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Publication numberUS2370450 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 27, 1945
Filing dateMar 30, 1943
Priority dateMar 30, 1943
Publication numberUS 2370450 A, US 2370450A, US-A-2370450, US2370450 A, US2370450A
InventorsEdgar W Clarke
Original AssigneeInterwoven Stocking Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitted article
US 2370450 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 27, 1 E. w. CLARKE KNITTED ARTICLE Filed March 30, 1943 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 gym fi wv m m .HTFFiV LFW ATTORNEY.

Feb. 27', 1945. E. w. CLARKE 2,370,450

KNITTED ARTICLE Filed March 50, 1943 3 She'etsSheet 2 aU-V /////,1"

7 g g 'd awn:

W 4 4? I \62 I I a 60 46' v a N INVENTOR.

50am? I44 CLARKE ATTORMEY.

b- 27, 1945- E. w. CLARKE 2,370,450

KNITTED ARTICLE v Filed March so, 1943 s Sheets-Shea}. a

. k 0% I g v INVENTOR. :3- v EDGAR\WCLMKE 2:: x v BY ATTORNEY Patented 27 1945 I umrso STATES PATENT V OFFICE KNITTED ARTICLE Edgar w; Clarke, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, as-

signor to Interwoven Stocking Company, New Brunswick, N. 1., a corporation of New Jersey Application March 30,1943; Serial No. 481,071

' ing longer loops of one thread than of the other, so that the long loops hereinafter referred to as terry loops protrude on one surface of the fabric and provide a softcushioning effect. For example, the two threads maybe fed to the needles and knitted with the needle loopsof the'threads in plated relation, but with the sinker loops of one thread longer than the corresponding sinker loops of the other thread to form the terry loops. The terry loops may or may not be combed or brushed so as to separate the fibres and commingle them in a soft matted condition on the surface of the fabric, The invention is particularly applicable to the knitting of articles of hosiery wherein the heel, sole and toe portions may be formed of terry fabric to provide greater softness and resiliency while the leg and instep may be formed of rib knit fabricincluding broad rib or Links-Links fabric. 7

It has heretofore been proposed to produce terry fabric by means of a circular knitting ma chine provided with sinkers having shoulders at different levels, the main knitting thread being drawn over a lower ,shoulder and the terry 35 As the lower end of the upper cylinder must be thread over a higher shoulder, whereby the sinker loops of the terry thread are longer than those of the main knitting thread and form the projecting loops of the terry fabric. The use of a two level sinker to produce terry fabric necessitates a change in the sinker wave, which may adversely affect the operation of the machine, for example in knitting portions of fabric where terry is not desired. Moreover, thelength of the terry loops-obtainable with this arrangement is strictly limited, particularly in a machine where there is a restricted space for operation of the sinkers, as in 'a machine having co-axial needle cylinders. A further difficulty encountered isthat since the upper shoulder over which the terry thread is drawn and the lower shoulder 4 over which the body thread is drawn are on the same sinker, the'ymustnecessarily bemoved in or out together and hence-movement of the sinker has to bee compromise between that de-' sired for the-long terry loops and thatrcquired for knitting the body thread. No independent movement of the two shoulders is possible.

It is an object of the present invention to over-- come these dimculties and produce terry fabric 5 having long terry loops and at the same time accurately control the plating of the body thread and the terry thread so that the desired thread will appear on the surface of the fabric. In accordance with my invention the terry loops are produced by instrumentalities located above the sinkers, and operated independently thereof. whereby the saidinstrumen-talities can be moved in or out as desired, without interfering with the normal operation of the sinkers. These instrumentalities, hereinafter referred to generically as bits, are adapted to project out between the needles in such manner as to separate a plurality of threads fed to the needles so that one thread is fed below the bits and another thread above the bits. Upon manipulation of the needles to receive and knit both of said threads, the sinker loops of one thread are drawn over the sinkers, while longer sinker loops of the other thread are drawn over the bits. The long loops of thread drawn over the bits constitute the terry Where reference is made loops of the fabric.

to feeding one thread above the bits, and another thread below, it will be understood that additionalthreads may be fed to the needles, as 80 desired.

