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Publication numberUS2368441 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 30, 1945
Filing dateMar 21, 1942
Priority dateMar 21, 1942
Publication numberUS 2368441 A, US 2368441A, US-A-2368441, US2368441 A, US2368441A
InventorsClay P Bedford
Original AssigneeClay P Bedford
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of prefabricating ships
US 2368441 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 30, 1945.

C. P. BEDFORD METHOD OF PREFABRICATING SHIPS Filed March 21, 19 42 5 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. CL A Y P. BEDFORD METHOD OF PREFABRICATING SHIPS Filed March 21, 1942 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. CLAY BED/FORD A 7'TOENEX Jan. 30, 1945. C p B'EDFVORD 2,368,441

METHOD OF PREFABRICATING SHJ IPS Filed March 21, 1942 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. 62.4 Y I? BEDFORD g/QfM4 147' TORNEY Jan. 30, 1945.

"c. P. BEDF' ORD METHOD OF PREFABRICATING SHIPS 1942 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 0. a mm W T M mow p. 6 w w my a B Q v Filed March 21,

85 t FIE-LT ATTORNEY a 8 5 i /Fm E T l 7 m M 7.. j V n VIM P a 1.. 7 EE 8. a A w w Aw a d E /FUOU D,\7/\E. um m m m m v 9 0U DO um m 1945- c. P. BEDFORD METHOD OF PREFABRICATING SHIPS Filed March 2i 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. CLAY F. 550F020 .4 7' TORNE Y.

Patented Jan. 30, 194-5 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE METHOD OF PREFABRICATING SHIPS Clay P. Bedford, Berkeley, Calif. Application March 21, 1942 Serial No.4;35,65'6

13 Claims. (01. 114-65) This invention relates to shipbuilding and particularly pertains to a method and means. of economizing and conserving time and labor in the fabrication of ships in mass production. While it is highly useful in the fabrication of cargo ships, tankers, and the like, it is also adapted for use in the fabrication of other types of ships.

It is the usual, and as far. as known, universal practio in shipbuilding, first to erect the hull, together with appropriate braces, reinforcements and supports, and then after launching, to equip the Vessel with its various structures of a midships deckhouse', after deckhouse and mast houses,

thereby consuming many weeks and months of additional time in the finishing and equipment of the vessel. Under present demands for mass production of cargo type vessels, it is desirable to cut down as much as possible on the length of time between the laying down of the keel and the placing of the finished ship in commission.

Under the present practice, many steps of construction and assembly must be deferred until certain others have been completed, with the result that not only does the building of the ship require a certain period of time, but the way on which the ship is built is occupied by the ship for a certain period of time during which it cannot be used for the construction of another ship. The period of time that is required to build a ship and the period of time that the ways is occupied bythe ship during its construction can both be reduced by increasing the hours of labor until enough workmen in suitable shifts are continuously working to obtain maximum speed of production under present practice. Even'though work be done continuously with the maximum number of workmen possible, there is a fixed maximum in the speed of production beyond whichimprovement is impossible. Thi maximum will vary for ships of different characteristics and will be determined by such characteristics. There.

is, accordingly, for any ship of predetermined characteristics, a minimum period of time required for its construction and a minimum period of time that the ways is occupied by it.

Many steel ships are now being built of' steel plates, beams and perhaps other forms, in a manner involving the joining of the plates to each other, and perhaps other parts thereto, by welding. The welding of bulkheads to an overhead deck is more diflicult than welding with the line of juncture below the eyes and hands of the workman.

Objects of this invention are to provide a method for the construction of ships which lessens the previously fixed minimum periods of time required for the construction of a ship and during which the ways is occupied byit, which avoids jects will be apparent on rea ing this specification.

