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Publication numberUS2374954 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 1, 1945
Filing dateJun 3, 1944
Priority dateJun 3, 1944
Publication numberUS 2374954 A, US 2374954A, US-A-2374954, US2374954 A, US2374954A
InventorsErasmo Pipitone
Original AssigneeErasmo Pipitone
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe-heel construction
US 2374954 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 1, 1945. E. PIPITONE 2,374,954

SHOE HEEL CONSTRUCTION Filed Ju ne 3, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Figrl I 1 H Fig. 5

Fig: l' r INVENTORI ERA5MO PlPITONE- May 1, 1945.

E. PIPITONE SHOE HEEL CONSTRUCTION Filed. June 3 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fig- 8 INVENTOR. ERASMO PIPITONE ATIDRNFZ Patented May 1, 1945 UNITED ES PATENT" o-F' ms e e f 1 2,374,954 v j SHOE H EEL coNsrRUc'rIoN Erasino Pipitonafiobokemlq. V Application June' 3, 1944, Serial No. 538,631

4 Claims. wise-a4) My invention relates to a heeled shoe. Or-

dinarily, the heel is afiiXed to the remaining or main body of the shoe by nails. This structure has several drawbacks. 1 It cannot withstand considerable stress, the nails holding the heel by mere frictional engagement, and consequently the heel may become loose or even. may be lost. The nailing damages the pierced material. The upper ends of the nails often press throughjthe superposed layers, may damage 'alining, an insole or an interposed cushion and may even hurt the foot and the stockings. In addition the nailing makes the repair or replacement of the heel diificult.

Objects of my invention arefto avoid all these drawbacks and to secure the heel to the shoe body without nails, to provide a structure which withstands considerable stress, and to provide a heel which securely supports the main shoe body.

Other objects are to make the mounting, dismounting and replacement of the heel easy. quick and efficient. e

A further object is to provide a resiliently cushioned shoe in which the cushion can not come in contact with nails. I

Still further objects and advantages will appear from the following description of an exemplifying embodiment of my invention and of a modification thereof, from the appended claims and from the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 shows a partially sectional side elevation of a shoe representing an illustrative embodiment of the invention.

Fig, 2 shows a part used in the embodiment shown in Fig. 1, said part being seen in original condition from the upper side in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 shows the part shown in Fig. 2, seen from the left side in Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 shows another part of the same embodiment seen from the lower side in Fig. 1.

seen from the lower side in Fig. 1. I I

Fig. 6 shows another modification of the part' shown in Fig. 4 in the same position as Fig. 4. Fig. 7 shows a sideelevation of thepart shown in Fig. 6 in a position corresponding to Fig. 1.

Fig. 8 shows the partshown in Figs. 6 and 7 seen from the right side in Fig. '7.

Referring to the embodiment of my invention shown in Figs. 1 to 5, numeral l indicates a platform, preferably of leather. A metal shank 2, preferably of thin steel, is superposed on the platform I and may be pressed into the upper surface thereof. A small bridge or angularly bent strip side of 2, for example, by welding or soldering. The platform I has a perforation or window where the bridge 31 is inserted. The bridge 3 has a long slotA with an enlarged right end5 for the introduction of the head 6 of a screw bolt 1..

I bent at a zone I3 below the nut 8, the upper .end

. Fig. 5 shows the heel of the same embodiment,

of the bolt being perpendicular to the slotted part of the bridge 3, and the lower part of the bolt projecting from the platform I in the direction of the hole In. A lift or tip I! covers the lower surface of the heel '9 and seals the recess I I.

A cushion I4 of resilient material, preferably of sponge rubber, is superposed on the shank 2 and covers also the adjacent area of the platform I. A thin layer or insole I5, preferably of leather, covers the cushion I4 and holds the same in a slightly compressed condition with the tapered rim I6 of the cushion pressed down to the platform I.

