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Publication numberUS2367867 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 23, 1945
Filing dateFeb 24, 1938
Priority dateFeb 24, 1938
Publication numberUS 2367867 A, US 2367867A, US-A-2367867, US2367867 A, US2367867A
InventorsHiram N Huse
Original AssigneeHiram N Huse
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making playing balls
US 2367867 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan, 23, 1945. H N, HUSE 2,367,867

METHOD OF MAKING PLAYING BALLS Filed Feb. 24, 1958 INVENTOR M M WWW.

ATTORN EYS Patented Jan. 23, 1945 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,367,867 METHOD OF MAKING PLAYING BALLS Hiram N. Huse, Lansdale, Pa.

Application February 24, 1938, Serial No. 192,300

Claims. ('01. 154-18) The invention relates to an improvement in playing balls and has for one of its objects the provision of a method wherein during the winding of the core provision is made at the center of the core to allow of shifting and adjustment of the forces of the tensioned threads of the core.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a method of winding playing ball cores composed of elastic threads wound under tension, whereby the tension of the windings is equalized throughout, so that when the ball is hit, at any point on the surface, the flight reaction will be consistently equal.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a method wherein the solid, plastic or liquid substance heretofore universally used as the center of a ball core is eliminated, such material being replaced by thread wound under tension whereby the total resiliency of the ball is materially increased.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of a method which provides a construction insuring even penetration of the cover stock of the ball by presenting a uniformly compressive winding surface to the cover during the molding of the cover upon the ball-core.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a method which provides a perfectly balanced ball of even density and weight throughout, the inner windings of the ball core shifting their forces before the final windings have been applied.

By my improved method I provide also for increasing tractional control when the ball is hit by a club inasmuch as, due to the elimination of the usual inert center, a greater collapse area of the ball flattens against the club when the ball is played.

I have found that balls, the cores of which contain centers of solid, plastic or liquid substance oftentimes distort and become unbalanced and practically useless after a few strokes in play. I have found that this is the result of uneven thread windings adjusting their forces. The equalization of the tension forces of thread wound on a core center composed ofa sac filled with a plastic or a liquid, usually heavier than the thread windings, produces a distortion of the core and extreme distortion may concentrate at a point within the ball sufliciently to destroy certain of the windings. This, I find, weakens the ball materially and in extreme cases, were it not for the cover, the ball would burst at the point of concentration.

In a broad sense, the present invention provides for the production of a ball core wherein the winding of the core is started about a spherical center which eventually evaporates or melts, the core threads which are under tension automatically filling the void or cavity resulting from the evaporation or melting of the center, so that the finished core'is a solidly wound sphere the center having been replaced by tensioned threads. It is quite apparent also that the tension in the elastic threads or windings of the core will become equalized throughout so that when the ball -is hit, at any point on its surface, the flight reaction will be consistently equal.

In the accompanying drawing I have illustrated a ball core constructed in accordance with my invention, the drawing showing the core in its various stages of manufacture or formation.

Fig. 1 shows in section a ball core in its initial stages of manufacture.

Fig. 2 is a similar view showing the core as it appears after the center has evaporated or melted; and

Fig. 3 illustrates the finished core.

It is to be noted that I have not illustrated a finished ball in that the ball cover may be applied to the core in any well known manner.

In the practice of my invention I begin the winding of the core about a sphere of solidified carbon dioxide, for instance, designated 2, or I may employ a sphere of frozen water or other similar semi-rigid non-metallic material which will evaporate or liquefy at room temperature.

Elastic threads i, Fig. 1 are wound under tension about the center 2 and as winding proceeds the center 2 either evaporates or melts and the cavity is immediately and automatically filled by the tensioned winding threads. The gases resulting from the evaporation of the center 2 or the fiuid resulting from the melting of the center will escape, as will be appreciated, toward the outside of the wound core between the tensioned threads'composing the same. If desired, for convenience in handling for example, the sphere! may be enclosed initially in an extremely thin sac which through bursting or otherwise is incapable of retaining the fluid resulting from the evaporation or melting of the center.

Fig. 2 illustrates the appearance of the core of Fig. 1 after the center 2 has evaporated or melted, from which it will be seen that the space initially occupied by the center is now occupied by the tensioned winding threads.

Winding is then continued as indicated in Fig.

3 until the core has been built up to the desired diameter. as illustrated in the same figure.

