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Publication numberUS2371006 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 6, 1945
Filing dateMar 8, 1943
Priority dateMar 8, 1943
Publication numberUS 2371006 A, US 2371006A, US-A-2371006, US2371006 A, US2371006A
InventorsWeaver Jesse M
Original AssigneeRaybestos Manhattan Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil burner wick
US 2371006 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 6, 1945. J7 M WEAVER 2,371,006

' CIL BURNER WICK Filed March 8, 1945 1i, umnmmulumn um l t? IM NIMH Patented Mar. 6, 1945 on. BURNER WICK Jesse M. Weaver, Charlston, S. C.,- assignor to` Raybestos-Manhattan, Inc., Passaic, N. J., va. corporation of New Jersey Application March 8, 1943,'-Serial No.l 478,486

13 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in wicks of the type adapted for use in oil burners, and more particularly to wicks formed entirely of asbestos material. Such wicks have been extensively used and one of the important reasons for the wide acceptance of such wick constructions is due primarily to the non-combustible nature of asbestos by virtue of which the wicks do not char, and thus eliminate the necessity of trimming for` purposes of maintaining yan even flame.

More specically my improved asbestos wick construction is of the type comprising a plurality of laminations of asbestos paper secured together as a unit. Wicks of this general type have heretofore been proposed but have not been found entirely satisfactory because of the short term of good performance and because they become "cemented in the channel of the oil burner base or receptacle, by salts, starches, etc., that boil over in the process of cooking.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide an improved Wick formed of a plurality of laminations of hard and dense asbestos paper stock and soft, porous asbestos felt, and wherein said wick is constructed in a mannerto provide high capillary action for feeding of the oil to the area of vaporization and combustion.

Another object is to provide an improved wick formed of a plurality of laminations of asbestos and wherein one lamination has higher and more rapid capillary action than the other or others for quickly feeding fuel oil to the upper edge of the wick in proper quantity to effect quick and thorough Vvaporization with minimum carbon for'Y mation and coking.

A further object is to provide an improved, laminated asbestos paper wick which may be readily bent, without danger of rupturing o1'l breaking, for ttinginto the annular channe'l of the burner base or wick receptacle.

A still further object is to provide an improved,

laminated asbestos paper` wick which is preformed as a flat strip, so as to lend itself to convenient packaging and shipment, in strip form or when coiled into a roll, and which may be readily bent to fit the Wick receptacle without danger of rupturing or'breaking.

And still another object is to provide an improved laminated asbestos paper wick having one or more laminations of felted asbestos having crimped or rippled surfaces for obtaining a high degree of capillary action for rapidly feeding an adequate quantity oi' oil to the area of vaporization and combustion.

respectively on Fig. 10. v i Fig. 13 isa sectional view of a still further 'modi-y iication of my improved asbestospaper wick. In oil burners of the hydrocarbon blue flame"` type designed especially for consumption of kero' Still anotherobject is to provide van improved f laminated asbestosy paper Wick wherein one or more of said laminations is crimped, rippled, iluted or corrugated, and which permits ready `bending of the wick .to t a burner base or wick receptacle without danger of rupturing or break-A ing.'

Other objects and advantages of this inven-f" tion Will be apparent from the following descrip- .tion taken in connection with `the 'accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is a face view of an improved asbestos*4 paper vwick construction embodying theA present I invention.

A Figs. 2 and 3 are vertical and transverse A's ec-,` tions through the Wick, takeny substantially as indicated at lines y2---2 and'3-,3 respectively on Fig. 1. t

Fig. 4 is a face View of a modified form Atos paper wick. Figs. 5 and 6 are verticaljand transverse sec-y" tions, taken substantially as indicated at lines 5-5 and -respectively on Fig. 4.A

Fig. 7 is av face view ofv another modifiedforrriy of my improved `asbestos paper Wick. y

Figs. 8 and 9 are sectional views, taken substantially as indicated at lines 8-8 and 9-9 respectively on Fig. '7.

Fig. 10 is a face view of a further modication f of my improved asbestos paper Wick.