The present invention broadly stated, comprises the pre-assembly or pre-erection or Dre-construction of rather large and heavy sections orparts of deck superstructure housings, supplying such sections, where needed, with suitable temporary struts, braces or other reinforcing or supporting means so that the large and heavy sections will be structurally sound and may be suspended and lifted by cranes into place on the ways or on the partially constructed ship without substantial deformation of the lifted sections and without the occurrence of undue stresses or strains therein, and then welding or otherwise fastening the preassembled sections together. Thus, instead of assembling all the individual elements of the housing serially, one after another, the present invention comprises the simultaneous pre-assembly of very large and heavy sections in suitable pre-assembly buildings or stations, transporting these sections to the ways, and then uniting the pre-assembled sections to the hull or deck and to one another.

Another feature of the invention is the arrangement of the dividing line between adjacent sections to make permanent parts of the sections provide the necessary supports in order to minimize the necessity for temporary supports, and to minimize the joining or connection of pipes, conduits, decks and bulkheads, especially if insulated, and 'otherparts. The arrangement of the dividing lines between sections is also such that all parts on which work is to be done will be easily accessible to the workman, such a the ship fitters, plumbers, pipe fitters, electricians, those working on specialty subcontracts, deck coverings and the like, the joiners or wood workers, the

The present invention has been developedto that endby a method which permits at the same overhead welding and permits the welder to do time that the keel is laid down, work may be started on the accessory superstructures and proceed simultaneously with the building of the hull so that upon the completion of the latter, these accessories may be ready to be installed in fixed position on the" ship; resulting not only in a tremendous saving of time but the cutting down of many hours of labor. l

One of the serious problems, however, in such an undertaking, is the fact that these superstructures bein of steel and usually consisting of a plurality of decks, are not only cumbersome but may weigh upwards of '75 tons. The present invention involves a plan by which a structure, such as a deckhouse, can properly and advantageously be'built as self-containing sections, wherein each section may be treated and handled as a separate unit through the various stages of erection of the unit section and on through to its final equipment and finish, including all of the above-mentioned operations. These "various steps are performed progressively in various stages in the plant. After completion and after the vessel is ready to receive these superstructures, the sections are moved finally into position on the ship; the sections then duction of the United States Maritime Commission EC 2-S'-C1 type cargo vessels. Referring to the drawings which form'a part of this specification:

Figs. 1-9 represent an exploded perspective view of a ship without'th'emasts;

Fig. l is a perspective view ofthe hull; Fig. 2 is 'a' perspective view of the forward section of the deckhouse:

Fig. 3' is a similar view of the next section thereof;

Fig. 4 is thereof;

Fig/5 is a similar view of the after section thereof;

Figs. 6, 7- and-8-are similar views of the masthous'e's and appurtenant winches;

Fig. '9 is a similar view of the after deckhouse. Fig. 10 is a more or less schematic type sectional view of the completed deckhouse with appurtena'nt parts, looking aft;

Rigs. 11, 12 and- 13 are more or les schematic a similar view of the next section type views illustrating. the construction of the deckhouse sections;

Fig; 14 is a similar viewshowing decks ofthe deckhouse sections in assembled relation;

Fig. la is a plan view showing the arrangement of rooms, passageways and'other spaces'on the bridge deck level of the midships deckhouse, the deckhouse being in ectionsj Fig; 16'is a'similar view presenting similar features of the deck 'next below, that is, at the boat deck levelythe deckhouse'being; in sections;

Fig. 17 isa's imilar view presenting similar features of 'the'dejck; next below, thatis fatthe upper deck levelfthe deckhouse being in sections;

Fig. 18 is a perspective view showing part of the means for lifting a completed deckhouse section; and i Fig. 19 is a more or less schematic athwartships sectional view' showing strengthening means to maintain the parts of a 'deckhouse section in nor mal relation while being lifted.

The completed hill! is shownas l, and within it isthe so- 'c"alled"seco nd deck, 2. The upper deck 3 is above the second deck and forms theceiling for the rooms, compartments, and passageways for which the second deck"constitutesthe floor.

The deckhouse 5' (Fig. 10) ison the upper deck,

and 'is formedof the sections 6,1, 8 and 9'(Figs.

2 5). 'Themast houses H), "H and |'2 -(Figs 6, 7 and 8) are also 'on'the upper deck; and they are .above which is an elevated deck 23 provided with suitable protection walls 24 for machine guns and gunners; The mast houses and after deckhouse are assembled complete and then placed in the proper positions on the upper deck to which the respective deck sections 18 and 22 are welded.