The other parts of the shoe may be made of any suitable material, and the shoe may have any shape which includes a heel.

Figs. 6 to 8 show a modification of the shank which'may be used instead of that shown in Figs. 1 and 4. The shank 20 differs from the shank 2 in that the bridge is not separately made and thereafter afllxed to the body of the shank, but is formed by a part I8 of the shank body which is pressed or stamped down. Thereby, an open recess, I9 appears over the pan-shaped part I8. The screw 1 (Fig. 1) can be inserted from the upper side, and no long slot is necessary. Instead,

the bottom of the pan It has a circular hole 2| on the platform with the projecting bridge or I of metal 3 is permanently aflixedto the lower as for the passage of the screw 1. Except for these differences, the shank 20 is shaped, mounted and used in the same manner as the shank 2.

The assemblage of the shoe comprises the assemblageof the body, that is of the shoe without heel, and the affixing of the heel and the lift. I

When the body is mounted, the shank is placed pan inserted in the perforation of the platform.

The screw I, may be inserted and secured by the nut B before or after mounting the shank on the platform. Then, the cushion I4 is aflixed, for example, by cementing its rims to the platform. Thereafter, a lining, an insole, the upper and any other parts may be assembled to the platform or to the body by conventional methods.

The separately prepared heel may be finished in conventional manner. Then, the projecting end of the screw 1 is passed through the hole l and equipped with the nut I2. This nut is then tightened by means of a key-wrench or otherwise. Finally, the recess H is filled with putty or the like, and the lift I1 is fastened in conventional manner, for example, by glue or nails.

For replacement of the heel, the lift and the putty or other filler is removed and the nut .l2 is unscrewed whereupon the heel can be separated from the body. Then, the body is immediately ready for mounting another heel in the manner described before.

I desire it understood that my invention is not confined to the embodiment shown and described, the same being merely illustrative, and that the invention may be carried out in other ways without departing from the spirit of the invention as it is obvious that the embodiment shown and described is only one of the many that may be employed to attain the objects of my invention.

Having described the nature of my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A shoe comprising a platform having a perforation, a metallic shank superposed on said platform and having a lower projection inserted in said perforation, a heel with a hole, a bolt having one end affixed to said projection and having a part passing through said hole, and detachable means mounted on the other end of said bolt and pressing said heel against said platform.

2. A shoe comprising a platform having a perforation, a metallic shank superposed on said platform, a slotted bridge affixed to the lower side of said shank and inserted in said perforation, a heel with a hole, a screw bolt having a head positioned below said shank over the slot of said bridge and having a shaft passing through the slot of said bridge and through the hole of said heel, a nut positioned on said bolt below the slotof said bridge and securing said bolt to said bridge, and another nut positioned on the lower endof said bolt and securing said heel to said platform.

3. A shoe comprising a platform having a perforation, a shank superposed on said platform and having a pan-shaped depression inserted in said perforation, the bottom of said depression having a hole, a heel with a hole, a screw bolt having a head positioned over said hole of said depression and having a shaft passing through said hole of said depression and through the hole in said heel, a nut positioned on said bolt below said hole of said depression and securing said bolt to said shank, and another nut positioned on the lower end of said bolt and securing said heel to said platform.

4. A shoe comprising a platform having a perforation, a shank superposed on said platform and having a lower projection inserted in said perforation, a heel with a hole, a bolt having one end aflixed to said projection and having a bent shaft passing through said hole, and means mounted on the other end of said bolt and securing said heel to said platform.

