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Publication numberUS2370634 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 6, 1945
Filing dateAug 13, 1943
Priority dateAug 13, 1943
Publication numberUS 2370634 A, US 2370634A, US-A-2370634, US2370634 A, US2370634A
InventorsNathaniel Brewer
Original AssigneeFischer & Porter Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotameter
US 2370634 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 6, 1945. N. BREWER 2,370,634

ROTAMETER Filed Aug. 13, 1943 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 v INVENTOR.

M01211? Brewer March 6, 194 5. I N, BREWER 2,370,634

ROTAMETER Filed Aug. 13, 1943 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 IN V EN TOR.

' Drew 2].

N. BREWER March 6, 1945.

5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Na%cr INVENTOR. Brew e2 March 6, 1945. N. BREWER 2,370,634

ROTAMETER .Filed Aug. 13, 1943 s Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR.

F'atenied Mar. 6, 1943 ROTAMETER Nathaniel Brewer, Hatfield, Pa.,v assignor to Fischer & Porter Company, Hatboro, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application August 13; 1943, Serial No. 498,444

24 Claims.

tain new and useful improvements in flow-meters of the type commonly referred to as rotameters.

An object of the present invention is to provide a rotameter which is relatively inexpensive and which is adapted quickly and easily to be assembled and disassembled. Another object of the present invention is to provide a rotameter which is adapted for universal" connection within a. pipe-line or the likeand which, more particularly, can be installed in any horizontal pipeline without any special fittings or adaptors, regardless of the angular relationship between the inlet and outletsides of the horizontal pipe-line. An additional object of the present invention is to provide a rotameter having adjustable fluidsealing means being quickly and easily adjustable from the outside of the rotameter. A further object of this invention is to provide an enclosed rotameter, the outer removable casing of which serves to hold the heads" in aligned vertically-spaced relationship with "each of the "heads horizontally rotatably adjustable.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention are apparent in the following detailed description, appended claims, and accompanying drawings.

For the purpose of illustrating the invention, there are shown in the accompanying drawings forms thereof which are at present preferred, since the same having been found in practice to give satisfactory and reliable results, although it is understood that the various instrumentalities of which the invention consists can be variously arranged and organized and that the invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and organizations of the instrumentalities as herein shown and described.

In the accomp y g drawings in which like reference characters indicate like parts throughout:

Figure 1 represent: a perspective view 01' one embodiment of the present invention as its?- pears in use.

Figure 2 represents a vertical cross-sectional view generally along the line of 2-2 of Figure 3 of the embodiment of Figure 1.

Figure 3 represents a horizontal cross-sectional view generally along the line 3-4 .01 Figure 2. Figure 4 represents a. perspective view of the embodiment of Figure l as it appears when partly disassembled.

Figure 5 represents a perspective view of the embodiment of Figure 1 illustrating the manner in which the top and bottom fittings can be adjusted to any horizontal angle.

Figure 6 represents a front elevational view of another embodiment of the present invention.

Figure 7 represents a perspective view of one of the structural members forming part of the embodiment of Figure 6. I

Figure 8 represents a perspective view of a modified form of the embodiment of Figures 1 to 5 in which two rotameter metering tubes are enclosed side by side in a single unit.

Figure 9 represents a perspective view of the housing elements forming part of the embodiment of Figure 8.

Figure 10 represents a perspective view of an intermediate structural element adapted for use with elements of the character shown in Figure '7 for mounting two or more metering tubes side by side.

Figure 11 represents a perspective view of a spacer element which may be used in place of the intermediate structural element shown in Figure 10.

In one embodiment of the present invention shown generally in Figures 1 to 5, a tapered transparent metering tube III of glass or other suitable material is adapted to be vertically mounted between upper and lower metallic "heads or fittings II and I2 respectively. An apertured metering float I3 is slidably mounted upon a guide-rod it which extends generally axially of the metering tub and which is supported by upper and lower spiders l5 and i6; spiders I5 and It being connected to the guide-rod M at their centers by nuts I! and being supp rted at their outer ends by the ends of the metering tube Ill.