The present invention makes it possible to produce longer terry loops on a coaxial cylinder knitting machine than could be obtained with special sinkers having shoulders at two levels.

spaced only a slight distance above the upper end'of the lower cylinder to produce satisfacduce long terry loops. However, by having terry forming bits associated with the upper cylinder,

and cooperating with the needles operated in the lower cylinder to form the terry loops, loops 4 of any desired length can be obtained. Moreover, the independent operation of the terry bits accurate plating of these threads without interfering with the operation of the sinkers.

It is a further-object of the invention to promakes it possible to utilize them to separate the terry and the body threads and to control the i ing broad rib and Links-Links fabric. For example, an article of hosiery in accordance with my invention may have an anti-ravel edge, a top portion formed of rib knitting, leg and instep portions formed of rib knitting with a different stitch structure from the top, and heel, sole and toe portions of terry fabric. Further objects of my invention include producing a knitted article c m'prising a rib knit section and an integral terry section having long terry loops providinga soft, thick fabric; forming the terry loops of a continuous terry thread, thereby avoiding the loose ends incident to cutting an intermittently knitted thread and accurately controlling the plating of the thread in both the terry and. the non-terry portions of the article to insure that the desired thread forms the outer face of the fabric.

Other objects and advantages of my invention will be understood from the following description and claims in conjunction with the accom panying drawings which illustrate a embodiment selected to illustrate the invention.

In the drawings,

Fig. 1 represents an article of hosiery made in accordance with my invention.

Fig. 2 represents on an enlarged scale the stitch structure of a section of fabric in said article.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of a knitting machine for carrying out my invention.

Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic view showing the cams for operating the needles and sliders of said machine, the needles and sliders being shown schematically in side elevation at the right hand side of the figure.

Fig. 5 is a schematic view showing the operation of the needles, sinkers and bits in forming terry fabric.

Figs. 6 to 10 are fragmentary views illustrating diagrammatically the successive steps 'in forming the stitch structure of the fabric.

In Fig. 1 there is shown an article of hosiery produced in accordance with my invention and having an anti-ravel edge I, a top portion 2 formed of rib knit fabric, a leg portion 3 and an instep portion 4, both formed of rib knit fabric which is preferably different from that of the top portion, and a heel portion 5, sole 6,

toe band land toe 8, all formed of terry fabric.

The stitch structure'of the fabric is shown in Fig. 2 wherein the upper portion of the figure represents a section of the leg 3; thelower left hand portion of the figure represents a section of of the body thread B and constitutes the terry loops of the fabric. The term "needle loop is used herein to designate the lower portion of the stitch, i. e., the portion engagedby the needle in forming the stitch, while sinker loop is used to designate the upper part of the stitch, whether drawn over a sinker or other instrumentality. It will be seen that there is a terry loop l0 corresponding to each sinker loop ll of the body thread B so that a dense, soft terry fabric is provided. T avoid obscuring the stitch structure, the terry loops are shown shorter than they would ordinarily be in carrying out my invention. Preferably, the terry loops should be at least twice as long as the sinker loops H of the body thread. In the instep portion 4 and the leg 3,

. the same threads B and T are knitted in plated relation to form rib knit non-terry fabric, 1. e. the threads are drawn together so that corresponding loops of the respective threads are of substantially the same length. Hence, in the rib portion of the fabric, the sinker loops I2 of the terry thread T are of substantially the same length as the sinkerloops ll of the body thread B. The toe band I may be formed of terry fabriconly on the sole half thereof, or all the way around as shown.