The-mast house and after deckhouse are each of such size and weight that they can be lifted by means of cranes and placed in proper position on the ship. In at least one shipyard where the United States Maritime Commission ECZ-S-Cl cargo vessels are being built, cranes are available which have a capacity of about 75 tons and which are capable of lifting and suspendin the mast.

- houses and the after deckhouse in complete units.

overand cover the deckopenings I3, 14 and' 151 The after deckhouse la-{s n the same level and over 'the deck' opening l 1- The hulhdeks, deck- The complete midships deckhouse, however, is of a weight which far exceedsgthe capacity of such F cranes, the weight being such that it becomes necessary to divide it into at least four sections so that it can be lifted and moved by such cranes. While cranes could no doubt be built capable of handling the completed midshipsdeckhouse as a unit, yet it is often desirable to builta unit in separate sections in order to afford easy access to materials needed for-and to men-working on the installation of fittingsand furnishings, since the division into sections opens up passageways through which the men and materials must pass, which may otherwise be too narrow or-constricted for free movement therethrough. For mas production, the deckhouse sections-6, T, 8 and 8- are built as completely as is possible, and pre-assembled with bolt connections for-aligning.- A list of theweights ofthe various housing follows:

Item Pounds Forward mast house i. 70, 000 Midship mast house. 41, 000 After mast'house 55, 000. Midships deckhou 466, 076' After deckhouse 0, 237

The midships deckhouse is thus much heavier than is. capable of being handled bymost shipyard cranes and it. is-the-refore pre-built'as separate sections 6, 1;. B and 9. v

The manufacturing procedure, after the. steel plate are-received-and unloaded, is to place them:

in platestcrage racks for use as needed, o'rto. usethemimmediately; as the case may be. plates are laid out-on a platform, suitable teme. plates placed-thereon, and marks made on the, plates according to the templates. The plates; are then burned or cutalong the marked lines and subjected to whatever manufacturing steps;

may be required, such asrolling, punching, shears ing, bending, and=the-like. Further procedure will be understood by referring tov Figs. :11 to 14.

in conjunction withFigs 2'to 5;

The next procedure is the assembly of the plates into various complete mast houses, a f t'er deckhouse, and sectionsofthe midships deckhouse. v The boatdeck 28 is next above the upper deck 3; Bulkheads 29" run from the upperrdeckto the underside of the boat deck above, and theyare welded to the boat deckdtby-placing the boat deck upside-down with the bulkheads}! sup; ported to'project upwardly therefrom (Fig.- 11),

The

' oration; I

welds being applied at 30. The bridge'deck 3| is next above theboat deck and constitutes the ceiling for any rooms, compartments or passageways between the two. Bulkheads 32 between the two are attached by turningthe bridge deckupsidedown, and supporting thebulkheads 32 to project upwardlytherefrom, whereupon they are welded at 33 (Fig. 12) The house top 34 ,isneXt abovethe bridge deck and for'ms the; ceiling for any rooms, compartments or'passageways-there betweem The-bulkheads 35 forming the compartments between the house top and the bridge deck are. similarly attached to the house top while it is upside downiFig. 13), and welded theretoat 36. A great advantage results from assembling the bulkheads with the decks in upside-down position, because this permits of a downhand rather than The assembly illustrated on Fig. 11 is then placed =rightside up on the upper deck 3 .and

welded thereto at 37, this weldingoperation be-.-

ing likewise a downhand, rather than an overheadoperation. The assembly illustrated on Fig. ,12.

is then placed right side up on the boat deck 28 an overhead welding opthe installation of the fittings and furnishings.

As prefabrication is completed the separate seo-.

tions are unbolted and transferred inksuccessive order to the hull, where they are again erected in sequence and rebolted prior to final welding raised and lowered thereby. A bar 62 is provided and welded thereto at 38; and the assembly 'illustrated on Fig. 13 is placed right side up on the.

