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Publication numberUS2371579 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 13, 1945
Filing dateOct 9, 1941
Priority dateOct 9, 1941
Publication numberUS 2371579 A, US 2371579A, US-A-2371579, US2371579 A, US2371579A
InventorsPaul M Cole, Lodge Alvin
Original AssigneeAmercian Viscose Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for treating filamentary material
US 2371579 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 13, 1945. P. M. COLE EI'AL METHODS AND APPARATUS FOR TREATING FILAMENTARY MATERIAL Filed Oct. 9, 1941 R O I T V DD Wm m H; MN M 1 muab r 0 4 V. w L/ iiV/ E v I 7// MW m as mgm h 9 ED MW-1 :42 a? m BIA k mw/E %E% Patented Mar. 1.3, 1945 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR TREATING FILAMENTARY MATERIAL Paul M. Cole, Auburn, N. Y., and Alvin Lodge, Meadvllle, Pa., assignors to American Vicente Corporation, Wilmington, Del., a corporation of Delaware Application October 9, 1941, Serial No. 414,326

, 19 Claims. (01. 8-1513) This invention relates to improved methods and apparatus for treating filamentary material in fluids at elevated temperatures and more particularly to stretching treatment at elevated temperatures.

It is frequently desirable to treat filamentary material with or in superheated liquids, that is liquids heated above their normal boilingpoints under ordinary conditions of pressure and when so treating the filamentary material, it is necessary to seal the treatment chamber to prevem the escape of the vapors of the liquids that would otherwise escape to the atmosphere while introducing. the filamentary material into the treatment chamber. It is also necessary to prevent any conversion the superheated liquid into vapor form which would give rise to a mixture of liquid and vapor thereby resulting in irregularity of treatment wherever such a mixture should come into contact with the filamentary material. It is further highly desirable to provide for concurrent flow of the filamentary ma terial with the superheated liquid in order to avoid irregularities.

It is an object of the invention to. provide for treating filamentary material with a superheated liquid into which the filamentar material. is introduced by means of the flow of a body of liquid which also serves to seal the treatment liquid to prevent its escaping from the treatment chamber. A further object is to provide for concurrent fiow of the filamentary material and the injecting of treatment fluids into, throughout, and out of the treatment chamber. Further objects of the invention are to provide methods and apparatus for treating filamentary material in the manners and for the purposes hereinafter described.

In the drawing,

Figure 1' illustrates in cross-section one preferred embodiment of the invention,

Figure 2 shows a detail in cross-section of the embodiment of Figure 1, and

Figure 3 shows a modified embodiment of the invention.

As shown in Figure 1, the filamentary material F is supplied to a godet or roller 2 and the guide 3 associated therewith, passes through the treatment apparatus, and thence to the godets 4 and 5. This embodiment will be described with reference to a stretching treatment in which the godets I and 5 rotate at a higher peripheral speed than the godet 2, as the result of which stretching of the filamentary material occurs within the treatment apparatus.

While the treating chamber 6 may be of any shape, it is preferably or relatively long tubular shape as shown in Figure 1, and is provided with I orifices l and I respectively at each end thereof.

As shown in Figure 2, the orifice I through which the filamentary material enters preferably has a gradually increasing diameter in order to reduce turbulence of the liquids therein introduced for the purposes hereinaiter described. The orifice 8 at the exit end of the apparatus is also preferably provided with increasing inside diameter for the. same reason. The entrance end of the chamber 6 may have a pipe 9 connected thereto for introducing the superheated liquids. If desired, the end of the chamber 6 adjacent the point of entering of the filaments may be provided with a jacket I. connected with entrance and exit pipes H and II respectively for a heating fluid, such as steam. Similarly, the chamber 6 may be provided with a well it for accommodating a thermometer I4 and a pressure gage 5. The chamber is also provided near its exit end with a second jacket it connected with the pipes H and is for entrance and exit respectively of cooling means, such as cold water.

Just outside of the entrance orifice l, and in aligmnent therewith there is arranged a nozzle is connected with the pipe 20 to which a heated liquid is supplied under pressure. The flow oi the heated liquid through nozzle, it forms. a jet through the orifice against the pressure of the super-heated liquid in the chamber t.- There is fastened in superposition over the nozzle l9, a sort of hopper 2! into which heated liquid may be introduced through the pipe 22 and from which any overflow may enter the pipe 23. This hopper or funnel. in sheet, may be open to the atmosphere, and is provided with an opening 2% in alignment with the orifice i so that filamentary material may proceed through it and the orifice. The heated liquid within the hopper or tunnel 2| serves to prevent entrapment of air by the jet or fiiamentary'material.