The float I3 is provided with a generally cylindrical vertically-extending body portion I8 and a thin transversely-extending disc-like flow-constricting head portion ll; the diameter of the head portion it being approximately the same l3 rises, the greater the rate-of-flow, the greater the rise of the float it within the tube Ill. The position of the float it within the tube Ill indicates the rate-of-flow of the fluid in a manner wellknownin'theart.

'l'hemeteringtubeandfloatshowninthe drawings are not thesubiect oi the present invention and are merely illustrative; other forms of metering tubes and metering floats being equally usable with the rotameter construction of the present invention.

The fittings H and I2 include vertically-extending apertured necks 20 and 2| respectively; stufllng boxes 22 and 23 being provided within the necks 28 and 2| and being adapted to receive and to hold the ends of the metering tube H1 in fluid-tight relationship as will be described hereinbelow.

The heads II and H are provided with internally screw-threaded side openings 24 and 25 respectively which are adapted screw-threadedly to engage with the pipe-line in which the rotameter is to be connected; the opening 25 in the lower head'l2 serving as th inlet opening of the rotameter and being adapted for connection to the inlet pipe-line l4 and the opening 24 in the upper head l| serving as the outlet opening of the rotameter and being adapted for connection to the outlet pipe-line 13.

The heads H and I2 are also provided with internally screw-threadedly vertical openings 26 and 21 respectively; the vertical openings 26 and 21 being disposed in alignment with the apertured necks 28 and 2|.

Apertured adaptors 28 and 29 are provided for the openings 26 and 21 respectively; the adaptors 28 and 29 being externally screw-threaded at their inner ends as at 38 and 3| respectively whereby they can be removably connected within the internally screw-threaded openings 26 and 21. Upper and lower gaskets 32 and 33 provide fluid-tight seals intermediate the adaptors 28 and 29 and the openings 26 and 21.

The adaptors 28 and 29 are internally screwthreaded at their outer ends as at 34 and 35 respectively and are adapted to receive either the closure plugs 36 and 31 or the pipe-line. That is, when the rotameter is to be connected into a horizontal pipe-line, the lines 13 and 14 are connected to the side openings 24 and 25 and the plugs 36 and 31 are inserted within the adaptors 28 and 29. When, on the other hand, the totemeter is to be inserted within a vertical pipeline, the lines 13 and 14 are connected within the internally screw-threaded openings 34 and 35 of the adaptors 28 and 29 while the plugs 36 and 31 are used to close 01! the side openings 24 and 25 of the heads II and I2. It is apparent that either of the-plugs 36 or 31 can be shifted to accommodate a piping arrangement in which the inlet pipe-line is horizontal and the outlet pipeline is vertical and vice versa.

The rotameter is provided with a metallic outer casing or housing made up of a pair of laterally-disposed vertically-extending matching sections 38 and 39. The housing sections may be of pressed sheet-metal or may be cast or otherwise formed and may have an inner coating 01' white enamel to facilitate reading of the rotameter. The sheet-metal for said housing sections should preferably be thick enough to be rigid (so that the heads II and I2 will be maintained in rigid vertical alignment thereby) but thin enough to permit them to be formed by conventional sheetmetal bending, shearing, punching and other forming operations. v

The section 38 is provided with inwardly-extending split-rings 48-01 and 4|a, adjacent the top and bottom ends thereof respectively. The section 39 is provided with similar inwardly-extending split-rings 48-h and "-12 adjacent the 1 top and bottom ends thereof respectively. The

split-rings may be welded or otherwise attached to the housing sections or may be formed integrally therewith.

Annular grooves 44 and 45 are formed on the outside of the necks 28 and 2| respectively. The grooves 44 and 45 are adapted to receive the splitrings 48-a and 4|lb and 4|-a and "-1; when the sections 38 and 39 are fitted together.

Upper and lower stufling glands 46 and 41 are provided for the stuffing boxes 22 and 23 respectively and are adapted to compress upper and lower packing rings 48 and 49 to provide fluidtight seals between the ends of the metering tube In and the upper and lower heads II and I2.

Th glands 46 and 41 are provided with annu lar flanges 58 and 5| respectively which extend laterally beyond the necks 28 and 2|.

A plurality (as for example four) of circumferentially distributed notches 52 are provided at the outer edge of the flange 58 and similar notches 53 are provided in the flange 5|.