It will be appreciated that in replacing the center 2, as the same evaporates or melts, the windings which are under tension will adjust themselves and equalize themselves in accordance with the equalization of their forces.

It will be quite apparent also that the total resiliency of the core is increased as compared with cores employing a center containing a. solid, plastic or a liquid substance such centers, by my construction, having been replaced by rubber winding threads under tension, and by the same token it will be apparent that the tension of the windings composing the core is equalized throughout, so that when the ball is hit, at any point on its surface, the flight reaction will be consistently equal.

It will be apparent also that my improved ball will be perfectly balanced and of even density and weight throughout and will present an evenly compressive surface to the cover stock thereby insuring uniform, even penetration of the cover stock during the molding of the same upon the core.

It will be apparent also that due to the absence of the inert center and the substitution of elastic tensioned threads an increased tractional control is obtained when the ball is hit by a club, inasmuch as a greater collapse area of the ball flattens against the face of the club.

It is to be understood that changes may be made in the details above described within the purview of my invention.

What I claim is:

1. In the manufacture of cores for playing balls, the method which comprises initially winding the elastic material of the core under tension about a center composed of a solid material which becomes fluid at room temperature, and allowing the material of the center as it becomes fluid to escape to the exterior of the core.

2. In the manufacture of cores for playing balls, the method which comprises initially winding an elastic thread under tension about a center composed of a solid non-metallic material which becomes fluid at room temperature, the application of elastic thread under tension being continued after the center has changed to a fluid and escaped from the core, until a core of the desired diameter has been built up.

3. In the manufacture of cores for playing balls, the method which comprises winding elastic thread under tension about and in immediate contact with a center composed of a material which becomes fluid at room temperature, winding being initiated while the center is solid and continuing after the center has changed to a fluid and escaped between the winding threads to the core exterior.

4. In the manufacture of cores for playing balls, the method which comprises winding elastic thread under tension about and in direct contact with a center composed of a material which becomes fluid at room temperature, winding being initiated while the center is solid and continuing after the center has changed to a fluid and escaped to the exterior of the core, the thread being wound under sufficient tension so that the void or cavity resulting from the conversion of the center to a fluid and the escape or the fluid will fill with thread under tension, to produce a core the center of which is composed of elastic thread under tension.

5. In the manufacture of cores for playing balls, the method which comprises winding elastic thread under tension immediately about and in direct contact wtih a sphere of solidified carbon dioxide, the thread being wound under sufficient tension so that as the solidified carbon dioxide evaporates and is allowed to escape from the core the space formerly occupied by the same will be taken up by the tensioned threads.

6. In the manufacture of cores for playing balls, the method which comprises winding elastic thread under tension about and in direct contact with a sphere of frozen liquid, applying the thread with suillcient tension so that as the frozen liquid melts and is allowed to escape from the core the cavity thereby formed will be automatically filled with tensioned thread, and continuing the winding until a core of the desired diameter has been built up.

'7. In the manufacture of playing balls, the method which comprises forming a substantially spherical envelope of tensioned elastic material about a spherical center, and subsequently removing said center, said envelope by reason of the said tension taking up the void left by the center and forming a substantially spherical body consisting essentially of the elastic material composing said envelope.

8. In the manufacture of playing balls, the method which comprises winding elastic strand under tension about a spherical center so new form a superimposed substantially spherical tensioned envelope, and subsequently removing said center, said envelope by reason of the said tension taking up the void left by the center and forming a substantially spherical body consisting essentially of wound elastic strand.

9. A method of making golf balls which comprises winding an elastic strand, under tension, about a spherical core until a partially wound ball is formed, removing the core'from said partially wound ball to provide a shrunken elastic body of substantailly spherical shape, and subsequently applying additional windings of elastic strand under tension to the shrunken elastic body remaining after the removal of the core.

10. Method of making golf balls which includes the steps of winding an elastic strand, under tension, about a spherical core to form an elastic body of substantially spherical shape, and removing said core to leave a shrunken bodyoi substantially spherical shape consisting entirely of elastic strand.

HIRAM N. HUSE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6287216Dec 3, 1999Sep 11, 2001Acushnet CompanyWound golf ball and method of making same
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/80, 156/155, 156/162, 156/87, 473/356, 473/354, 62/1
International ClassificationB29D99/00
Cooperative ClassificationB29D99/0042, B29L2031/54
European ClassificationB29D99/00G