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Publication numberUS2370088 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 20, 1945
Filing dateOct 28, 1942
Priority dateOct 28, 1942
Publication numberUS 2370088 A, US 2370088A, US-A-2370088, US2370088 A, US2370088A
InventorsStults Harold L, Stults Ruth K
Original AssigneeStults Harold L, Stults Ruth K
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Article for cleaning
US 2370088 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb 20 1945 R. K. sTULTs ET Al. 2,370,088

ART ICLE FOR CLEANING Filed Oct. 28, 1942 I INVENTORS Ruf/z K. SLLZS Patented Feb. 20, 1945 Ruth K.

stung and naroldL. smits,

New York, N. Y.

Application october' 28, 1942, serial No. 463,592

2 Claims.

This invention relates to cleaning and more particularly to a method and means for utilizing cleaning materials, such for example, as soap flakes and cleansing powder/ n An object of this invention is to provide for the practical and ecient use of cleaning materials. A further object is to provide for the efficientl and dependable cleaning of lobjects such as dishes. A still further object is to provide a simple and practical method and apparatus for making full use of soap particles or akes in such a manner that the soap may be moistened and used Without the disadvantages usually encountered during this procedure.

Cleaning substances, such asv soapf are available in a large variety of forms, such as akes, granules, chips and powder, most of which are particularly prepared for rapid dissolving in water to form suds; these substances in their various forms are sometimes referred to below collectively as soap particles. In normal practice, the soap particles are poured into a body of water, or water is poured or drawn into a basin containing soap particles. When this occurs, the soap particles do not all Ydissolve because the initial wetting of the individual particles causes them to stick together and form large lumps or agglomerates. These large lumps will not dissolve readily so that time is lost, and in fact, alarge amount of soap is wasted. In addition to this, the undissolved lumps tend to stick to the articles being Washed with the result that dried soap appears when the articles are dried.

A further diliculty encountered in the past has been that when, forexample,'dishes are to be Washed where there is only one sink, it was necessary to form a quantity of suds in the sink and thereafter the dishes couldnot be rinsed. It is a further object of this invention to avoid these diculties.

The invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements, arrangements of parts and in the several steps and relation and order of each of the same to one or more of the others, all as will be illustratively described herein, and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.

In the drawing, in which is shown one of many possible embodiments of this invention:

Figure 1 is a plan view of a novel wash cloth representing one embodiment of the invention;

Figure 2 is a fragmentary view of the lower .portion of Figure 1, showing soap particles as they are poured onto the edge of the dish cloth;

Figure 3 is a view similar to Figure 2 and showing the first step in rolling the dish cloth into a roll;

Figure 4 is a view showing the roll completed;

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 2, but showing the soap particles deposited along the longitudinal side edge of the dish cloth;

Figure 6 is a View similar to Figure 4 showing the dish cloth rolled from the edge shown in Figure 5; and,

Figure 7 is an enlarged detail view of the fabric of which the dish cloth is formed.

The present embodiment of the invention relates particularly to washing dishes in avnovel and dependable manner.` 1n this embodiment of the invention, soap flakes are deposited in a strip or pile along one edge of a dish cloth, and the dish cloth is then rolled to form a roll With the strip of soap at the center of the roll. The

dish cloth is of a loosely woven fabric to permit water to flow into and out of the roll, but in doing so the water runs through the several thicknesses of the fabric which surround the soap. Thus, the Water enters the roll and comes into direct contact with the soap, and the soap being in small particles is easily dissolved, forming a very good suds. However, due to the faCt that the soap is surrounded by several layers of the fabric, the soap particles are trapped and held in place and are not dislodged by the Water. In fact, when the soap particles are -initially wet, the tendency to form agglomerates or lumps, as well as the tendency to adhere to the fabric, results in the soap being held in place in the roll.

The roll'itself acts somewhat like a sponge and absorbs water; this Water is converted into suds and due to the texture of the fabric, the roll, impregnated with suds, is particularly suited for scrubbing soiled surfaces. Thus, the roll is admirably adaped for actively scrubbing articles, such as dishes and silverware, there being a direct application of the suds to the soiled surfaces while the scrubbing is taking place;V No more suds are formed thani are actually used, and no soap escapes without being formed into suds.

Referring particularly to Figure l of the drawing, the dish cloth 2 has its four corners folded over to form four pockets 4, 6, 8, and Ill. Each of these pockets is formed by folding the side edge back as shown and then stitching it in place. In use, the dish cloth is laid at, as in Figure 1,

and (see Figure 2) a strip of the soap particles, such as soap flakes, is poured onto the lower edge of the cloth between pockets 8 and l0. The edge of the cloth between pockets 8 and I0 is then folded over the soap as in Figure 3, and the cloth is rolled, starting at this folded edge. When the roll is complete, the ends of the roll itself are tucked into pockets 4 and 6 as shown in Figure 4, and these pockets act as securing means to hold the roll from coming apart. Water is then poured or run onto the roll or the roll is dipped into water; as outlined above, this forms a. fine suds.