A plurality (as for example two in each) of openings '54 are provided in the upper split-rings 48a and 48b and similar openings 55 are provided in the lower split-rings 4|--a and 4|b. The openings 54 are in alignment with the notches 52 while the opening 55 are in alignment with the notches 53.

A pair of draw bars '56 are disposed underneath the flange 58 adjacent the outer edge thereof, and similar draw bars '51 are disposed on top oi the flange 5|.

Each of the draw bars 56 has a pair of internally screw-threaded openings 58 adjacent the ends thereof, while each of the draw bars 51 is provided with similar openings 59.

The openings 68 are somewhat smaller than, and in alignment with, the notches 62" and the openings 54 and the openings 59 are similarly related to the notches 53 and openings 55.

A plurality (as for example four) 01' bolts 68 are adapted to pass downwardly through the openings 54 in the split-rings 48-41 and 48b and are adapted screw-threadedly to engage with the openings 58 in the draw bar 56 as shown particularly in Figure 4. Similar bolts 6| extend upwardly through the openings 55 and engage with the openings 59 in the draw bars 51.

The bolts 60 are provided with enlarged heads 62 which rest against the top side of the splitrings 48-11 and 48-12. The bolts 6| are provided with similar heads 63 which rest against the bottom side of the split-rings' 4|iz' and 4l-b. I

The heads 62 are provided with polygonal sockets 64 while similar sockets 65 are provided on the heads 63. The sockets 64 and 65'are adapted to receive a po ygonal-headed turning tool 66 for rotating the bolts 68 and 6|.

One of the casing sections, as .for examplethe section 38, may be provided with elongated removable front and back windows 61 of glass or synthetic plastic or other suitable transparent material to allow reading of the position of the metering float l3 within the tube In. The other casing section 39 is notched as at 42 to receive the windows 61.

A capacity scale 68 may be supported from the inside or the casing in any suitable manner, as for example by being removably fastened to the support 43, and may be disposed adjacent the metering tube I so that the position of the metering float l3 can be read of! against the capacity scale 68. The scale 68 may be calibrated directly in units of rate-ot-flow, as for example asraoaa lars 89 and 18 and engage in corresponding upper gallons per minute, or it may be calibrated merely as an arbitrary scale, from the reading or which the rate-of-fiow can be determined by reference to a suitable calibration table or chart.

The scales may be made interchangeable to indicate different flow-rates with different metering tubes and/or floats.

Instead of employing a separate capacity scale as shown in Figures 1, 4 and 5 oi. the drawings, it is possible to apply the calibrations directly to the metering tube It by etching or otherwise, as is well known in the art.

The method of assembling the rotameter of the present invention will now be described.

The float l8, the guide-rod I4, and the spiders l5 and I8 are first assembled within the metering tube III by tightening of the nuts l1, so that the metering tube and float form a more or less integral unit which can be inserted and removed as such from the rest of the rotameter.

The packing rings 48 and 48 have the same outside diameter so that they can fit into the stuffing boxes 22 or 23; the upper and lower heads II and I2 being identical and changeable.

The upper packing rings 48 are first slipped 25 over the metering tube I8 from the bottom and moved to position adjacent the upper end of the tube; the inside diameter of the rings 48 being substantially the same as the outside diameter of the upper end of the tube l8.

The upper stuffing gland 48 is then slipped over the tube l8 and the lower stufllng gland 41 is next put on. The lower packing rings 49 are next placed in position at the lower end of the tube 18; the rings 49 having an inside diameter substantially the same as the outside diameter of the ring l8.

The collars 59 and 18 are placed over the necks 28 and 2| respectively and the heads II and I2 tube 8 so that the stufilng boxes 22 and 23 enclose the packing rings 48 and 49 respectively. It should be noted thatthe rings 48 and 49 have the same outside diameter so that they will fit into either of heads II and I2 which are identical and interchangeable. v The bolts 88 .are then inserted through the openings 54 and are engaged within the opening 58 of the draw bars 58 and are given a few turns by the tool 88 loosely to connect the draw 50 bars to the split-rings 48-a and 48b. The

lower bolts 6| are then similarly inserted through the openings and are connected within the opening 59 in the draw-bars 51' loosely to connect the draw bars to the split-rings 4|a and 55 7 other to encircle the grooved heads II and I2 and to maintain the necks 28 and 2| in spaced vertical alignment.