ERASMO PIPI'IONE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2417906 *Sep 10, 1945Mar 25, 1947Odilon BoivinShoe heel and means for attaching the same
US2713731 *Sep 26, 1952Jul 26, 1955Cangemi Salvatore JHeel
US3822709 *Jan 15, 1973Jul 9, 1974Gruner MShoe having heel with replaceable insert member
US5560126 *Aug 17, 1994Oct 1, 1996Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5615497 *Aug 17, 1993Apr 1, 1997Meschan; David F.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5806210 *Oct 12, 1995Sep 15, 1998Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US5826352 *Sep 30, 1996Oct 27, 1998Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5918384 *Sep 30, 1996Jul 6, 1999Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5970628 *Sep 8, 1998Oct 26, 1999Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6050002 *May 18, 1999Apr 18, 2000Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6195916Feb 25, 2000Mar 6, 2001Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6324772Aug 17, 2000Dec 4, 2001Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6604300Dec 4, 2001Aug 12, 2003Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6662471Oct 18, 1999Dec 16, 2003Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6874254 *Oct 30, 2003Apr 5, 2005Seychelles Imports, LlcThong-type shoe having a heel and a layered sole
US6962009Jun 30, 2004Nov 8, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Bottom surface configuration for athletic shoe
US6966129Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Cushioning for athletic shoe
US6966130Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Plate for athletic shoe
US6968635Jun 30, 2004Nov 29, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe bottom
US6996923Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbing athletic shoe
US6996924Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Rear sole structure for athletic shoe
US7040040Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Midsole for athletic shoe
US7040041Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with plate
US7043857Jun 30, 2004May 16, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe having cushioning
US7069671Jun 30, 2004Jul 4, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Arch bridge for athletic shoe
US7076892Jun 30, 2004Jul 18, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbent athletic shoe
US7082700Aug 3, 2005Aug 1, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration
US7089689Aug 3, 2005Aug 15, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration and non-ground-engaging member
US7114269May 28, 2003Oct 3, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US7127835Dec 11, 2003Oct 31, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US7155843Aug 3, 2005Jan 2, 2007Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7380350Jun 30, 2004Jun 3, 2008Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with bottom opening
US7536809Dec 28, 2006May 26, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7540099Jun 30, 2004Jun 2, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Heel support for athletic shoe
US7596888Dec 12, 2008Oct 6, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Shoe with flexible plate
US9220317 *Sep 20, 2010Dec 29, 2015Gabrielle GreenTransitional shoe with screw-on heel
US20040123496 *Dec 11, 2003Jul 1, 2004Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US20040231192 *Jun 30, 2004Nov 25, 2004Meschan David F.Plate for athletic shoe
US20040231193 *Jun 30, 2004Nov 25, 2004Meschan David F.Shock absorbing athletic shoe
US20040231194 *Jun 30, 2004Nov 25, 2004Meschan David F.Athletic shoe with plate
US20040231195 *Jun 30, 2004Nov 25, 2004Meschan David F.Midsole for athletic shoe
US20040231198 *Jun 30, 2004Nov 25, 2004Meschan David F.Cushioning for athletic shoe
US20040231199 *Jun 30, 2004Nov 25, 2004Meschan David F.Arch bridge for athletic shoe
US20040237345 *Jun 30, 2004Dec 2, 2004Meschan David F.Rear sole structure for athletic shoe
US20040237347 *Jun 30, 2004Dec 2, 2004Meschan David F.Bottom surface configuration for athletic shoe
US20040244222 *Jun 30, 2004Dec 9, 2004Meschan David F.Shock absorbent athletic shoe
US20050262730 *Aug 3, 2005Dec 1, 2005Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration
US20050262731 *Aug 3, 2005Dec 1, 2005Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US20050262732 *Aug 3, 2005Dec 1, 2005Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration and non-ground-engaging member
US20060117602 *Jun 30, 2004Jun 8, 2006Meschan David FAthletic shoe with bottom opening
US20110067265 *Mar 24, 2011Gabrielle GreenTransitional shoe with screw-on heel
WO2011037992A1 *Sep 22, 2010Mar 31, 2011Gabrielle GreenTransitional shoe with screw-on heel
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/34.00R, 36/82, 36/42, 36/76.00R
International ClassificationA43B13/00, A43B13/34
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/34
European ClassificationA43B13/34