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Publication numberUS2366654 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 2, 1945
Filing dateMay 4, 1942
Priority dateMay 4, 1942
Publication numberUS 2366654 A, US 2366654A, US-A-2366654, US2366654 A, US2366654A
InventorsKlein Victor G, Reisert August D, Rotter Lutwin C, Schneller Rudy F
Original AssigneeLincoln Eng Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump
US 2366654 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 2, 1945. L OTTER T AL 2,366,654

PUMP

Filed May 4, 1942 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 AW O-WJ PUMP Filed May 4, 1942 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Jan. 2, 1945. .-Ro1-TER ET AL 2,366,654

PUMP

4 Sheets-S heec 3 Filed May 4, 1942 E ME Rx mg /A W HV Wk? 1 doc N OE

the invention,

Patented Jan. 2, 1945 I UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE PUMP Lutwin C. Rotter, Maplewood, and Victor G. Klein, August D. Relsert, and Rudy F. Schneller, St. Louis, Mo., assignors to Lincoln Engineering Company, St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Missouri Application May 4, 1942, Serial No. 441,620'

4 Claims.

- be noted the provision of a lubricant pump which is driven by means of 'a continuously-operating, automatically-unloading internal-combustion engine, but which has a simplified pressure relieving apparatus, as compared to that shown in said patent; the provision of apparatus of the class described carried out in a compound form by means of a simple operating linkage for handling various supplies of lubricant; the provision of apparatus of the class described which operates very smoothly with optimum conditions of thrust; and the provision of apparatus of the class described which is knock-free and has minimum misalignment of parts or leakage under adverse conditions. Other objects will be in part obvious and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the elements and combinations of elements, features of construction, and arrangements of parts which will be exemplified in the structures hereinafter described, and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which is 11- lustrated one of various possible embodiments of Fig. 1 is an isometric view'of the apparatus; Fig. 2 is a vertical, median section taken substantially along line 22 of said Fig. 1, parts.

being omitted but showing basic structural features;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary horizontal section taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a horizontal section taken substantial-- ly along line 4-4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary horizontal section taken along line 5-5 of Fig. l and showing apressure control device;

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 5 but showing a second and similar but high-pressure control device; v

Fig. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary detail of a knock-eliminator, being taken on line |'l of Fig. 2;

. Fis. 8 is a horizontal section taken on line 8-8 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary detail pf an outlet check valve, being taken on line 9-9 of Fig.2;

Fig. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary detail of a bleeder valve, being on line Ill-Ill of Fig. 2;

Fig. 11 is an enlarged 'detail of a labyrinth packing; and,

Fig. 12 is an enlarged detail of an eccentric strap.

Similar reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

As stated in said Klein patent, in many cases itis desirable to operate a lubricant pump in locations where no electricity is available, and for this purpose a small internal-combustion engine, such as a gasoline engine or the like, is desirable. The desired lubricant flow, under pressure is irregular and intermittent, but it is not feasible to start and stop an internal-combustion engine accordingly. Furthermore, lubricant pressure should be instantly available at all times in the conduit which leads to the lubricant control valve for starting and stopping flow. The present invention accomplishes these ends by means of a construction improved over that of the patent.

Referring now more particularly to Fig. 1, there is shown at numeral I a chassis, including an axle 3 upon which are wheels 5, and also handles 1 for transport purposes. 9 on the chassis I support a small internal combustion engine H which constitutes the prime mover. This prime mover II is situated over an eccentric case l3 located substantially on a median line of the chassis l. The eccentric case 13 has extension sleeves l5 and H, at the front and back respectively. These cylinders l5 and i1 form enclosures and are capped by castings l9 and 2! respectively, held by tension studs such as I8 (Fig. 4). The assembly of parts [3, I5, ll,

I9 and 21 is supported upon the chassis I by suitable pads, such as indicated for example at 2 in Fig. 1.

The forward casting 2! supports a lubricant container 23 located ahead of the prime mover H, and the rearward casting I9 supports a lubricant container 25 located to the rear of the prime mover I l. By this arrangement there is obtained Vertical spacing pillars the main pin 43 is enclosed at its ends by means of scaled caps 45, from which the pin I3 is separate.

of a labyrinth packing indicated in general at 41 and detailed in Fig. 11. This labyrinth seal consists in a hat-shaped washer 19 which is held against a shoulder 5| by the hub 53 of the pulley 35. The hub 53 is held in place by nuts 55and a key 57. The flange 59 ofthe hat washer 99 is located in a counterbore M of the case I3. To the left of the flange 59 is an overlapping circular gasket 63 which is held in place by means of an overlapping metal washer 65 fastened by holding screws 67.