The upper and lower collars 89 and 18 are then moved inwardly and are fitted over the ends of the matching sections 38 and 89 to hold the sections together. Upper and lower screws 1| and 12 pass through op nings 18 and 18 in the col- .are then placed upon the ends of the metering 40 and lower 1 internal screw-threaded openings 11-0 and 11-11 and 18-0 and 18-1) in the casing sections to lock the collars upon the matching sections.

The collars 89 and 18 are provided with notches 1s-a and 88-a through which the heads 92 and 83 oi! the bolts 88 and 8| can be reached by the turnin tool 88.

When the bolts 88 and 8| are untightened, it can be seen that the upper and lower heads are freely rotatable within the split-rings 48 and 4| of the casing sections.

The upper and lower heads I l and I2 are then rotated to the exact angle required to receive the outlet and inlet pipe-lines 13 and 14. The pipelines 13 and 14 are then connected within the openings 24 and 25 of the heads II and I2.

After the pipe-lines have been connected within the openings 24 and 25, the bolts 88 and 8| are tightened to pull the draw bars 56 and 51 and I to tighten the stufllng glands 48 and 41. The upper and lower collars 89 and") are then moved inwardly and connected to the casing by the bolts 1| and 12, as described above.

It can be seen that the heads 62 and 83 of the bolts 88 and 8| are easily accessible for tightening of the screws 88 and GI.

Thus, the systematic tightening of the stufiing glands which is required from time to time in order to maintain a fluid-tight seal between the ends of the metering tube l8 and the heads I! and I2 can be effected quickly and easily by means of the turning tool 88 without any danger of breakage of the frangible metering tube which is enclosed and protected by the casing.

,Where the rotameter is to be connected within a. vertical pipe-line, the procedure is generally the same as described hereinabove in connection with the installation in a horiz'ontal pipe-line, except that the closure plugs 38 and 31 are transferred to the side openings 24 and 25 and the pipe-line is connected at 34 and 35. In this case, while, of course, rotation of the heads ii and I2 is not necessary to match with the pipe-line, such rotation may be desirable in order to effect the final screw-threaded attachment of the pipe-line at 34 and 35, particularly where, for any reason, it is impractical or undesirable to rotate the pipe-line to effect the connection.

After the pipe-line has been connected at 34 and 35, bolts 88 and 8| are tightened as described hereinabove.

In disassembling the rotameter from the pipeline, the steps described hereinabove are carried out in inverse order.

It is possible to open the casing by removing only one of the casing-sections whereupon the heads and the metering tube are still supported in alignment by the other section.

Another embodiment of the present invention is shown in Figures 6 and 7. The embodiment of Figures 6 and '1 is generally the same as the embodiment of Figures 1 to 5 except that, in place of the casing sections 38 and 39, a pair of identical structural elements 19 are employed to hold the heads II and I2 in spaced vertically aligned relationship.

The elements 19 are provided with split rings 48 and 4|, bolts 88 and 8|, and draw bars 58 and 51, all identical with those heretofore described. However, the elements 19, instead of enclosing the metering tube l8, merely have side columns 88 wllzich serve rigidly to support the heads I and This modification is desirable where no external protection is required for the metering tube. The metering tube shown in Figure 6 has the capacity graduations applied directly to the glass in place of the separate scale 68 of Figures 1, 4 and 5.

Another modification of the present invention is shown in Figures 8 and 9 and is adapted for mounting two or more rotameter tubes side by side in an enclosed casing.

The embodiment is generally similar to that of Figures '1 to 5, having the same type metering tubes and having the same casing sections 88 and 88.

However, an intermediate section 8| is also employed to accommodate an extra metering tube.

The section 8| is provided with a pair of oppositely-extending split-rings 82 and 83 at the tip thereof and similar split-rings 84 and 88 at the bottom. Bolts 88 and 6| and draw bars 88 and 81, similar to those previously described are provided for each of the split-rings 82, 88, 84 and 88.

The section 8| is provided with windows 61 at one side thereof (to fit into the notches 42 of the end section 38) and notches 42 at the other side thereof (to receive the windows 61 of the other end section 88).