The filamentary material, after entering the chamber; comes into'contact with the mixture oi the hot liquid introduced by the jet and the superheated liquid introduced through the pipe 9 and upon being heated while in contact with the mixture of liquids undergoes stretching. As stated above, the steam jacket in may be omitted provided the temperature of. superheat oi the liquid entering pipe 9 is sumciently high so that the resulting mixture has the desired temperature to efiect stretching. As the superheated ing chamber, its temperature is lowered by the cooling liquid within the jacket It to such a degree that it is below the boiling point at atmospheric pressure, and consequently when the liquid .fiows out of the orifice 8, no violent evaporation into the atmosphere takes place.

In the modification of Figure 3, the apparatus comprises a series of chambers 25, 2B, 21 and 28, and treating by the superheated liquid takes place mainly in the pipe 29 (broken oil to facilitate illustration), chamber 21, and a portion of the pipe 30. In this arrangement, the superheated liquid enters pipe 3! and the filamentary material is introduced through the orifice 32 by the jet from the nozzle 33. A pipe 34 is provided as a vent. The chamber 2! is provided with pipes 35 and 36 connected to the temperature and pressure gauges. To prevent escape of steam or vapor to the atmosphere through the discharge pipe 31, cold water is fed directly into the stream of superheated fluid about the filamentary material through pipe 38 in such a manner that concurrent fiow or the liquids and filamentary material takes place.

As an illustration of the operation of the device, the apparatus of Figure 3 may be interposed between two stretching godets and it may be supplied with filamentary material composed of Vinyon, a copolymer of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate. The nozzle 33 is supplied with water at a temperature of 98 C. while the pipe 3| is provided with water under pressure at a temperature of 110 0., and pipe 38 is provided with cooling water at a temperature of about 90 C.

The apparatus may be employed for treating filamentary material of other constitution, such as cellulose esters or .ethers. e. g. cellulose acetate, regenerated cellulose, polyvinyl chloride, chlorinated polyvinyl chloride, chlorinated Vinyon or other natural or artificial filaments. The treatment fluids may be water superheated above its boiling point, other inert liquids superheated above their boiling points, steam itself, vapors of other inert liquids, or even for some purposes, vapors or superheated liquids having a swelling effect upon the filamentary material being treated. The apparatus may also be employed for carrying out chemical processes, such as saponification of cellulose acetate, or it may be usedto wash filamentary material. Such other treatments may be performed upon the filamentary material with stretching rollers or without stretching. In the latter case, of course, the godets placed at either end of the chamber are driven at the same speed.

While preferred embodiments of the invention have been disclosed, the description is intended to be illustrative only, and it is to be understood that changes and variations may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

What we claim is:

l. A process of treating filamentary material comprising providing a stream of superheated liquid under pressure flowing in substantially only one general direction throughout its length, maintaining the stream under sumcient pressure to prevent ebullition substantially throughout its length, continuously introducing the filamentary material into said'stream with a jet of heated liquid directed at high velocity in substantially the same general direction to prevent escape of the superheated liquid to the atmosphere at the material entrance and continuously passing the general direction offiow.

material through said stream concurrent with the 2. A process of treating filamentary material comprising providing a stream of superheated liquid under pressure flowing in substantially only one general direction throughout its length, continuously introducing the filamentary material into said stream with a jet of heated liquid dirooted in substantially the same general direction and continuously passing the material through said stream concurrent with the general direction of fiow and maintaining the stream under sumcient pressure to prevent ebullition substantially throughout its length by continuously cooling a portion of said stream adjacent the point of exit' general direction of fiow, maintaining the stream under sufiicient pressure to prevent ebullition subtantially throughout its length by continuously cooling a portion of said stream adjacent the point of exit of the filamentary material therefrom to a temperature below the boiling point of the liquid, and stretching said material during its passage through said superheated liquid.

4. The process of treating thermoplastic filamentary material comprising providing a stream of superheated liquid under pressure flowing in substantially only one general direction throughout its length, continuously. introducing the filamentary material into said stream with a jet of heated liquid directed in substantially the same general direction and continuously passing the material through said stream concurrent with the general direction of fiow, maintaining the stream under sufiicient pressure to prevent ebullition substantially throughout its length by continuously cooling a portion of said stream adjacent the point of exit of the filamentary material therefrom to a temperature below the boiling point of the liquid, andstretching said material during its passage through said stream.

5. In apparatus for treating filamentary material, a substantially closed pressure chamber provided with two openings for permitting entrance and exit respectively of filamentary material, means for introducing a superheated fluid into said chamber, means for forcing a liquid with said filamentary material through said entrance opening and means for cooling the fiuid adjacent said exit opening.

6. In apparatus for treating filamentary material, a substantially closed pressure chamber provided with two openings for permitting entrance and exit respectively of filamentary material, means for introducing a superheated fiuid into said chamber, means for forcing a liquid with said filamentary material through said entrance opening, means for cooling the fluid adjacent said exit opening and means for stretching the filamentary material as it passes through the chamber.

