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Publication numberUS2375770 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 15, 1945
Filing dateNov 19, 1943
Priority dateNov 19, 1943
Publication numberUS 2375770 A, US 2375770A, US-A-2375770, US2375770 A, US2375770A
InventorsDahiberg Arthur O
Original AssigneeDahiberg Arthur O
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fountain pen
US 2375770 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May` 15, 1945.

A. Q. DAHLBERG FUNTAIN PEN :s sheets-shed 1 Filed Nov. 19, 1943 e a z, 01"? VIII/[lll l5, 1945- A. o. DAHLBERG FOUNTAIN PEN 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 19, 1945 A. O. DAHLBERG May 15, 1945.

FOUNTAIN PEN 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Nov. 19, 1943 Patented May 15, 1945 UNITEDf STATES PATENT OFFICE FOUNTAIN PEN Arthur 0. Dahlberg, Scarsdaie, N. Y.

Application November 19, 1943, Serial No. 510,902

' (ci. 12o-52) 31 Claims.

My invention relates generally to fountain pens and more particularly to an improved pen point and means for mounting the pen point in ink receiving communication with the ink reservoir. The present invention represents an improvement over my prior patented invention disclosed and claimed in Letters Patent No. 2.016.106, issued October 1, 1935.

One of the most expensive elements in a fountain pen is the pen point or nib, which necessarily has a relatively high content of gold in proportion to any other metals which may be used. The well known anti-corrosive characteristic of gold makes it an almost indispensable element in the manufacture of pen points for fountain pens. Any practical construction by which the amount of gold required is reduced is extremely desirable, provided the writing characteristics or usefulness of the pen are not impaired.

The assembly of the nib and the feed bar is an operation which at present usually requires a high degree of skill, and any method of assembling these parts which could be practiced by a less skilled workman would also reduce the cost of manufacture. My invention contemplates the formation of a nib having a shape complementary to the shape of the feed bar, which would automatically correctly position the nib on the feed bar when these parts are assembled.

It has become a custom among fountain pen manufacturers to guarantee their product for life or forever. To make a pen stand up under constant use for a long period of time, the manufacturers have made the Ipen point harder and stiffer, which makes writing with such a point less pleasant and more wearying. I have overcome this objection to guaranteed fountain pens by mounting the nib in such manner thatthe shock of writingis absorbed, yet without in any way restricting the iiow of ink from the ink reservoir to the writing point. Furthermore, I have been able appreciably to reduce the cost of the nib by materially reducing its size and without impairing its utility in fountain pen constructions employing a capillary ink collector which is separate from the feed bar.

A patent issued in the name of Marlin S. Baker on December 3, 1940, No. 2,223,541, relates to a fountain pen which is marketed by The ParkerA Pen Company ofJanesville, Wisconsin, under the trade name of "Parker 51. In the fountain pen of this construction, the nib has a shank of considerable length which is mounted within an ink collector to form capillary ink passages which, through other capillary passages, are in communication with the ink reservoir. My present invention is also an improvement over the Parkerl construction in that the shank of the pen nib may be relatively short and is mounted independently of the ink collector. This 'reduces the cost of manufacture of such pens without destroying any of the advantages gained by the type of construction illustrated in the Baker patent.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to obtain all of the advantages in fountain pen 4construction set out above, and to impart to the improved fountain pen the desired writing characteristics, while reducing the manufacturing costs.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal cross sectional view of the lower half of a fountain pen embodying my invention:

Fig. 2 is a greatly enlarged plan viev of the underside of the pen point mounted in the pen illustrated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the pen point and may be considered asI taken on the line 3--3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged cross sectional view of the lower end of the pen of Fig. 1, taken on the same plane but looking in the opposite direction and showing another form of positioning the ink ducts in the feed bar;

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the pen point;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the lower end of the feed bar illustrated in Fig. 4;

Fig. 7 is a longitudinal cross sectional view of a second embodiment of my invention, and illustrates the filling mechanism;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged cross sectional view taken'` on the line 8-8 of Fig. 7;

' Fig. 9 is a cross sectional View of the lower end of the pen taken on the plane of the line 9-9 of Fig. 8;

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary side View of that portion ofthe barrel carrying the cap retaining ring;

Fig. 11 is a cross sectional view taken on the line lI-II of Fig. 7;

Fig. 12 is a cross sectional view of the lower end of a fountain pen, illustrating another form of the pen point;`

Fig. 13 `is a cross sectional view of the lower end of a fountain pen similar to the pen of Fig. 1, but illustrating a modified construction;

Fig. 14 illustrates the shock absorber mounting of my invention and is a cross sectional view of the lower end of a pen; and

Fig. 15 is a view similar'to Fig. 14, but showing a modified construction of the shock absorber mounting.