The split-rings 82 and 84 match with the rings 48--a and 4la of the section 88, while the rings 84 and 85 match with rings 48-!) and 4|-b of the section 88 to support and enclose the two metering tubes.

Two-hole collars 88 and 81 are adapted to fit over the entire assembly and to be connected to the end sections 88 and 38 by'the screws II and I2 as heretofore described, to tie the assembly together.

It can be seen, particularly in Figure -8, that the present construction can be adapted for connection to horizontal inlet and outlet pipe-lines regardless of their angular relationship.

It is apparent that three or more metering tubes can be installed side by side in the manner shown in Figure 8 by simply adding an additional intermediate section 8| for each additional tube and by employing top and bottom collars having the required number of head openings.

It is also apparent that the structural elements 18 of Figures 6 and 7 can also be adapted to hold two or more tubes by using an intermediate section 88 shown in Figure for each extra tube.

The section 88 is generally like the section 8| of Figure 9 except that it has a vertical structural column 88 intermediate the top and bottom splitrings.

In place of the section 88 shown in Figure 10, it is possible to employ simply top and bottom spacer elements 88 which have oppositely-extending split-rings 8| and 82 similar to those of Figure 10 but which do not have any vertical column intermediate the heads.

The spacer elements 80 may be providedwith front and back screw-threaded openings 88 whereby they may be bolted to the top and bottom collars to derive support therefrom, elements similar to 88 being employed.

The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential attributes thereof, and it is therefore desired that the present embodiments be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, reference being had to the appended claims rather than to the foregoing description to indicate the scope of the invention.

Having thus described the invention, what I claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Pateat, is:

l. A rotameter comprising a vertical metering tube having a movable metering float therein, separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of said tube, each of said fittings having an opening for connection to a pipe-line, the axes of said openings being horizontal, means providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and said tube, an outer casing separably positioned about said tube, and means rotatably connecting each of said fittings to said casing whereby said fittings are supported in rigid vertically-spaced alignment and whereby each of said fittings is independently rotatably adjustable to permit universal positioning of its connection opening throughout a horizontal plane and around the axis of said metering tube.

2. A rotameter comprising a vertical metering tube having a movable metering float therein, separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of said tube, each of said-fittings having an opening for connection to a pipe-line, the axes of said openings being horizontal, means providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings said casing.

'3. A rotameter comprisin a vertical metering tube having a movable metering float therein, separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of said tube, each of said fittings having an opening for connection to a pipe-line, the axes of said openings being horizontal, means providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and said tube, a laterally removable frame rigidly supporting said fittings in verticallyspaced alignment, and means permitting independent rotational adjustment of each of said fittings relative to said frame and to said metering tube, whereby the connection opening of each of said fittings can be universally positioned throughout a horizontal plane and around the axis of said metering tube.

4. A rotameter comprising a vertical metering tube having a movable metering fioat therein, separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of said tube, each of said fittings having an opening for connection to a pipe-line, the axes of said openings being horizontal,- means including a striding-gland providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and said tube, a frame rigidly supporting said fittings in vertically-spaced alignment, means permitting independent rotational adjustment of each of said fittings relative to said frame and to said metering tube, whereby the connection opening of each of said fittings can be universally positioned throughout a horizontal plane and around the axis of said metering tube, and means for adjusting each of said sealing means, said adjusting means being operable from the outside of said frame and including a bolt rotatably mounted in said frame with its head on the outside thereof and a yoke screw-threadedly mounted upon said bolt, said yoke bearing against said stufiing-gland and being adapted to tighten said stufiing-gland when said bolt is turned.

5. A rotameter comprisingan elongated vertically-extending tapered transparent metering tubehaving an axially movable metering float therein, separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of said tube, each of said fittings having an opening for connection to a pipeline, the axes of said openings being horizontal, means providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and said tube, an outer casing separably positioned about said metering tube, said casing having an elongated window therein to permit observation of the position of said float within said tube. and means rotatably the ends of said tube, each of said fittings hav-- ing an opening for connection to a pipe-line, the axes of said openings being horizontal, means providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and said tube, an outer casing made up of a pair of vertically-extending laterally-dis posed matching sections of metal or the like removably positioned about said tube, and means rotatably connecting each of said fittings to said casing whereby said fittings are supported in rigid vertically-spaced alignment and whereby each of said fittings is independently rotatably adjustable to permit universal positioning of its connection opening throughout a horizontal plane and around the axis of said metering tube.