The upside-down assembly, by weldingv of the :bulkheads to the deck andlthereafter attaching them bridge deck 39 and welded thereto at 39.

by welding to the deck below in. right side up position, eliminates the otherwise necessary overhead Welding which requires more skill and time than ordinary or downhand welding.

After the steel parts have been welded as just described into the deckhouse sections, such secwith plates 63 to which they cables 6| are suitably attached. Attached to the plates 63 also are cables 64, to which inturn bars 65 are attached. Suspended fromthe bars .65 or from the ends of the cables 64 are pairs of cables 66, 6'! which are suitably attached tothe piece to be moved in any suitable manner (not shown). The cables .63 are held suitably spaced. from each other by a bar 65, and the same is true of the cables 61; while the two pairsof cables 66 and 61 areheld suitably spaced from each other by the bar 62 which also holds the cables Bl uitably spaced from each other.

Depending on theweight and other characteristics of the particular piece to be moved, it may undergo-distortion, stresses or'strainswhile sustions are furnished and finished to the fullest extent possible. The ship fitters, plumbers, pipe fitters, electricians, those working on specialty subcontracts, those working on deck coverings;

the joiners or wood workers, those working on installation of insulation, those installing built-in or attached furniture, the painters, the finishers, and those doing any other jobs in the, deckhouse. and finally the inspectors and checkers, complete theirv work and pass upon the work don in each individual section. Itmigh-t be stated here. that pipes are in suitable positions so that connections can be easily made when the deckhouse sections are joined together, and the same is true of electrical conduits. 'It is preferred at the present time. notto place the electrical wiring complete in; each deckhouse section before such section-s are assembled into a 7 complete deckhouse, but to have sufficient wire coiled in an end section (6 or 9), and then after the deckhouse sections have been united into a complete deckhouse, =unroll the wire and place it in the conduits provided therefor. However, if preferred, the wiring can be completed in each section, the different sections of wire being suitably joined and the joints insulated, as is well known in the art.

It may often be. desirable to join the various sections of a unit together by means of bolts, clips or other joining devices, in order to insure positive fit and alignment of th various sections and their fitting-s and furnishings, and also their positive realignment and fit when later erected on the hull. The resulting unit may then be moved, as forexample on a roller runway, adjacent to the hull, if not already there; whereupon the sections maybe unjoined from each other and separately lifted onto the hull. Under certain con-.- ditions of operation, it may even be desirable to temporarily join the sections together before pended by the crane, and too great a weight might result in permanent deformation orin a piece becoming less sound structurally than may be desired; unless suitable precautions be taken. Struts, braces or other type of supporting or strengthening means maybe used where needed to minimize the undesirable effects of suspending the piece, such for example as flexible cables ll (Fig- 19) provided with turnbucklesv 12 for the purpose of shortening them to provide suflicient tension to prevent various structural members from receding from each other, and braces 13 comprising rigid members having oppositely running threads 15 and collars 16 having threads interiorly thereof which register with the threads 15. The members 13 can be lengthened to provide sufficient compression to prevent various members from approaching each other, by turn- I ing the collars 16 in the proper direction.

Certain parts of'the structure itself which is to be suspended ,will provide the necessary strength adjacent thereto and avoid the necessity for additional strengthening or supporting means thereat. For example, bulkheads between and attached" to next adjacent decks will function more or less as supporting or strengthening means for such decks, particularly adjacent bulkheads. There may, however, be lengths of decks attached to bulkheads only atone end of suchlengths, as will be referredto hereafter. In such instances additional means such as those indicated at H and 14 may be required temporarily during suspension, and what and where theyshould be is merelya matter of good engineering and mathematical calculation.