The sealed space SI is drained by means of a passage indicated at 65 in Fig. 3 so that any lubricant which runs along the bearin for the countershaft 31, and which cannot escape through sion to the left (Figs. 2, 4 and 12). Into the strap is rigidly threaded at the left a connecting rod I'I. At the right on the strap is an ear I9 carrying a pin joint 8| for a second connecting rod 83 reaching to the right. The center line A of the rigid threaded connection at 15 passes above a parallel line'D passing through the eccentric center B. Center C is below the line D. Another way of stating the advantageous position of the center C is that it is located to one side of the line K, indicated in Fig. 2. This line K passe through the center of the universal joint at 81 and the eccentric center B. The side chosen is that corresponding to the side of the mechanism center line upon which the large-angled stroke is desired. For example, in Fig. 2, C is below K, and therefore the large-angled stroke of 83 occurs beneath the center line of the apparatus. This arrangement has eflects later to be described.

The rigidly held connecting rod 1! is articulated to a relatively small plunger 85 by means of a universal joint 81. The pinned connecting rod 83 is articulated to a relatively large plunger 89 by means of a universal joint 9 I. The universal ,joints 81 and 9| are simple in mechanical form,

each comprising a cross pin 93 rotary with a close fit in a clevis 95 on the respective connecting rod,

a simpler form of connection between the gear 4 The countershaft 31 is sealed where it passes through the wall of the case 13 by means supply tank is indicated at 29. A belt drive from and the connecting rods I1 and 83 in the present case, it is more difficult to align than its crank equivalent. In the present case the eccentric however is the preferable means for effecting the drive, since it can have the special compound connections with the connecting rods made more simply than if a double connection were to be employed with an ordinary crank.

Another feature of this drive is the fact that the kinematic chain, constituted by parts I3, II (15, 11; the equivalent of one link), and plunger 85 constitute a so-called kinematically constrained four-bar chain. The linkage constituted by the parts I3, II, I3, 83 and 89 constitutes a five-bar chain which is ordinarily kinematically loose and not properly constrained; but in the present case, by reason of the coupling of this five-bar chain with the four-bar chain mentioned.

through common links I3 and II the five-bar scribed by way of example. This will be the cylinder in association with the plunger 85. Correspending numerals on the other cylinder (in asso-' ciation with the plunger 89) indicate like parts.

Referring for example to the left-hand end or high-pressure end of the device (at the left of Figs. 2.and 4), numeral IIII indicates the body of the cylinder. which on the outside has a shoulder I93 abutting and sealed against the outside of the casting I9. This cylinder IUI is held in place by a nut I95 at its opposite endjwhich holds the cylinder in place across the inner pocket 8 formed by the casting I9. Crosswise of the cylinder IOI is an inlet port II" which is counterbored to form. a surrounding seat I89. The end of the plunger 85 reciprocates across the inlet port I01. It will be seen that the castings I9 and 2| constitute inlet manifolds for leading lubricant from the respective containers to the respective inlets I01.

Coaxial with the port I91 there is threaded into the casting I9 a holder III in which is a stem H3. The stem II3 passes through a packing head I I5.

Inside. the stem H3 has a head III attached to which is a packing seat II 9 for engaging the may be reached through openings I29 in the body III. By adjustably threading the cup I25, an

adjustment of the spring reaction may be obtained.

Seating in a recess in the head I2I is a small plunger I3I (in the case of the casting I9) and the outlet check valve (to be described) of the cylinders IIJI.

One of these check valves last mentioned is detailed in Fig. 9, and comprises a threaded bushing I 43, having an opening I45 communicating with the respective cylinder IUI and normally covered by means of a plunger I41. The plunger ing I51 (Figs. 2 and 4) and to a suitable hose I58 (in the case of the casting 2|) and a hose.

I59 (in the case of the casting I9). Each hose carries a manual control valve I2.

' A relief valve I6I directed downward is associated with each bushing I43. Fig. 10 details the relief valves, each of which comprises a bushing I63 having an inner openin I65 adapted to be closed by screwing down a hollow plug I61. When the plug IE1 is backed off (as indicated in Fig. 10). its opening IE9 is placed in commu-- nication with the opening I65 and pressure is therefore relieved. Normally these relief plugs are shut.

In the high-pressure container is a follower I1I which rides upon the top of the grease supply in the. container and with which is organized manually operable means for placing resilient pressure on the follower; but since this follower construction does not constitute a novel feature per se, and since it is specified in said Patent 2,276,207, it will not be described herein further. Operation of the device, generally considered, is-as follows:

The tanks 23' and 25 are respectively filled with suitable lubricants and covers I13 applied, the.

follower I1I being arranged in proper following position upon the surface of the lubricant in the container 25. The covers I13 are closed.