In knitting the socks shown on a circular knitting machine having superimposed coaxial cylindate, the top portion 2 is knitted withevery other needle in the upper cylinder to produce a 1 x 1 rib or with different needle arrangements to produce any rib desired. Upon completion of the top portion, certain needles are transferred from one cylinder to the other to leave groups of six needles in the lower cylinder, alternating with groups of three needles in the upper cylinder. The needles operating in the lower cylinder form outwardly facing stitches constituting the outer ribs of the fabric, while the needles in th upper cylinder form inwardly facing stitches constitutthe heel 5 and the lower right hand. portion of theflgure represents a section of the instep l. The leg 3 and instep l are composed of rib knit non-terry fabric which is shown as 6 x 3 rib, but may be Links-Links or other rib knit fabric as desired, while the heel 5, together with the sole 6,

toe band I and toe 8 are formed of plain knit terry fabric. By plain knit terry fabric is meant terry fabric in which all the needle loops 7 are drawn-to the same face of the fabric, as dis tinguished from rib knit fabric in which some of the-needle loops are drawn to one face of the fabric, and other needle loops are drawn to the opposite face. In the terry portion of the,fabrlc,

- abodythreadBandaterrythreadTareknitte'd in-such-manner that needle loops are formed of both threads drawn together in plated relation, while the sinker loops'are drawn'separately so that the sinker loops ll of the terry thread T ir lonserthanthesinkerloop ll mg the inner ribs. It will be understood that rib fabric other than 6 x 3 rib canbe obtained by suitable transfer of the needles. When the upper portion of the heel 5 is reached, the needles on the instep side of the cylinder remain in position to continue rib knitting while consecutive needles on the sole side of the cylinder are all positioned on the lower cylinder, and the instrumentalities for forming the long terry loops come into operation to produce the terry fabric of the heel. The latter group of needles which up to this point have been producing rib knitting, must now produce terry fabric. Moreover, during the knitting of the sole 6 and instep l, one group of needles knits terry fabric while another groupof needles knits rib fabric so that part of each course is terry and the remainder is rib. Although the fabric to rib fabric since the'terry thread is continuous and is knitted in plating relation with the body thread in the rib knit of the fabric. When the toe band-l is reached, the needles on the instep side of the cylinder are transferred to thelower cylinder, and if it is desired to produce terry fabric all the way around the toe band, the terry bits on the instep side of the cylinder come into operation. The two groups of bits dispose respectively on the sole side and ,on the instep side of the cylinder, thus begin operation at different times. In knitting the heel form fabrichaving terry loops in each wale of each course so that a dense terry fabric is provided in the heel and toe portions.

In accordance with my invention, the plating of the two threads can be accurately controlled both in the terry and the non-terry portion of I the fabric so that the desired thread forms the diiierent portions of the fabric, for'example, to obtain a design efiect. Plating of the threads is accurately controlled by operation of the mechanism for forming the terry loops, as will be more 4 fully explained below.

A knitting machine for producing articles in' accordance with my invention is described and claimed in my co-pending application Serial No. 453,993. In Figs. 3 to 10 of the drawings, there is shown so much of the machine as is necessary to illustrate my invention. The invention is shown as being carried out on a knitting machine of the type in which superimposed coaxial needi cylinders are provided with needles havin hooks at both ends, suitable transfer mechanismbeing also provided for shifting the needles from one cylinder to the other whereby all of the nee- I dles may be assembled in the lower cylinder for v the production of circular plain knitting, or alternate needles or groups of needles may be transferred from the lower cylinder to the upper cylin-. der to produce rib knitting. The particular machine shown in the drawings is of the general type manufactured by William Spiers, Ltd., of Leicester, England, and certain parts which are .not necessary to an understanding of the invention herein claimed have been omitted for the sake of clearness and succinctness.

