, F04B23/106, F04B1/124, F04B53/122
European ClassificationF04B23/10D, F04B1/14C7, F04B53/12C, F04B1/12C2