.Figs 11 and .12 are sectional views, taken as substantially indicated at lines II-Il and I 2,-l2

sene, the kerosene in liquid form is consumed for only a few minutes after ignition each time the burner is operated. Duringthis initial period y the kerosene is consumed on the edge of, the..A

wick and the fire burns as a yellow flame, and

serves to heat the sheet metal shells which form the combustion chamber. The heat from,l

the combustion chamber is conducted to the Wick and the metal burner base or Wick receptacle,

causing heat to radiate to the` face of the wick,

which results in vaporizing the kerosene. The vaporized kerosene rises and admixes with the air drawn into the combustion chamber through the periorations in the Walls thereof and the admix# ture then burns as a blue flame.

Such burners are so constructed as Vto control the fuel for `maintaining a relatively uniform orl constant level. The wick and its retaining `reof ashes-Q leys `eeptacle are lowered so that kerosene will flow laminations II and I9, which with the soft nature into the receptacle and eiect saturation of the of the felt provides adequate capillary actlonfor 1 wick, and then the receptacle is raised to dispose supplying the necessary quantity of fuel to the the wick to a desired height at which the flame upper edge of the wick. It may be understood I lis to be held. The flame is controlled by the 5 that the laminations I1 and I9 may be corruamount of vapor produced and this is detergated prior to assembly with the intermediate mined by the quantity of kerosene admitted to 1 lamination or may be corrugated after assembly eepteeie isiiow'eiedififerlfiews ifiisttheiensnnei Inetiieeeestiiuetion iuiistrlste'd inr'figsri to 9 thereof to a depth of about l/8 of an inch or less, 10 of the drawing, the wick indicated at 24 repre- `and the capillary action of the wick feeds theff ,Jsn'ts my preferred construction and is composed fuel to the top edge ofthe wick. This actionmay. of.three .rplies or laminations of asbestos paper i be fast or slow depending upon the chartstk, designated as 25, 26 and 2'I. The ply 25 istics of the wick material employed? 'isfpreferably'f'formedeof a relatively dense, hard In its broad aspect this invention isdrtedll asbestosfpperiwhicl possesses a high degree of to a nove1 wick construction "composed of twee' f resistaueeftofeimpa'irment of' its surface, due t0 or more laminations of asbestos-paper stock its rigideconstruction and firmness, and insures 1 which may be secured together in any oneo'f a; ge't"stability"thn other types of asbestos number of different satisfactory convei'iiiiorlal paper-'sund'er the disintegratng effects 0f a flame,

mannersand .where in.atleast oneofthe laminae 20 andhlso .serves to transmit heat to the laminag tionsisfprovi'dediwitlridged'srfcsll lowdepth alternate elevations.andfvallys' The" and,21 are secured togetherelongthe longits It ifdef" likewise beeniffeuijideiiiet the rapid absorption of oil, permitting quick lighting, quick development of the flame and better control of the flame, and eilicient and thorough vaporization of the fuel with minimum coking effect. If too great a quantity of fuel is supplied a. smoky operation will result, hence I prefer to use a, thin, soft, intermediate lamination. While a heavy, soft asbestos felt may be used it has been found that thin felt affords better flame control.

By virtue of my novel construction it is possible to form the wicks in at strip formation for convenience in packaging and shipment, or for ceiling in rolls, and the wicks may readily be bent and formed to fiat a burner base of an oil burner without possibility of rupturing or breaking of the laminations thereof, irrespective of whether the laminations are secured together by means of stitching, adhesive or by staples.

It will be apparent that where it is desired that one or more laminations of the Wick be corrugated, such laminations may be initially corrugated prior to connection with the other laminations, or the total assembly of the laminations Y may be corrugated or crimped together by passing the laminated strip through suitable crimp ing or corrugating wheels.

While not absolutely essential, I prefer to utilize a wick construction composed of a plurality of laminations wherein one of the intermediate laminations has the surfaces thereof rippled, and wherein said intermediatelamination is formed from a relatively soft asbestos paper stock which possesses a higher degree of capiilarity than the other laminations.

The illustrations in the drawing are to be understood as diagrammatic representations, shown on an enlarged and somewhat exaggerated scale.