7. In apparatus for treating filamentary material. a substantially closed pressure chamber the material.

trance and exit respectively. of filamentary material. means for introducing a superheated fluid under pressure into said chamber, a nozzle in terial, a substantially closed pressure chamber provided with two openings for permitting entrance and exit respectively of filamentary material, means for introducing a superheated fluid underpressure into said chamber, a nozzle in substantial alignment with the entrance opening for forcing a liquid into the chamber, means for cooling the fluid adjacent said exit opening, and additional nozzles at said entrance and exit openings having internal diameters gradually increasing in the direction of flow to, reduce turbulence.

9. In apparatus for treating filamentarymaterial, a substantially closed pressure chamber provided .wlth two openings for permitting entrance and exit respectively of filamentary material, means for introducing a superheated fluid under pressure into said chamber, means for forcing a liquid with said filamentary material through said entrance opening, and means for introducing a, cooling fluid into said chamber adjacent the exit opening. 1

10. In apparatus for treating filamentary material, .asubstantially closed pressure chamber provided with two openings for permitting en'- trance and exit respectively of filamentary material, means for introducing water heated above its boiling point into said chamber, means for forcing water below its boiling point with said filamentary material through said entrance opening and means for cooling the water to a point below its boiling point adjacent said exit opening.

11. In apparatus for treating filamentary material, a substantially closed pressure chamber provided with two openings in opposite walls thereof for permitting entrance and exit respectively of filamentary material, an injector comprising said entrance opening and a passage for conducting a fluid through said opening thereby to force the material into the chamber, and means comprising a conduit connected to the chamber and opening thereinto in proximity to said entrance opening, said means being arranged to conduct a treating fluid into the cham-v ber and to direct it about the material in substantially the same direction of travel asthat of 12. In apparatus for treating filamentary material, a substantially closed pressure chamber provided with two openings in opposite walls thereof for permitting entrance and exit respectively of filamentary material, an injector comprising said entrance opening and a passage for conducting a fluid through said opening thereby to force the material into the chamber, means comprising a conduit connected to the chamber and opening thereinto in proximity to said entrance opening, said means being arranged to conduct a treating fluid into the chamber and todirect it about the material in substantially provided with two openings for permitting endirection of its lengthjmaintaining the stream under sumcient pressure to prevent ebullition substantially continuously throughout its length, continuously passing the filamentary material through the stream'longitudinally thereof, continuously introducing into the stream adjacent one end thereof a jet of heated liquid directed in substantially the same general direction to prevent escape of the superheated liquid at such end, and continuously cooling the stream adjacent the other end thereof to a temperature below the boiling point of the iiquid'to prevent escape of the liquid in the superheated condition at this other end.

14. A process of treating filamentary material comprising providing a stream of superheated liquid under pressure flowing generally in the direction of its length, maintaining the stream under sufficient pressure to prevent ebullition tinuously introducing into the stream adjacent one end thereof a-jet of heated liquid directed in substantially thesame general direction to prevent escape of the superheated liquid at such end, and continuously cooling the stream adjacent the other end thereof to a temperature below the boiling point of the liquid to prevent escape of the'liquid in the superheated condition at this other end, and stretching the material-during its passage through the stream.

15. In apparatus for treating filamentary ma-' terial, a substantially closed relatively long, straight pressure chamber provided at its ends with restricted openings for permitting entrance and exit respectively of filamentary material, means for supplying a treating fluid to the cham- 4 her under pressure, and'an injector associated the same direction of travel as that of the mate-- with the entrance opening having its dischargepassage constructed and arranged with respect to the openingto conduct a sealing fiuid at high velocity through the entire transverse area of said opening into the chamber with thematerial thereby preventing discharge of treating fluid from the chamber through the entrance opening.

16. In apparatus for treating filamentary material, a substantially closed, relatively long, narrow pressure chamber provided at its ends with openings for permitting entrance and exit respectively of filamentary material, means for supplying a treating fluid to the chamber and to direct it about the material in substantially the same direction of travel as thatof the material, and an injector associated with the entrance opening having its discharge passage constructed and arranged with respect to the opening to conduct a sealing fluid at high velocity through the entire transverse area of said opening into the chamber with the material thereby preventing discharge of treatment fiuid from the chamber through the entrance opening.

17. In apparatus for treating filamentary material, a substantially closed, relatively long, narrow pressure chamber provided at its ends with openings for permitting entrance and exit respectively of filamentary material, means for supplying a treating fluid tothe chamber and to direct it about the material in substantially the same direction of travel as that of the material, and an injector associated with the entrance opening having its discharge passage constructed and arranged with respect to the opening to conentire transverse area of said opening into the chamber with the material thereby preventing discharge of treatment fluid from the chamber through the entrance opening, said treating fluid supply means comprising a passage substantially concentrically arranged about the injector passage.