For a better and more complete understanding of the principles on which the ink collector operates, reference may be had to the aforementioned Baker patent and to Patent No. 2,187,-

528, issued January 16, 1940, to Russell T. Wing.`

` sition-nearly vertical.)

Thefountain pen of my invention comprises a barrel section 26 forming an ink reservoir 22.

which is adapted to be filled by a filling mechanism 24 (Fig. 7) of the character described lnmy prior Patent No. 1,964,358, issued April 18, 1933. This mechanism includesa flexible diaphragm 26 ydetachably secured at 26 to the upper end of the barrel and is actuated by a spring biased reciprocable plunger 36. A breather tube 32 completes the lling mechanism. Downward movement of the plunger 36 expands the diaphragm 26 and expels air from the reservoir, and upward movement sucks ink in to the reservoir. The operation of reciprocating the plunger 36 may be repeated as often as is necessary to flll the reservoir 22, and is taught by myprior patent. l

The specific type of nlling mechanism forms no part of my present invention, and any other suitable type may be used with equal facility.

Referring to Fig. 1, the ink feeding mechanism comprises an ink collector 34, afeed bar 36, a nib 38, and an outer shell 46. The barrel `26 is provided at its lower end with an extension 42 having a reduced outer diameter and threads at 44. (In this specification, and in the appended claims, the words lower and upper used in describing the various elements are to be considered with respect to a pen held in writing po- 'I'he shell 46 has internal threads at 46 and is adapted to be threaded onto the extension 42. A cap retaining ring 48 is `held between end 66 of the shell 46 and a 'I'he ink collector 34 is also of the type shown in the Baker patent, and functions according to the principles described thereinand also in the Wing patent to prevent flooding of the pen under varying conditions cf use. It is formed with an extension 66 which has a slip ilt in a bore 68 in the extension 42 of the barrel 26. The ink collector 34 is provided with a plurality of circumferential fins 66, the spaces between which become progressively wider toward the lower end of the collector so that when ink is taken from these spaces they empty from the lower end of the collector toward the top. The extension 66 has a flattened portion 6| to create .a'primary capillary channel in communication with the reservoir 22. A capillary ink slot 62 is cut for approximately the full length of the ink collector 34 and is in communication with the channel formed by the flat portion 6| and also with the reservoir 22. It also provides a path for ink flow between the spaces formed between the fins 66. A slot 63. wider than the ink slot 62, is formed preferably on the opposite side of the collector, and provides a path for ink flow between the spaces formed between the fins 66. The collector is bored at 64 to receive the upper end ofthe feed bar in a. sliding fit. A second and slightly larger bore 66 concentric with the bore 64 and surrounding the feed bar 36 is formed in the ink collector 34 and with the feed bar forms a channel 16, the function of which will become more f fully apparent hereinafter.

86 may be provided with a single capillary ink duct 16, as shown in Fig. 1, or two or more oi them 18'86 (Figs. 4 and 6) which out through' the frusta-conical portion 14. At the lowe': end of the feed bar the ducts 18, or II- 86,'cornmunicate with the usual slit 82 formed in the nib 38, the slit 82 terminating in an opening 84. and receiving ink, in part by way of a capillary space 88. The capillary space 86 may be formed by a at portion 88 on the end of the feed bar and beneath the nib, and may be closed at its lower end by a shoulder 86 on the feed bar, although the clearance between the nib and feed bar may provide an adequate ink conveying duct.

Ink is fed from the reservoir 22 to the writing tip by way of the capillary duct 62 in the ink collector, the spaces between the fins 66, channel '|6, ducts 'I6 (or 18-86), and 86 in the feed bar, and slit 82 in the nib. The ink in the reservoir is replaced by air from an air space 82 which bubbles its way through the ink collector 34 and air duct 63 often forcing from the spaces between the fins 66 any ink which may have co1- lected there. The air space 92 communicates with the atmosphere through a slot 94 in the underside of the feed bar 38 through the frustaconical portion 14.