The machine illustrated has a lower needle. cylinder t5, 'an upper needlecylinder l6 and a circular series of needles .I! having a hook and latch at each end and operable in either cylinder (Figs. 3 and 4); When in the lower cylinder, th needles are operated by sliders l8 engaging the lower hooks of the needles, and having knitdown by center cam 24 and stitchcam 2-5 to draw loops of thread fed to the needles and cast off previously drawn stitches and being then raised by riser cam 26 and clearing cam 21 to a clearing position wherein the newly drawn loops are placed under the latch. When the cylinder is rotated in the opposite direction as whenv oscillated in knitting the heel and toe, the lower cylinder needles are drawn down by center cam 24 and a heel stitch cam 28 and are thereafter raised to clearing position by heel riser cam 29 and heel clearing cam 30. During the knitting of the heel and toe, the-lower cylinder needles on the instep side of the cylinder, i. e., the long butt needles are raised by switch cams 3| to an inactive position in which they hold their stitches while the knitting butts of the respective sliders pass above center cam 24. The switch cams 3| are movable vertically from the inoperative position shown in' Fig. 4 to a higher operative position for raising the long butt needles.

The cams for operating the needles in the upper cylinder comprise a stitch cam 33 and clear- V ing cam 34.v The upper cam block is also provided with a welt cam 35 which is withdrawn to allow the knitting butts of the sliders to pass through an idle track 36 so that the upper cylinder needles will hold their stitches without knitting during the lrrnittin'e. of welt courses on 'the lower cylinder needles, and with a switch cam 31 operable in conjunction with lower cylinder switch cams 3| to render themeedles on the instep side of the cylinder inactive during the knitting of the heel and toe. There are also provided an upper transfer cam 38 and a lower transfer cam 39 which are movable inwardly and outwardly and act on transfer butts of different lengths to transfer needles from one cylinder to the other as desired.

The movable cams such as the transfer cams,

welt cam and switch cams are movedinto and out of operative position by suitable mechanism for example, under the control of a pattern drum which is intermittently racked around during the knitting of the article. 'Asthe control of such cams is well known in the art, it will not be described in further detail.

Adjacent the upper and lower stitch cams,

there is provided a feeding station for feedin thread to the needles. vAt this feeding station the body thread B and terry thread T are fed in spaced relation so that the instrumentalitics for forming the terry loops of the terry fabric can come between them andseparate the two threads.

In the particular arrangement shown, the feed .for the terry-thread .T is provided by a hole or ting butts I9 and transfer butts 20 adapted to engage needle operating cams. sliders operating the needles on the "sole side of the cylinder, i. e., the side on which the heel,-

sole and toe of an article of hosiery are knit have short knitting butts while the sliders for needles on the opposite side of the cylinder, i;.e.,

Preferably, the

slot 46 in latch guard 41 and the feed for the body thread B comprises a feed finger 48 (Fig. 3)

The lower cylinder is provided with sinkers 50 (Fig. 3) or equivalent instrumentalities disposed between successive needles and adapted to cooperate with the needles in forming stitches. The sinkers are shown as having butts 5| which are acted on by sinker cam 52 to move the sinkers between an inner position shown at the left hand side of Fig. 3 and an outer position shown at the right hand side of said figurer- In accordance with my invention, the instrumentalities cooperating with the needles to form the long terry loops comprise a series of bits 53 (Fig. 3) associated with the upper cylinder. The bits 53 are located directly above the-sinkers 50 so as to project out betweensuccessive needles when the needles are in position to receive thread fed at the feeding station. The relation of the bits to the thread feeds is such that the bits project between the two threads so that the terry thread T is fed above the bits while the body thread B is fed below the bits and between the bits and the sinkers. Where reference is made to feeding one thread above and another thread below the bits, it is not necessary for-one thread feed to be above and the other below the level of the bits, but only for the threads to be fed in at least-slightly separated relation to one another and in such relation to the bits and needles that one thread is received above the bits'and the other below. The needles operating in the lower cylinder are raised high enough to receive both the body thread B fed above the sinkers but below the bits and the terry thread T fed above the bits. When the needles are drawn down by the stitch cam, loops of body thread are drawn over the sinkers while loops of the.

terry thread are drawn over the bits, as shown in Figs. 5 to 9.