18. In apparatus for treating fllainentary material, a substantially closed relatively long, straight pressure chamber provided at its ends with restricted openings for permitting entrance and exit respectively of filamentary material and an injector associated with the entrance opening having its discharge passage constructed and arranged with respect to the opening to conduct a sealing fluid at high velocity through the entire transverse area of said opening into the chamber with the material thereby preventing discharge or fluid from the chamber through the entrance opening, and a positively driven strand feeding device disposed outside the chamber adjacent each end thereof for stretching the strand as it passes through the chamber.

19. In apparatus for treating filamentary material, a substantially closed relatively long, narrow pressure chamber provided at its ends with openings for permitting entrance and exit respectively of filamentary material means for supplying a treating fluid to the chamber and to direct it about the material in substantially the same direction of travel as that of the material, and an injector associated with the entrance opening having its discharge passage constructed and arranged with respect to the opening to conduct a sealing fluid at high velocity through the entire transverse area of said opening into the chamber with the material thereby preventing discharge of treatment fluid from the chamber through the entrance opening, and a positively driven strand feeding device disposed outside the chamber adjacent each end thereof for stretching the strand as it passes through the chamber.

PAUL M. COLE. ALVIN LODGE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2425037 *Jul 17, 1943Aug 5, 1947British CelaneseFluid treating apparatus for yarns
US2450045 *Jan 15, 1943Sep 28, 1948Celanese CorpApparatus for the treatment of textile strands
US2456384 *Jun 4, 1946Dec 14, 1948Du PontThermal-stretching apparatus for yarn
US2468081 *Nov 18, 1944Apr 26, 1949American Viscose CorpMethod and apparatus for treating filamentary material
US2485957 *Apr 26, 1946Oct 25, 1949American Cyanamid CoApparatus for treating strands
US2509279 *Dec 22, 1944May 30, 1950American Viscose CorpProcess and apparatus for treatment of filamentary materials
US2520202 *Jan 8, 1947Aug 29, 1950Celanese CorpTreatment of filaments, foils, and similar articles
US2584043 *Jun 20, 1945Jan 29, 1952American Viscose CorpMethod and apparatus for processing filamentary materials
US2586800 *Oct 23, 1946Feb 26, 1952Celanese CorpApparatus for the treatment of filamentary materials
US2622961 *Apr 17, 1948Dec 23, 1952Celanese CorpGaseous treatment of filamentary textile material at supersonic and subsonic gas velocities and apparatus therefor
US2661619 *Jan 17, 1950Dec 8, 1953Chemstrand CorpApparatus for the fluid treatment of fibers and the like
US2713784 *Nov 9, 1949Jul 26, 1955Du PontTubular coil yarn processor
US2720442 *May 23, 1949Oct 11, 1955Ici LtdMethod of treating tows in tubes
US2725276 *Oct 20, 1949Nov 29, 1955American Enka CorpProcess and apparatus for treating threads in tubes
US2772552 *May 4, 1950Dec 4, 1956Maurer Sa Ing AApparatus for aftertreatment of freshspun artificial filaments in continuous flowing liquid
US2787152 *Mar 10, 1953Apr 2, 1957American Enka CorpJet suction device for tube spinning
US2835121 *Oct 26, 1955May 20, 1958Dow Chemical CoSealing orifice for steam tubes and the like
US2899265 *Feb 20, 1953Aug 11, 1959 Spinning tube
US3005327 *Nov 21, 1958Oct 24, 1961Ames Textile CorpApparatus for treatment of long webs under pressure
US3095343 *Sep 15, 1960Jun 25, 1963United States Filter CorpMethod for treating continuous filamentary tows
US3110169 *Jun 8, 1961Nov 12, 1963Cocker Machine & Foundry CompaTextile treating apparatus
US3413397 *Aug 17, 1961Nov 26, 1968Eastman Kodak CoProcess for stretching polypropylene filaments
US3689622 *Jun 12, 1970Sep 5, 1972Mitsubishi Rayon CoMethod for producing highly crimped regenerated cellulose fibers by solvent stretching
US4217323 *Jan 25, 1978Aug 12, 1980John Heathcoat & Company LimitedHeating and drawing of synthetic filaments
US5290500 *Jul 29, 1992Mar 1, 1994Puget Sound Rope CorporationMethod for heat stretching synthetic fiber rope
Classifications
U.S. Classification264/289.6, 68/181.00R, 34/629, 8/132, 8/130.1, 264/DIG.730, 8/130, 28/246, 68/6, 68/207
International ClassificationD01D10/04
Cooperative ClassificationY10S264/73, D01D10/0481
European ClassificationD01D10/04H5