Next, the relief valves I5I are opened tem-" porarily.

Then the gasoline engine II is startedfrom the starting device 21, by means of a suitable crank, winding ropeor the like. Thereafter the engine II operates continuously until it is cut oil in the usual manner. This continuous operation'is transmitted through the pulley 5. belt 33, pulley 35, gears 39, 4i, through the mechanism in the crankcase I3 to reciprocate the coaxial plungers 85 and 89.

Since, under the above conditions it may be assumed that there is substantially no pressure in either hose I59 or I59. the springs I23 are free to push back the stems H3, and thus will hold the heads II 1, H9 clear of the seats I99 (see Figs. 4, 5 and 6).

As soon as the engine has started lubricant is' pumped from relief valves I'6I and as soon as the engine is in satisfactory operation for continuous action under load, the relief valves ISI are. closed. This causes pressure to build up in actual values of the pressures depending upon the adjustments of the springs I23 through the adjustments to cups I25. When the inlets,,lll l,jare closed, no more lubricant is available to be compressed against the charge already in the .re-

spective hose, and the, engine therefore idles without being under load. The result is that fluid pressure is always instantly available in the hoses I58 as soon as the valves in the hoses open, but

the hoses I 59 and I59, it being understood that thehand valves I2 used respectively at the ends of these hoses are normally shut. The pressure.

as it builds up, is transmitted through the communicating lines I39 to the respective plungers- III and I33 so as to press the heads II1 along I .-with their packings II9 against the seat I99.

Thus closure of the inlets I91 occursat predetermined pressures in the hoses I53 and I59, the

without the necessity of constantly operating the engine under load.

As soon as the outlet valve I2 bf either hose I58 and/or I59 is opened, the respective pressure is incipiently reduced upon the respective plunger I3I or 133. Hence the respective spring I23 draws back therespective head H1 and thus 3 opens the respective port I91 to provide lubricant for maintaining the respective hose pressure.

Whenever the outlet valve I2 from a hose I58 or I59 is closed, the pressure in the respective hose builds up, whereupon the pressure in the respective connection I39 builds up. For example, supposing that the pressure in the left-hand line I39 builds up, this will gradually push the corresponding plunger I33 so as to force its respective valve ,1 against its seat I09, thereby closing off the supply of lubricant to the respective inlet I91. This unloads the plunger and consequently unloads the engine II of this fraction of the load. Closure of the outletof the other hose results in a similar action in respect to the other plunger 89. Thus it will be seen that opening either valve'at the endof either hose I58 or I59 results in opening the inlet sup ply for the respective pump plunger, so that that plunger becomes operative to pump lubricant to the respective hose. But when a given valve is shut, then the plunger associated with its hose is relieved of thework of pumping lubricant, which occurs at a predetermined pressure in the hose.

The fact that point C (Fig. 12.) is below line D makes the pressure thrust of the plunger 99 less angular than its suction thrust, with respect to the center lines of the respective cylinder IIII. This is desirable since the axial force on the pressure thrust is greater, and by means of this low angularity, large side thrusts on the plunger 89 and associated cylinder are avoided.

$ince the fluid which is being pumped is of the nature of a substantially incompressible fluid. though not completely incompressible, there is a tendency for a hammer or knock to occur due to surging, and -this effect is eliminated in the present construction by threading to the compression end of each pump cylinder I ill a cup I15 which communicates by way of a passage I 11. This cup has a removable enclosing and sealing cap I19 and contains loosely therein a cubicle -or other mass of synthetic rubber I81 in which When the rapidly rising pressure wave or surge from a compression stroke moves through the' lubricant being pumped, it also reaches the contained cubicle of rubber and is transmitted compresslvely to the air bubble I93 therein. This acts as a bufler to prevent a hammer-like blow or knock, and in consequence the operation of the machine is smooth under the'most rapid operation under heaviest pressures.

The advantage of the air bubble permanently I enclosed by means of resilient material such as synthetic rubber is that no complicated arrange- 'ment adjustment need ever be made in any part of the air bubble I83 in the cubicle or rubber is predetermined and always the same and is as small as possible consistent with the elimination of knocking. Once the proper amount has been decided upon, no change in the operating characteristics occur. It should be understood that the cubicle of rubber may have any shape, such f as cylindric or spherical, and that it maybe made in one piece.