Fig. 5, represents diagrammatically the passageof the needles through the knitting wave, and

' shows how the terry thread '1 is fed to the needles above the bits while the body thread B is fed to the needles below the bits. Fig. 6 shows the relative positions of the needle, sinker, bits and threads at the feeding station. Fig. 7 shows a needle beginning to draw a loop of the terry thread over the bits 53 and receiving the body thread B in the hook of the needle. Fig. 8 shows the needle drawn down to draw a loop of the body thread over the sinkers and a much longer loop of the terry thread over the bits. Fig. 9 is a perspective view of the parts in the same position as in Fig. 8 and shows how the new stitch loop is drawn down through the previous stitch. It will be seen that the needle loops of the body thread B andthe' terry thread T are drawnin plating relation while the sinker loops are drawn separately with the sinker loops of the terry thread much longer than the sinker loops of the body being shown approximately twic as long. If desired, the sinkers 50 may be set lower to increase still further the difference in length of the terry loops and the sinker loops of the body thread.

The terry bits 53 are illustrated as being moved between an inner retracted position and anouter position in which the bits project out beyond the needle circle to separate the terry thread and the body thread as described above. The bits are moved out as they reach or approach the thread feeding station and are retracted to release the terry loops after loops of the terry thread and body thread have been-drawn by the needles,= as illustrated in Figs. 8 and 9, While the bits 53 'or equivalent, instrumentali-ties may be supported gaging a'cam track in a cam 62 located above the dial 54. The cam 62 is held against rotary movement by being secured to shaft 55. As the dial 54 carrying the bits 53 is rotated with the needle cylinder while the cam 52 is held against rotation, the bits 53 are moved in and out by action of the cam on the butts 60. The cam 62 is positioned in predetermined angular relationship with respect to the feeding station to pro- ,iect and retract the bits at the proper time. Thus the terry forming instrumentalities 53 are inserted between the threads from inside the needle cylinder and are movable in and out independently of the sinkers. Optimum operation of both the sinkers and the bits 53 is hence possible.

When the needle cylinders are turned alternately in opposite directions as in knitting the heel and toe, the relative positions at which the bits are projected and the point at which the threads are fed to the needles must be shifted' upon reversal of the direction of rotation to assure proper separation of the threads. In the arrangement shown in the drawings, this is accomplished quite simply by oscillating the bit cam 52 when the machine is operated by reciprocation. At its upper end and above the usual top plate of the machine, the shaft 55 carrying cam 52 is'provided with a pair of arms adapted 'toengage a stationary buffer block. The angular spacing between the arms permits the shaft 55 and hence cam '62 to oscillate through a predetermined angle which is preferably adjustable. The cam is oscillated within the limits deterin any desired manner, they are shown as being carried by a dial 54 mounted adjacent the lower end of the upper cylinder, and hence above the upper end of the lower cylinder. In the arrangement shown, the dial is supported at the lower end of a shaft 55 extending down throughthe upper cylinder, being held on said shaft by washers 56 and screw 51. The bit dial 54 is rotatable with the cylinder and is provided with radial grooves 58 in which the bits 53 are slidable in and out. If it is desired to knit terry fabric only in the heel, sole and toe portions of a sock, the

bits .53 need be provided on only one side of thedial corresponding to the sole side of the needle cylinders as shown in Fig. 3.

As illustrated in Fig. 3, the bits 53 are projected rand retracted bymeans of butts 50 enmined by said arms by providing a frictional drag between the cam and .the needle cylinder or an element rotating therewith. As shown in Fig. 3, the cam 82 is provided with a friction plate 59 pressed against the upper face of the bit dial 54 bysprings I0. Upon reversal of the direction of rotation of the needle cylinders and dial 54, the cam 62 is carried with the dial by friction plate 69 until stopped by one of said limiting arms.