The plans of the various decks of the midships deckhouse appear on Figs. 15, 16 and 17, these figures showing the house with the sections 6, l, 8 and-9 separated from each other. The lines of separation between adjacent sections are preferably straight at each deck, and preferably with starting; or after starting but before completing,

completed' items, whether com-- lying in a vertical plane. In other Words;rthe lines of separation between .the'sec-tionst and l are straight lines at each deck andsuperimposed over each-other. The same is true of the sections 1 and 8, and of the sections '8 and 9., It thus anpea'rs as though the individual: sections have been sliced off the complete deckhouse. This may-not be essential, but it simplifies not only theipro-v duction of the sections 6, 1, 8 and 9, but also-their assembly into a unitary deckhouse. w

The bridge deck at is over the boat deck '28 and forms the ceiling for the rooms and-passage ways therebetween; The boat deck is over the upper deck 3 and forms the ceiling for the rooms and passageways thereb'etween. The house 'top' 34, not shown on Figs. I6 and 1 7 but appear: ing' on Figs.- l0, l3, l4- and 1'9; is over the bridge deck 3'! and forms the ceiling for the rooms and passageways therebe'tween. The deck plans for these three decks may be any desired. Then-1 vision or separation lines 8? between the sections" 6 and 1 are preferably in an upright plane at all} points touched thereby. The same is tracer-"the division or separation line 82 between the sections 1 and '8, and also ofthe division or separation line 83 between thesections" 8 and 9'. The locations of the division or separation lines will be determined primarily by the weigh-tsof the resulting sections, each of which as already ex-- plained, must be below a certain maximum de'- termined by the capacity of the lifting crane available.

These lines will also belocated asf'ar pessi--- ble in such amanner that the workmenwill have access to and canwork upon each partof each section on which work of any kind is to-be done while it is still a separate section; sothat; as far as is convenient, the least number oftemporary strengthening meansduring the suspension the'separate sections by the cranewill-beneeded; and to'require cutting or interference 'o'ffihe minimum amount of deck covering, pipe lines: electric conduits; and the like. It has been found advisable to locate the division orsepara tion lines where possible through passageways, such for example-as 85, 86; 87 88 and' 'so closely adjacent to any available bulkheads; such as 89; 90, 91-, 92, and the like, that such b'ulk'heads will maintain the structural strength of thesection while the section is suspended without least addition of temporary strengthening elements thereat. The additional strengthening means are to be used wherever the separa-tibn or division lines between the sections-would cal-ise -sufficient weakening to result in permanent distortion of deformation on even in undesired stresses and strains, for example at such locationsas 55, '93; 9'1 98, 99, l00,and-the1ike1 The structure of the complete midships deckhousemay be'considered as cellular with th'e cell's arranged more or lessirre'gularly at the s'ameahd at di'ilerent levels. While thiss'eem's tdc' m'pli cate the determination of the mostdes'irable'lo cations of the division or s'eparatibrr lines between the individual" sections; the given above simplify the app'arent complexity. I

Aninherent characteristic of the inventionlie's inthe method of fabricating thecellular whether these units are a; deckhcufseora boiler room or analogous parts-ofa ship; where two spaced de'ck or-ilo'or members and connectingbulkl'ieads are to assembled". 'A'fter adjacent-- sections have been pieced;

, proper position; theyarewelded to" the s'l'ilp drto thex'separation lines at the superimposed decks,

theiupperdeck, and to each other; As the welding proceeds, the additional temporarystrengthening means may be removed. The final 'prod not has the same structure and the same-strength as if the whole were fabricated merely by adding one-steel plate at a time.

The invention has been described with respect t'o-the construction of welded steel ships audit is there that it has its greatest value. Gertainfeatures of the invention are, however, useful also in the construction of shipswhere rivets, bolts or other fastening means than welds are used to hold the steel plates together on only certain parts or all over the ship. g

Claimsto the features, wherein the deckhouse structures are constructed in the upside-down, position and subsequently reversed and mountedon the hulLare presented in my divisional application, Serial No. 540,462, filed June 15,1944.

Certain details have been referred to for the purpose of describing the invention, but some ofthem may be" varied without departing from the spirit of the invention, the scope ofwhich is defined in the appended claims.

WhatI claim is:- V

1. The" methodof shipbuilding which includes the steps of erecting a hull on the ways ,-simul-, taneously fabricating the various superstructures of deckhouses, in the-fabrication of which-deckhouses the structure is built in individual sections of which a plurality are adapted to constitute a complete deckhous'e unit, each section comprising upper. and lowerdeck portions and connecting: bulkheads, and then assembling said sections 'on shipboard and uniting them to the ship and to each other in permanent position.