In view of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

'As many changes could be made in the constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended. that ,all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

We claim:

1. Pumping apparatus comprisinga cylinder, a reciprocating plunger in the cylinder, said cylinder having an outlet, and having an inlet crossed by the end of said plunger, a check valve in the outlet permitting only outward flow, a valve seat associated with said inlet, an inlet valve mounted for motion to and from said seat, a spring biasing said inlet valve away from th seat, a conduit leading from the outlet side of said check valve, a plunger exposed to pressure in the conduit and operative under a predetermined degree of said pressure to move the inlet valve against the seat and against the action of said spring, whereby at a predetermined outlet pressure flow of lubricant into the inlet is prevented and wherebyfurther rise in outlet pressure from plunger operation is inhibited.

2. A lubricant pump comprising a cylinder, a reciprocating plunger therein, said cylinder having an outlet and having an inletcrossed by said plunger, a lubricant manifold around the inlet for leading lubricant thereto, a check valve in the outlet permitting outward flow only, a valve above seat associated with'said inlet, an inlet valve assembly comprising a body attached to the manifold, packing means associated with said body, a stern passing through the packing means and interiorly carrying an inlet valve opposite the inlet, ahead on. the other end of the stem, a spring pressing upon said head to bias the valve to open position with respect to the inlet, adjustable means reacted upon by the other end of the spring, said body having an opening for reaching said adjustable means for adjustment, a plunger associated with said stem, and a pressure connection between the outlet side of said check valve and said plunger, whereby a predetermined outlet pressure will eiTect automatic closure of said valve against bias of said spring.

3. Pumping apparatus comprising a cylinder, a reciprocating plunger in the cylinder, said cylinder having an outlet and an inlet, said plunger moving material from the inlet to the outlet, 3.

check valve in the outlet permitting only out-- ward'flow,.a valve seat associated with said inlet, an inlet valve mounted for motion to and from said seat, a spring biasing said inlet valve away from the seat, a conduit leading from the outlet side of said check valve, a plunger exposed to pressure in the conduit and operative under a predetermined degree of said pressure to move the inletvalve against the seat and against the action of said spring, whereby at a predetermined outlet pressure movement of material into the inlet is prevented and whereby further rise in outlet 1 pressure from pump operation is inhibited.

4. Pumping apparatus comprising 'a pressure pump having an inlet and an outlet, said pump transferring material from the inlet to the outlet and producing pressure, a check valve in the outlet permitting only outward flow, a valve seat 1 associated with said inlet, an inlet valve mounted for motion to and from said seat, means biasing said inlet valve away from the seat, a conduit leading from the outlet side of said check valve, a plunger exposed to pressure in the conduit and operative under a predetermined degree of said pressure to move the'inlet valve against the seat and against the action of said biasingmeans,

whereby at a predetermined outlet pressure movement of material into the inlet is prevented and whereby further rise in outlet pressure from pump operation is inhibited.

LU'I'WIN C. ROTTER. VICTOR G. KLEIN. AUGUST D. REISERT. RUDY F. SCHNELLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2495671 *Dec 18, 1944Jan 24, 1950Standard Steel WorksApparatus for dispensing viscose fluids
US2519968 *Feb 8, 1946Aug 22, 1950United Aircraft CorpFuel system
US3248020 *Oct 9, 1964Apr 26, 1966Fischer & Co H GHigh pressure source for viscous liquids, especially those containing suspended abrasive particles
US3305137 *Feb 18, 1965Feb 21, 1967Vilbiss CoPaint supply apparatus
US4378075 *Feb 17, 1981Mar 29, 1983Voss Klaus WilhelmApparatus for the simultaneous, metered dispensing of fillers and hardener pastes
US5147182 *Oct 17, 1990Sep 15, 1992Timmons Robert DIntegrated vacuum pressure system for a bladder pump
US7736477 *Jul 14, 2005Jun 15, 2010Panasonic CorporationProbe for measuring electric potential of cell
US8202439Jun 19, 2012Panasonic CorporationDiaphragm and device for measuring cellular potential using the same, manufacturing method of the diaphragm
US20070105183 *Jul 14, 2005May 10, 2007Masaya NakataniProbe for measuring electric potential of cell
US20090239033 *Jan 26, 2009Sep 24, 2009Panaconic CorporationDiaphragm and device for measuring cellular potential using the same, manufacturing method of the diaphragm
US20100147682 *Feb 25, 2010Jun 17, 2010Masaya NakataniProbe for measuring electric potential of cell
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/295, 92/161.5, 222/333, 417/540, 222/137
International ClassificationF16N13/10, F16N13/00
Cooperative ClassificationF16N13/10
European ClassificationF16N13/10