In order to be able to knit non-terry fabric all around the cylinder, for example, in knitting the top or leg of a sock, provision is made for tendering the terry bits 53 inoperative. This may be accomplished by raising the bit cam 52 out of engagement with the butts 60 of the bits. In the arrangement shown in Fig. 3, cam 52 is provided with a movable section II which is raised instead of raising the whole cam. The means for raising the movable cam section from an operative position to an inoperative position is shown diagrammatically in Fig. 3 as a link I2 connected with pattern mechanism of the machine. The link 12 has a fiexiblejoint 13 to permit oscillation of cam 62 as described above; The timing is such that cam section H is raised when the bits are in retracted position. Alternatively, the bits can be rendered ineffective to produce terry loops by shifting the relative position of the thread feeding station and the point at which the bits are projected so that the bits come out too late to separate the threads.

The bits 53 serve not only to form terry loops but also to control accurate plating of the threads. As will be seen from Figs.'5 and 6, the hook of the needle engages the terry thread T first and draws apartial loop thereof over bits 53' before the body thread Bis engaged by the hook. By drawing the hit back slightly just as the hook of the needle engages the body thread the terry thread T is drawn tothe back of the hook and when stitches are drawn will form the -B. Plating can thus be accurately controlled.

The bits may be provided with notches 83 to give the bits a better purchase on the thread in controlling plating.

sole side of the cylinder is raised up out of the When needles are operated in the upper cylin-" der as occurs in knitting rib fabric, there must be provided a knocking over edge which serves the same purpose as the sinkers in the lower cylinder to engage the previously drawn stitches and cause them to be cast off when new loops are drawn by the needles. The lower edge of the upper cylinder wall ordinarily serves this function and is commonly referred to as a verge. The verge may be integral with the cylinder or may be in the form of a separate ring having needle grooves. aligned with the needle grooves of the cylinder. As the terry bits 53 are prefmeans for driving the bit dial 54 in synchronism with the needle cylinders. The height'of the dial and hence of verge section 85 can be adjusted by vertical adjustment of shaft 55 by which the dial is carried inorder to have the two sections of the verge at exactly the same level when verge section 84 is in its lower position. The adjustment of shaft 55 can also beused to change the length of the terry loops, it being understood that the length of the loops is determined by the distapce the bits are located abovethe sinkers of the erably projected at alevel above the lower edge of the Verge, in order to form long terry loops the problem arises as to how to prevent interference between the bits and the verge. Theproblem is complicated by the fact that during the knitting of the sole and instep of a sock such as that shown in Fig. 1, the terry bits must be in operative position on one side of the needle cylinder to form a terry sole, while the verge must be in operative position on the other side of the cylinder to knit a ribbed instep. In the embodiment of the invention shownin the draw- I 'is rotatable about a bearing sleeve 88 and issupported by a vertical ball bearing 81 carried by a bearing plate 88. The bearing plate is secured to the lower end of a sleeve 90 which surrounds the vertical shaft 55 carrying the bit dial 54 and bit cam 62 and extends up through the top plate of the machine where it is connected with pattern controlled mechanism for movin said sleeve vertically. Whene'the sleeve is moved to 'its upper position, the upper needle cylinder [6 and hence the attached verge section 84 on the ered so that the two sections of the verge are at the same level. It will be understood that the vertical movement of the upper needle cylinder does not affect the length of the stitches drawn, as the stitch length is controlled by the distance the needles are drawn up by'stitch cam 88 which of course does not move with the cylinder. v

The other verge section 85 is carried by the bit dial 54 and remain at a constant level. As the ends of verge section 85 abut the ends of,verge section 84 carried by the upper needle cylinder,

.the bit dial 54 is made to rotate with the cylinder.

and the -needle grooves of the verge section 85 4 and of'the cylinder are maintained in alignment;

- The split verge thus forms a simple and effective lower cylinder. In this event the vertical position of the upper needle cylinder carrying verge section 84 can also be adjusted to bring the two verge sections at the same level when knitting the top and leg.