2. The method of shipbuilding which includes the-"steps of erecting ahullon the ways; simultaneously fabricating at a: location apart fromthe" ways the various superstructures of deck houses, in the fabrication of. which deckhouses" the structure is build in individual sections of which aplurality are adapted to' constitute acomplete deckhouse" unit, each section comprisin'g upper and lower deck portions" and connect ing: bulkheads, moving said sections to the loca'-- tion of the" ways,- a'nd'then assembling said sec-- tions on shipboard and uniting them to the ship and to each other'in permanent position.

3. The method of shipbuilding whichincludes the steps of erecting a hull on the' waynsimul taneousl'y fabricating at a location apart: from the ways the various superstructures 'of' deckhouses, in the fabrication of whien deekhouses the structure is'built in individual sections of which a pluralitylare adapted to constitute a complete deckhouseuni't, e'a'ch section-commie: ing upper and lower deck portions" and" connect ingbulkheads, assembling the sevral sec'tioiis ih' their ultimate relation, securing said' se'ctions in that relation, dividing" said assembly into a 'plu rality of sections, and finally assembling said plurality of see'nens on shipboard and uniting tnem te the'sliip and'to-each other in permanent position'as a-unitary structure.

4i Thelfie'tho'd of Shipbuilding which'iilcll'lds the steps of erecting a hull'o'n' thewaysg s'in'iiil ta'neously fabrica't'ihg'the various superstrilctiires of deck'houses, the fabrication 'of'whicli' deckhouses the structure is-bu'il-t ih' individual-sec none of which a plu-r'ality are adapted to c'ohstitute a; complete d'eckhou'se' unlit} each section coin prising upper" ahdlow'et deck portions" and cenziectin g bulkheads and each s'ectio'n including tructure-having severe-week '=lv1's'= in height;

then assembling said sections on shipboard and unit them to the ship and to each other in permanent'position.

5. The method of shipbuilding which includes the steps of erecting a hull on the ways, simultaneously fabricating at a location apart from ing them to the ship and to each other-in per- I manent position.

6. The method of shipbuilding which includes the steps of erecting a hull on the ways, simultaneously fabricating the various superstructures of deckhouses, in the fabrication of which deckhouses the structure is built in individual sections of which a plurality are adapted to constitute a complete deckhouse unit, each section comprising upper and lower deck portions and connecting bulkheads, outfitting each section with permanent equipment-including pipes, conduits, and other fixtures adapted to be joined to similar equipment of adjacent sections in a completed unit, and then assembling said sections on shipboard and uniting them to the ship and to eachother in permanent position and uniting the portions of said equipment of adjacent sections. 7. The method of shipbuilding which includes the steps of erecting a hull on the ways, simultaneously fabricating at a location apart from the ways the various superstructures of deckhouses, in the fabrication of which deckhouses the structure is built in individual sections of which a plurality are adapted to constitute a complete deckhouse unit, each section. comprising upper and lower deck portions and connect;- ing bulkheads, outfitting each section with permanent equipment including pipes, conduits, and other fixtures adapted to be joined to similar equipment of adjacent sections in a completed unit, moving said sections each with its respective equipment therein to the location of the ways, and then assembling said sections on shipboard and uniting them to the ship and to each other in permanent position and uniting the portions of said equipment of adjacent sections.