'7. A rotameter comprising a vertical metering.

fittings and said tube, a vertically split outer casing removably positioned about said tube, and means rotatably connecting each of said fittings to said casing whereby said fittings are supported in rigidvertically-spaced alignment and whereby each of said fittings is independently rotatably adjustable to permit universal positioning of its connection opening throughout a horizontal plane and around the axis of said metering tube;

8. A rotameter comprising a vertical metering tube having a movable metering float therein, separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of said tube, each of said fittings having an opening for connection to a pipe-line, the axes of said openings being horizontal, means providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and said tube. a frame rigidly supporting said fittings in-vertically-spaced alignment, said frame compri'irg a. pair of elongated vertically-extending lateral'y -:lisposed members of metal or the like, and means permitting independent rotational adfustment of each ofsaid fittings relative tosaicl frame and to said metering tube, whereby the ozone etion opening of each of said fittings can be universally positioned throughout a horizontal plane and around the axis of said metering tube.

9. A rotameter comprising a vertical metering tube having a movable metering float therein, separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of said tube, each of said fittings having an opening for connection to a pipe-line, the axes of said openings being horizontal, means providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and said tube, a vertically-split removable frame rigidly supporting said fittings in vertically-spaced alignment, and means permitting independent rotational adjustment of each of said fittings relative to said frame and to said metering tube, whereby the connection opening of each of said fittings can be universally positioned throughout a horizontal plane and around the axis of said metering tube.

10. A rotameter comprising a vertical metering tube having a movable metering float therein, separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of said tube. each of said fittings having an opening for connection to a pipe-line, the axes of said openings being horizontal, means providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and said tube, a casing made up of a pair or vertically-extending laterally-disposed matching sections of metal or the like, removably p0- sitioned about said tube, means holding said laterally-disposed sections together comprising a pair of collars fitting over the matching ends of said sections and detachably secured to each of said sections, and means rotatably connecting each of said fittings to said casing whereby said fittings are supported in rigid vertically-spaced alignment and whereby each of said fittings is independently rotatably adjustable to permit universal positioning of its connection opening throughout a horizontal plane and around the axis of said metering tube.

11. A rotameter comprising a vertical metering tube having a movable metering float therein, separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of said tube, each of said fittings having an opening for connection to a pipe-line, the axes of said openings being horizontal, means providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and said tube, a frame rigidly supporting said fittings in vertically-spaced alignment, said frame comprising a pair of separate elongated vertically-extending laterally-disposed members of metal or the like detachably connected to each other at their ends, and means permitting independent rotational adjustment of each of said fittings relative to said frame and to said metering tube, whereby the connection opening of each of said fittings can be universally positioned throughout a horizontal plane and around the axis of said metering tube.

l2. A multiple rotameter unit for measuring the rates of-flow in a plurality of pipe-lines or the like comprising a plurality of vertical laterally adjacent metering tubes having metering floats therein, separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of each tube, each of said fittings having an opening for connection to a pipe-line, the axes of said openings being horizontal, means providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and its tube, an outer casing removably positioned about said tubes, and means rotatably connecting each of said fittings to said casing whereby each pair of fittings is rigidly supported in spaced vertical alignment and whereby each of said fittings is independently rotatably adjustable to permit universal positioning of its connection opening throughout a horizontal plane and around the axis of its tube.

' 13. A multiple rotameter unit for measuring the rates-of-fiow in a plurality of pipe-lines or the like comprising a plurality of vertical laterally adjacent metering tubes having metering floats therein, separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of each tube, each of said fittings having an opening for connection to a pipe-line, the axes of said openings being horizontal, means providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and its tube, a frame rigidly supporting said pairs of fittings in vertically-spaced alignment, and means permitting independent rotational adjustment of each of said fittings relative to said frame and to its the rates-of-flow in a plurality of pipe-lines or the like comprising a plurality of vertical laterally adjacent metering tubes having metering floats therein, separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of each tube, each of said fittings having an opening for connection to a pipe-line, the axes of said openings being horizontal, means providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and its tube, an outercasing removably positioned about said tubes, said casing including vertically-split end sections of metal or the like and a matching section intermediate each pair of tubes and connecting means detachably securing said sections, and means rotatably connecting each of said fittings to said casing whereby each pair of fittings is rigidly supported in spaced vertical alignment and whereby each of said fittings is independently rotatably adjustable to permit universal positioning of its connection opening throughout a horizontal plane and around the axis of its tube.