If it is desired to knit terry all around the fabric, for example in the toe band of the sock shown in Fig. 1 instead of only on the sole half around the cylinder. It will be understood that in this event. provision must be made to avoid interference between the terry bits and the verge on the instep side of. the cylinder. This may be done by making both sections of the verge raisable preferably independently, so that in knitting the sock of Fig. 1 the verge on the sole half of the cylinder can be raised when knitting the heel and sole while the verge on the instep side is not raised until the toe band I is reached. Altematively, the verge portion of the cylinder wall may be apertured by cutting holes or notches therein so that the terry bits may come out through the cylinder wall. In some instances it may be desired to use the terry hits as a knocking over edge or verge for the upper cylinder needles, in which event the bits are manipulated so that th outer ends thereof are aligned with and substantially flush with the wall between the needle grooves of the cylinder at the knocking over point. With this arrangement the bits cooperate with the lower cylinder needles to form terry loops and cooperate with upper cylinder needles in the manner of a verge to cause previously. drawn stitches to be cast off, thus serving a dual purpose.

The steps in making an article of hosiery such as that shown in Fig. 1 will be understood .from

a brief description of the operation of the machine. The socks are preferably produced by strin work with a number of ravel courses of plain knit fabric referred to as a loopers edge between successive socks in the tring. To produce the welt or anti-ravel ed e I. alternateneedles are transferred to the upper cylinder and at least one course of 1 x 1'rib is knit, The welt cam 85 (Fig. 4) is withdrawn to render the upper cylinder needles inoperative, while a number of welt courses. for. example, four or five are knit on lower cylinder needles only. whereupon the welt cam again goes in to close the welt and the knitting of 1 x1 rib is resumed. The 1 x l rib knitting is continued until, a sufflcient length of the top port on 2 has been produced, whereupon the transfer cams 38 and 38 act on selected needles to position groups of six consecutive needles in the lower cylinder alternating with groups of three consecutive needles ,in the upper cylinder for the 6 x3 fabric of the leg. During the knitting of the welt, top and leg, the terry bits 58 remain inactive.

When the heel portion 5 is reached, a needle transfer is effected so'that on the sole side of the cylinder consecutive needles are positioned in the lower cylinder, while the needles on the instep side remain positioned for 6 x 3 rib. At

about the same time, the upper cylinder is raised to raise verge section 84 on the sole side of the cylinder, and the movable section II of bit operatingfcam 62 is lowered to operative position to cause the bits 53 to be projected outbetween the threads fed at the feeding station. Preferably one or more circular courses are knit before the needle circle begins oscillation to produce the. fashioned portion of the heel. During the oscillation of the cylinder, the needles on the instep side of the cylinder are rendered inactive by control of the switch cams 3| and 31. When the heel is completed and circular knitting resumed, the switch cams are operated to cause needles on the. instep side of the cylinder to resume knitting. During the knitting of the instep 4 and sole 6, the needles on the sole side of the 1 ,cylinder cooperate with bits 53 to produce long iterry loops of the terry thread T while'on the instep side no bits are projected, and hence the body thread B and terry thread T are knitted in plated relation. This condition is represented in Fig. 5 where it will be seen that the needles at the right hand side of the figure are producing terry fabric, while the needles at the left hand side are positioned for producing the 6 x 3' knitting of the instep. When the toe. band I is reached, all the remaining upper cylinder needles are transferred to the lower cylinder, and if it is desired to produce terry fabric all around the toe band, the bits on the instep side of the cylinder come into operation. The toe like the heel; is produced by reciprocation of the needle cylinder, using only the needles on the sole side-of the cylinder, the needles and bits on the instep side being renderedinoperative. Upon completion of the toe, all of the terry bits 53am retracted so that the machine will produce the plain knit loopers edge above referred to. Before going into the welt of the next sock, the upper cylinder and the attached section 84 of the verge are lowered to bring the two sections of the verge to the same level.

' It will be seen that the invention thus provides a novel method of producing terry fabric whereby instrumentalities located above the needle cylinder and operated independently of the sinkers are projected between the needles to separate the terry thread and body thread and 'to cooperate with the needlesflin forming long terry loops and controlling plating.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A knitted article comprising a section of terry fabric composed of body thread and terry thread, said terry thread being knit in accurate plating relation with the body thread to form terry loopson one face of the fabric and also form the opposite face of the fabric, thereby concealing the body thread.