The nib 3s, most c1ear1y shown in Figs. 2, 3, and V 5, has a shank 86 of frusto-conical shape, flaring outwardly toward the top through approximately one-third of its length. A longitudinal slot 88 is formed by the edges of the shank portion 86. At one side of the slot 88, one of the edges has a flange |62 bent inwardly toward the center of the shank. This flange 62 engages in a com- `plemental recess |66 in the feed bar to assure exact angular alignment of the feed bar and nib. The flange |62, by its engagement in the recess |66 at the upper end of the frusto-conica'l portion 14, also determines the position of the nib longitudinally with respect to the feed bar. The

pen nib is thus prevented from yeither angular or longitudinal displacement with respect to the feed bar and may be readily removed by flexing the nib to disengage the flange |62 from the recess I66. The nib 38 may be formed by stamping out the desired shape from a sheet and then rolling the blank thus formed in order to obtain the desired taper.

The shell 46 -is provided with a frusto-conical seat |66 into which the shank 86 of the nib 38 is wedged. 1 The seat |66 communicates with a bore |68 at the lower end of the shell-which is formed with a portion overlying the nib, but

,spaced from it to provide a space permitting flexure of the nib. Some ink retained in the capillary space I| 6 aids in maintaining the nib in condition for instant writing action.

The fountain` pen of my invention may be assembled rapidly and without requiring the services of a skilled craftsman. The ink collector 34 -f is slipped into the bore 68 at the lower end of the barrel 26. The breather tube 32 is positioned in theA bore 68 and the frusto-conical shank 86 of the nib 38 is snapped in place with the nange I 62 fitting in the recess |66. 'I'he feed bar and its associated parts are dropped into'the shell 46 l so that the shank 86 is securely wedged into its seat |66. I he shell 46 'is then screwed onto the barrel 26 with the ring 48 held in place, the feed bar sliding in the bore 64. The pen is easily disassembled for repairs or to change the pen points. After the shell has been removed, the nib may be changed by applying a drift pin or the like against a shoulder on the underside of the feed bar and gently tapping it to unseat the feed bar and nib from the-'seat |08. lIf it is 'necessary to. clean out the ink reservoir 22,.the ink collector 34 may be removed with ease. -It is thus apparent that the feed bar 36, breather .tube 32, and nib 30 constitute one assembly, while the ink collector '34 may, either be separate or may constitute a part of the barrel assembly.

In the embodiment of my invention illustrated in Figs. 7 to l1, the barrel 20 may be of unitary construction throughout its entire length, or may be of the two-part construction illustrated. The barrel has an ink reservoir 22 and a filling mechanism 24 as previously described. Themp retainer ||2 may. if required, be a split ring which may be opened up and slipped over the barrel 20. The pen is provided with an ink col.

lector ||6 which has the same' function as the collector 34, butis threaded at ||8 so as to be held in place in the shell 40.l The collector ||6 may be slotted at |22 to receive a screw driver or similar tool for positioning the collector ||6 in the shell.

A relatively narrow ink duct"|24 is cut approx"- mately the entire length of the collector II6, and

' a relatively wideair du'ct is cut across the fins 60. Because the collector ||6 is of slightly less diameter than the interior of the barrel 20. there |28 forms a capillary channel |34 which is in communication with the bore |36 'in the upper end of the feed bar through'the port |38; the breather tube '32 is pressed into the bore |36.

A bore |42 is 'formed in the lower end |40 of the shell 440 to receive the feed -bar |30 in an ink -se'aling relationship. A second and "larger bore |44 concentric with the bore |42, provides a space into which a' nib |46 maybe inserted. The nib v|46 has a straight shank portion |48 and a slot |50 in the lower-side thereof. The shank portion |48 is studded with indentations |56 which grip the end of thefeed bar when the nib is positioned thereon. If preferred, the shank portion may be provided wth a plurality'fof longitudinal ridges instead of indentations |56. The'shank-'portion |48 has a normal diameter slightly less than the diameter of the end of the feed bar andwhen the shank is placed on 'the feed bar. it must be opened slightly. The nib, therefore, grips the feed bar sufficiently to prevent its being removed or displaced unintentionally.