15. A multiple rotameter unit for measuring the rates-of-fiow in a plurality of pipe-lines or the like comprising a plurality of vertical laterally adjacent metering tubes having metering'fioats therein, separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of each tube, each of said fittings having an opening for connection to a pipe-line, the axes of said openings being horizontal, means providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and its tube, a frame rigidly supporting said pairs of fittings in vertically-spaced alignment, said frame including separate vertically-extending end structural elements of metal or the like and a separate matching spacer element intermediate each pair of tubes and connecting means detachably securing said structural elements and said spacer element, and means permitting independent rotational adjustment of each of said fittings relative to said frame and to its metering tube, whereby the connection opening of each of said fittings can be universally positioned throughout a horizontal plane and around the axis of its metering tube.

16. In a rotameter having a vertical metering tube, a metering float adapted for up-anddown movement within said tube, and separate upper and lower fittings disposed in fluid-tight sealing relationship at the ends of said tube; an outer casing made up of a pair of vertically-extending sections of sheet-metal removably positioned about said tube, and means connecting .each of said fittings to said casing whereby said fittings are supported in rigid vertically-spaced alignment, said connecting r'neans including a roove formed in each of said fittings, tongues formed at the ends of said casing and adapted to fit within said grooves, and collars positioned about the ends of the casing sections and detachably secured thereto.

17. In a rotameter having a vertical metering tube, a metering float adapted for up-and-down movement within said tube, and separate upper and lower fittings disposed in fluid-tight sealing relationship at the ends of said tube; a frame made up of a pair of vertically-extending laterally-disposed supporting members, and means connecting each of said fittings to said frame, said connecting means including a groove formed in each of said fittings, tongues formed at the ends of said frame and adapted to fit within said grooves, and collars adapted to pass over said fittings and to enclose the ends of said supporting members.

18. In a rotameter having a vertical metering tube, a metering float adapted for up-and-down movement within said tube, and separate upper and lower fittings disposed in fluid-tight sealing relationship at the ends of said tube; a frame made up of a pair of vertically-extending laterally-disposed supporting members, and means connecting each of said fittings to said frame whereby said fittings are supported in rigid vertically-spaced alignment, said connecting means including tongue and-groove connections between the ends of said supporting members and each of said fittings, and a collar adapted to pass over each of said fittings and to enclose the ends of said supporting members.

19. In a rotameter having a vertical metering tube, a movable metering fioat disposed within said tube, upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of said tube and adapted for connection to a pipe-line, and each having a stuffing-box, a packing ring and a stufiing-gland for providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and said tube; a frame connecting said fittings and supporting them in rigid vertically-spaced alignment. and means for adjusting said stuflingglands, said adjusting means including bolts rotatably mounted at the ends of said frame with their heads accessible from the outside thereof, and yokes screw-threadedly mounted upon said bolts and bearing against said stufling-glands whereby rotation of said bolts will cause tightening of said stuffing-glands.

20. In a rotameter having a vertical metering tube. a movable metering fioat disposed within said tube, upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of said tube and adapted for connection to a pipe-line, and each having a stufiing-box, a

packing ring and a stufiing-gland for providing a fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and said tube; a frame connecting said fittings and supporting them in rigid vertically-spaced alignment, and means'for adjusting saidstufiingglands, said adjusting means including transversely-extending notched flanges formed at the outer ends of said stuifing-glands, bolts rotatably mounted at the ends of said frame with their heads accessible from the outside. thereof, and yokes screw-threadedly mounted upon said bolts and bearing against said stuffing-glands whereby rotation of said bolts will cause tightening of said stufling-glands, said bolts passing through the notches of the stuffing-gland flanges.