2. A knitted article comprising a section of terry fabric and an integral section of non-terry fabric, both composed of body thread and tem thread, said terry thread being knit in accurate plating relation with said body thread to form terry loops on one face of the fabric in said terry section and also form the opposite face of the fabric in both said terry section and said nonterry section.

3. A knitted article comprising a section of terry fabric and an integral section of rib knit fabric, both composed of body thread and terry thread knit in accurate plating relation, said terry thread forming terry loops on one face of the fabric in said terry section and also forming the opposite face of the fabric in both said terry section and said rib knit section.

4. A knitted article comprising as section of terry fabric and an integral section of rib knit fabric, both composed of body thread and terry thread, said terry thread being knit to form terry loops on one face of the fabric in said terry section and said body thread being knit in accurate plating relation with the. terry thread to form the opposite face of the fabric in both said terry section and said rib knit section.

5. A knitted article comprising a section of terry fabric knit of body thread and terry thread, needle loops of said terry thread being disposed in accurate plating relation with needle loopsof said body thread, and sinker loops of said terry thread being longer than sinker loops of said body thread, and forming terry loops of the fabric, and an integral rib knit section formed of said threads knit in plating relation with corresponding loops of the respective threads substantially the same length.

6, A tubular seamless article of hosiery comprising heel, sole and toeportions composed ofa plurality'of threads knit together to form plain knit terry fabric, one of said threads being knit to form loops which are substantially longer than corresponding loops of the other thread and which constitute the terry loopsof said fabric, and integral leg and instep portions composed of the same threads knit together to form rib knit non-terry fabric in which corresponding loops of the respective threads are of substantially-the same length. r

'I. A knitted article of hosiery comprising a tubular seamless leg section composed of a plurality of threads knit together to form rib knit non-terry fabric throughout the coursewise extent of said section, an integral section composed of said threadsknit to form plain knit terry fabric throughout a part of the coursewise extent of said section to form a sole portion of said article and the same threads knit together to form rib knit non-terry fabric throughout the balance of the coursewise extent of said section to form an instep portion, and a further integral section composed of said threads knit to form plain knit terry fabric throughout the coursewise extent of said section to form a toe band portion EDGAR'W. CLARKE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2435770 *Jul 14, 1945Feb 10, 1948Interwoven Stocking CoCircular knit hosiery
US2800782 *Jul 27, 1953Jul 30, 1957Waldensian Hosiery Mills IncArgyle stocking with cushion high splice and method
US3023594 *Apr 28, 1959Mar 6, 1962Singer Fidelity IncMethod of knitting a two feed stocking
US3270526 *Jun 3, 1963Sep 6, 1966Hanes CorpRun-stop band for hosiery
US4172370 *Sep 7, 1978Oct 30, 1979Alamance Industries, Inc.Method of knitting a dress weight tube sock
US4263793 *Apr 2, 1979Apr 28, 1981Kayser-Roth Hosiery, Inc.Dress weight tube sock
US5708985 *Nov 12, 1996Jan 20, 1998Ogden & Company, Inc.Enhanced frictional engagement sock
US8250676 *Apr 5, 2010Aug 28, 2012Smartwool LlcSelectively feltable garment
US8800063 *Sep 5, 2011Aug 12, 2014Delta Galil Industries Ltd.Socks, and system and method for manufacturing socks
US8856969Aug 28, 2012Oct 14, 2014Tbl Licensing LlcSelectively feltable garment
US20110239352 *Apr 5, 2010Oct 6, 2011John RamseySelectively Feltable Garment
US20130160191 *Sep 5, 2011Jun 27, 2013Avi CohenSocks, and system and method for manufacturing socks
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/185, 66/200, 66/194, 66/188, 66/182
International ClassificationD04B1/26, D04B1/02
Cooperative ClassificationD04B9/10, D04B1/26
European ClassificationD04B1/26