' ways the various superstructures of deckhouses,

in the fabrication of which deckhouses the structure is built in individual cellular sections of which a plurality are adapted, to constitute a complete deckhouse unit, each section comprising upper and lower deck portions and connecting bulkheads, connecting the sections temporarily into their unitary' final assembled relation for 1 alignment, separating the section of the unit,

y the ship and to each other in permanent position.

u the steps of erecting a hull on the ways, simulthe lines of separation between adjacent sections beingiin vertical planes, moving said sections to the location of the ways, and then assembling said sections on shipboard and uniting them to 10. The method of shipbuilding which includes taneously fabricating at a location apart from the ways the various superstructures' of deckhouses,

in the fabrication of which deckhouses the structure is built in individual cellular sections of,

which a plurality are adapted to constitute a complete deckhouse unit, each sectioncomp-rising upper and lower deck portions and connecting bulkheads, connecting the sections temporarily into their unitary final assembled relation for alignment, separating the sections of the unit, a I

the lines of separation between adjacent sections of upper and lower decks lying in a vertical plane,

moving said sections to the location of the ways, and then asssembling said sections on shipboard and uniting them to the ship and to each other in permanent position.

11. In the method of building a steel ship, the

steps which include the prefabrication of a deckhouse as a structural unit, having a plurality of levels in height, said deckhouse at each level com- 8. The method of shipbuilding which includes the steps of erecting a hull on the ways, simultaneously fabricating th various superstructures of deckhouses, in the fabrication of which decktions of the unit along vertical lines of cleavage,

and then assembling said sections on shipboard and uniting them to the ship and to each other i permanent position.

9. The method of shipbuilding which includes the steps of erecting a hull'on the ways, simultaneously fabricating at a location apart from the prising an upper and a lower deck portion and.

connecting bulkheads, assembling separately each lower deck portion with its bulkheads into a cellular structure, assembling together to constitute a whole deckhouse structure the several last named cellular deck-level structures, dividing said so assembled deckhouse in vertical planes of cleavage adjacent to the correspondingly located bulkheads, moving the resultant sections to position on the ships hull, and permanently uniting the sections to each other and to the ship.

12. The method of shipbuilding which includes the steps of erecting ahull on the ways, simul-,

taneously fabricating at a location apart from the ways, a deckhouse structure of full size-for erectionon said hull, separating said structure into a plurality of sections each having upper and lower deck portions and connecting bulkheads and each section having several'deck levels in height, then assembling said sections on shipboard and uniting them to the shipand to'each other in permanent position. 3

13. The method of shipbuilding which includes the steps of erecting a hull on the ways, simul-] taneously fabricating at a location apart from p the ways, a deckhouse structure of full size for erection on said hull, separating said structure into a; plurality of sections each having upper and lower deck portions and connecting bulkheads, and then assembling said sections on shipboard and uniting them to the ship and to each other in permanent position.

I CLAY P. BEDFORD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3218775 *Sep 7, 1960Nov 23, 1965Jackson Thomas JColumn structure erection method
US3363597 *Jul 27, 1966Jan 16, 1968Gen Dynamics CorpShip and method of construction
US3371639 *Nov 29, 1966Mar 5, 1968Gen Dynamics CorpPodule assembly method for ships
US3440990 *Dec 22, 1967Apr 29, 1969Blohm Voss AgCargo ship construction
US3648639 *Feb 26, 1970Mar 14, 1972Ashland Oil IncBoat and method of construction
US3797439 *Jul 27, 1972Mar 19, 1974Mitsubishi Heavy Ind LtdMethod of outfitting an engine room of a ship
US4476798 *Aug 17, 1982Oct 16, 1984Consolidated Olympic CorporationIntegrated multiple purpose universal ship hull and replacement module system
US4732103 *Oct 25, 1985Mar 22, 1988Martech International, Inc.Method of converting an ocean cargo barge into an offshore manned service barge
US7921609Jan 30, 2006Apr 12, 2011Neapo OyRoom arrangement, ship, building and method for constructing a room arrangement
WO2003047960A1Dec 3, 2002Jun 12, 2003Kaefer IsoliertechnikLiving area, particularly for offshore use, boat with such a living area, and method for constructing a living area
WO2006079682A1 *Jan 30, 2006Aug 3, 2006Aker Finnyards OyRoom arrangement, ship, building and method for constructing a room arrangement
Classifications
U.S. Classification114/65.00R, 29/DIG.420
International ClassificationB63B3/14
Cooperative ClassificationB63B3/14, B63B2701/08, Y10S29/042
European ClassificationB63B3/14