21. In a rotameter having a vertical metering tube, a metering float adapted for up-and-down movement within said tube, and separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of said tube, each of said fittings "having a stufllng-box and a stufllng-gland for providing a fluid-tight seal with said tube; a, frame including a pair of vertically-extending laterally-disposed supporting members, an annular groove formed on each of said fittings, split-rings formed at the ends of said supporting members and adapted to engage within said grooves, collars adapted to pass over said fittings and to enclose the ends of said supporting members thereby to lock said supporting members in position to support said fittings in rigid vertically-spaced alignment, and means for adjusting the fluid-tight seal intermediate each of said fittings and said tube, said adjusting means including bolts rotatably mounted in said split-rings with their heads exposed for operation on the outer sides thereof, and yokes screwthreadedly mounted upon said bolts and engaging said stufling-glands whereby rotation of' said bolts will cause tightening of said stufllng-glands.

22. In a rotameter having a vertical metering tube, a metering float adapted for up-and-down movement within said tube, and separate upper and lower fittings disposed at the ends of said tube, each of said fittings having a stufllng-box and a stufiing-gland for providing a fluid-tight seal with said tube; a frame including a pair of vertically-extending laterally-disposed supporting members, an annular groove formed in each of said fittings, split-rings formed at the ends of said supporting members and adapted to engage within said annular grooves, collars adapted to pass over each of said fittings and to enclose the ends of said supporting members thereby to lock said supporting members in position to support said fittings in rigid vertically-spaced alignment, and means for adjusting the fluid-tight seal intermed-late said fittings and said tube, said adlusting means including bolts rotatably mounted in said split-rings with their heads exposed for operation on the outer sides thereof, and yokes screw-threadedly mounted upon said bolts and engaging said stufling-glands whereby rotation of said bolts will cause tightening of said stufiingglands, said collars having openings therein to permit insertion of a bolt-tightening tool.

23. In a multiple rotameter unit adapted to measure the rates-of-flow in a, plurality of pipelines and having a plurality of vertical laterallyadjacent metering tubes, metering floats movably disposed within said tubes, separate upper and lower fittings disposed in fluid-tight sealing relationship at the ends of said tubes, each of said fittings having an opening for connection to a pipe-line; an .outer casing removably positioned about said tubes, said casing including verticallysplit end sections of metal or the like, a matching section intermediate each pair of tubes, and means detachably connecting each of said fittings to the ends of said sections thereby to hold said fittings in rigid vertically-spaced alignment, said connecting means including tongue-and-groove connections intermediate said fittings and said sections.

24. In a multiple rotameter unit adapted to measure the rates-offiow in a plurality of pipelines and having a plurality of vertical laterallyadjacent metering tubes, metering floats movably disposed within said tubes, separate upper and lower fittings disposed in fluid-tight sealing relationship at the ends of said tubes, each of said fittings having an opening for connection to a pipeline; a frame rigidly supporting said fittings in vertically-spaced alignment, said frame including separate vertically-extending structural end elements, 9. separate matching spacer element intermediate each pair of tubes, and means detachably connecting said fittings to the ends of saidstructural and spacer elements, said connecting means including tongue-and-groove connections intermediate said fittings and said elements.

NATHANIEL BREWER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2417352 *Jun 19, 1944Mar 11, 1947Cox Claude EFlowmeter
US2643546 *Dec 6, 1949Jun 30, 1953Schutte & Koerting CoProtective cage structure for tubular gauges
US2799352 *Jun 18, 1953Jul 16, 1957Nat Foam System IncApparatus for proportioning fire extinguishing foam solutions
US2850897 *Jun 24, 1955Sep 9, 1958Bell & Gossett CoFlow meter with conical spring restriction
US2858697 *Apr 26, 1954Nov 4, 1958 entwistle
US3181358 *Oct 12, 1962May 4, 1965Fischer & Porter CoFlowmeter
US3490284 *Jun 20, 1967Jan 20, 1970Rheometron Gmbh FaFlowmeter with removable measuring tube
US4173890 *Oct 18, 1978Nov 13, 1979Gilmont Instruments, Inc.By-pass flowmeter
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US5507190 *Aug 9, 1994Apr 16, 1996Cole-Parmer Instrument CompanyFlowmeter with improved end stops
Classifications
U.S. Classification73/861.55, 73/201
International ClassificationG01F1/22, G01F1/20
Cooperative ClassificationG01F1/22
European ClassificationG01F1/22