The roll itself is used for scrubbing andlit discharges the suds directly onto the surface which is being cleaned. When the soap within the roll has been entirely used, the roll is unrolledv and another quantity of soap is placed in it. The wet condition of the cloth does not interfere with refilling the roll with soap, and in fact, the soap tends to cling to the wet cloth. The dish cloth is of loose fabric, as shown in Figure 7, sothat water can easily enter and leave the center of the roll. However, the several layers of cloth surrounding the soap tend tohold the particles of the soap in place, and undissolved particles do not pass from the roll.

When desirable, the cloth of Figure 1 is used by placing a row of the soap particles along the side of the cloth between pockets 6 and l0, as shown in Figure 6; and, the cloth is then rolled from this side forming the completed roll shown in Figure 6, with the ends of the roll tucked into pockets 8 and 4.

During use, the rate at which the soap dissolves depends upon the amount of Contact `between the soap and the water, andthis depends upon many factors, such as the nature of the fabric and the number of layers of the fabric surrounding the soap. The roll -of Figure 6 has a larger number of layers of cloth than does the roll of Figure 4 so that the single cloth is adapted to be used for two different rates of .soap dispensing. The rate of soap dispensing `also depends upon the amount of soap which is deposited within the roll, and the present embodiment of the invention is particularly suited to carry a wide .range of quantities yof soap. Pockets 4, 6, v8, and l0 are so proportioned as to securely `hold the roll from coming apart and to hold the soap in place. rIlhe pockets are formed as `the edges of the cloth are being bound by folding the corners of the cloth back 'and binding the overlapping edges in one operation.

When soapparticles such as scouring powder is used, the undissolved powder sifts out from the center fof the roll and forms an ideal scouring cloth.

As many possible `embodiments may be made of Ythe mechanical features of the .above .invention and as -th'e art herein described mig-ht be varied in various lparts, all without departingfrom the scope of the invention, it .is 'to :be understood Vthat all matter herei'nbefore Vset zforthfor shown in 'the accompanying drawing lis to :be interpreted as illustrative and not .in a -limi-tingsense'.

We claim:

1. An article comprising, a loose fabric cloth of substantially rectangular form having first, second, third and fourth edges with the iirst and third edges opposite to each other and with the second and fourth edges opposite to each other, said cloth being rolled from said iirst edge into a roll with said i'lrst edge on the inside of the roll and with said third edge on the outside of the roll so that the second and fourth edges are spirally positioned at the ends of the roll, the cloth .at the juncture of said first and second edges being folded over so that the end of said second edge is folded back on itself with the overlying edge portions fastened together to form a pocket means, the cloth adjacent the juncture of said first vand fourth edges being folded over `so that the end of said fourth edge is folded back on itself with the overlying edge portions fastened together to form a pocket means, and a quantity of soap particles evenly distributed within said cloth along said first edge and between the two pocket means, the edge portion of the cloth along said third edge having its two ends which are respectively at said second and fourth edgesfolded over with the adjacent end portion of eachof said second and fourth edges overlapping and attached together so as to form pocket means at the ends of said third edge into which the roll ends are partially inserted, the edge portions along said first and third edges being free of attachment to the adjacent portions of the cloth except at said second and fourth edges.

2. An article comprising, a loose fabric cloth of substantially rectangular form having rst,

second, third and fourth edges with the first and third edges 'opposite to each other and with the .second and fourth edges opposite to each other, said cloth being rolled from said iirst edge into a roll with said first edge on the inside of .the rollv and vwith said third edge on the outside of the roll so that the second and fourth edges are spirally positioned at the ends of the roll, the cloth at the juncture of said iirst and second edges being folded over so that one edge portion at the juncture overlies a ksimilar edge portion adjacent thereto with the overlying edge portions fastened` together so as to form a pocket, the cloth adjacent the juncture of said first and fourth edges being folded over so that one edge portion at .the juncture overlies a similar edge portion adjacent thereto with the overlying edge portions fastened together so as to form a pocketl and a quantity of soap particles evenly vdistributed within said cloth along said first edge and between lsaid pockets, the edge portion of the cloth .along said third edge Lhaving two end pockets at its ends which are respectively at said second and fourth edges, each of said end pockets being formed .by attaching together overlapping edges yof the cloth, the roll being partially vinserted at its ends in the respective end pockets, the edge portions intermediate the ends of said first and third edges lbeing free of atachment vto the adjacent portion of the cloth.

RUTH K. .STULTS HAROLD L. SI'ULTS.

Classifications
U.S. Classification401/201, 15/209.1
International ClassificationA47L13/16
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/16
European ClassificationA47L13/16