While I have herein shown and described certain preferred embodiments of my invention, manifestly it is capable of further modification without departing from the spirit and scope thereof. I do not, therefore, wish to be understood as limiting this invention to the precise forms herein disclosed, except as I may be so limited in the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

l. An oil burner wick comprising a plurality of superimposed laminations of asbestos paper K connected together as a unit, and having an intermediate lamination formed with rippled surfaces, and one of the other laminations being corrugated.

2. An oil burner wick comprising a plurality of superimposed laminations of asbestos paper connected together as a unit, the inner and outer laminations being corrugated and an intermediate lamination being formed with rippled surfaces.

3. An oil burner wick comprising a plurality of superimposed laminations of` asbestos paper connected together as a unit, the inner lamination being corrugated and an intermediate 1amination being formed with rippled surfaces.

4. An oil burner wick comprising a plurality of superimposed laminations of asbestos paper connected together as a unit, the outer lamination as compared to the other laminations being .formed of relatively harder and more, dense paper stock, and one of the other laminations being formed with ridged surfaces.

5. An oil burner wick comprising a plurality of superimposed laminations of asbestos paper coni nected together as a unit, the outer lamination as compared to the other laminations being formed of relatively harder and more, dense paper stock,

and one of the other laminations being formed with rippled surfaces.

6. An oil burner wick comprising a plurality of superimposed laminations of asbestos paper connected together as a unit, the outer lamination as compared to the other laminations being formed of relatively harder and more, dense paper stock, and an intermediate lamination formed with rippled surfaces.

7. An oil burner wick comprising a plurality of superimposed laminations of asbestos paper connected together as a unit, the outer lamina-Y tion being formed of relatively hard, dense paper stock; the inner lamination being corrugated and an intermediate lamination as compared to the outer laminations being formed of relatively soft paper stock and formed with rippled surfaces.

8. An oil burner wick comprising a plurality of superimposed laminations of asbestos paper connected together as a unit, one of the laminations being formed of relatively soft paper stock, and the outer lamination as compared to said one lamination being formed of relatively harder and more, dense paper stock.`

9. An oil burner wick comprising three superimposed laminations of asbestos paper connected together as a unit, each of said laminations being corrugated, and the intermediate lamination being formed with rippled surfaces.

10. An' oil burner wick comprising a plurality of superimposed laminations of asbestos paper connected together as a unit, at least two of said laminations as compared to the remaining lamination or lamination-s being formed of relatively harder and more, dense paper stock, and another lamination being formed with ridge'd Y surfaces.

11. An oil burner wick comprising three superimposed laminations of asbestos paper connected together as a unit, the outer lamination being formed of relatively hard, dense paper stock, the inner lamination as compared to the outer 1amination being formed of relatively soft paper stock, and the intermediate lamination being formed with ridged surfaces.

12. An oil burner Wick Icomprising three superimposed laminations of asbestos palper connected together as a unit, the outer and inner laminations as compared to the intermediate lamination being formed of relatively harder and more, dense y paper stock, and the intermediate lamination being formed with ridged surfaces.

1.3. An oil burner Wick comprising three superimposed laminations of asbestos paper connected together as a unit, the intermediate lamination "and one of the other laminations being formed l of relatively hard, dense paper stock, and the remaining lamination being formed with ridged sudfaces.

JESSE M. WEAVER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2493961 *Jan 22, 1948Jan 10, 1950Metal Textile CorpWick for oil burners
US4557687 *Mar 31, 1983Dec 10, 1985Schirnecker Hans LudwigFuel element and fireplace constructions using same
US4735568 *Aug 18, 1986Apr 5, 1988Silver Industrial Co., Ltd.Wicks for oil burning appliance
US5373962 *Jun 29, 1994Dec 20, 1994Lee; Donald M.Drum top drier
US5405044 *Sep 8, 1992Apr 11, 1995Lee; Donald M.Drum top drier
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/325, 112/440, 428/154
International ClassificationF23D3/00, F23D3/08
Cooperative ClassificationF23D3/08
European ClassificationF23D3/08