A capillary duct |56 extends throughout the greater length` ofthe feed bar '|30 and 'communicateswith the ink reservoir 22 through thecapillary' channel |34, capillary' duct |24, and capillary space |25. The indentations |56 space thel nib slightly away from the feed bar |30 to form' a' capillarv space v|60 under the nib which may be closed by the shoulder '|62 at the end of the feed bar and which is'in ink receiving `communication with the duct |58. The capillary space |60 maintains the nib wet while the peri. is not in use to facilitate instantwriting when needed, and also provides an' effective block to prevent leakage at this point. Air is restored to anair' space |10 from the atmosphere through the. air duct |66 which is cut in the underside of the feed-bar from the lower end thereof to a point adjacent the lower Aend of the ink collector ||6. From the air space |10 air bubbles through the collector when the pen is inv use to replace the ink.

The nib |46 may be very readily changed in this embodiment of the invention, since it is unnecessary to remove any part other than the nib. As seen most clearly in Fig. 8, the indentations |56 (or ridges, if preferred) may be placed on the shank |48 in such a manner that the nib |46 may assume only one correct angular position relative to the feed bar without slipping off. If two series of indentations |56 (or two ridges) engage the feed bar at the edges of the channel |66, the shank |48 will tightly grip the feed bar and the nib is also accurately located. If it is desired, the lower end of the feed bar may, in addition. be provided with very shallow grooves to receive the indentations |56 and thus accurately position the nib. The nib |46 may be inserted to the point at whichthe end of shank abuts against the shoulder |68 forming a wall between the bore |44 and the air space |10.

The construction shown in Fig. l2 is similar to that shown in Figs. 7 and 9, except that nib |12 is provided with a straight,`smooth shank portion |414 which is slotted -at |16 on the underside thereof. The exterior surface of the shank frictionally engages the interior surface of the bore |44. The feed bar |30 is shaped so that its lowermost tip |10 rests against the underside of the nib adjacent the writng point. The shell 40 may be relieved sufficiently adjacent the tip of the nib to permit some ilexure thereof.

The shank |14, when unconned, has :an outside diameter which is slightly greater than the inside diameter of the bore |44, and the nib is inserted between the surface of the bore |44 and the feed bar |30 by compressing it slightly while pushing it back against the shoulder |68. When the nib has been properly positioned longitudinally and angularly with respect to the bore, it may be released and the outer surface of the nib |12 frictionally eng-ages the interior surface of the bore |44 and is thus held securely in postion. The nib of this embodiment of my invention is readily removed for repairs or changing. and its manufacturing cost is low. It is to be understood, of course, that either of the nibs |46 and |12 may be mounted in a detachable shell porton similar to the shell 40, but the feed bar must be mounted relative to the ink collector H6 or 34, and not relative to a detachably mounted lower shell portion unless it is secured therein.

In the modification illustrated in Fig. 13. the ink collector 34 is spaced from the interior wall of the ink reservoir 22 slightly to provde a capillary space V|18 which is in communication with the ink reservoir 22 and the capillary duct 62. To prevent the inl:I from leaking from the reservoir 22 directly into the air space 02 below the ink collector 34, the latter s provided with n, flange |80 which has a slip iit in the shell 40 and isen'gaged by the lower end of the extension 42. The' feed bar is a sli-p fit in the bore 64 of the ink -collectcu-` 34 and the extent of the inward movement thereof may be limited by the shoulder |82. The breather tube 32 extends into the reservoir 22 through bore |84 in the collector 34 and is pressed into the bore 68 in the feed bar 36in the manner described in connection with .Adjacent the lower end of the feed bar, ay

frusta-conical Iportion |86 is formed similar to the portion '|4. The nib |88 has a frusto-conical shankportion |90 flaring outwardly toward the upper end thereof, and has a circumferential inwardly directed flange |92 which engages a shoulder I 84 forming the upper end of the conical portion |86. The shell 40 is formed in a manner similar to Fig. 1, with a frusta-conical seat |98 in to which the shank |90 and frusto-conical portion |86 of the feed bar are wedged. llf desired, interengaging means on the feed bar `and nib may be provided to determine their angular relationship. y

Ink is fed to the writing tip from the duct 16, which is in ink receiving communication with the capillary channel '|0, capillary duct 62, and capillary space |19. Air is supplied to the air space 92 from the atmosphere through a ductfeed bar assembly is then wedged into the conical seat |98 in the lower end of the shell 40. The ink collector 34 is slipped over the end of the breather tube 32 and feed bar 36 vso that its -iiange |80 slides within and engages the wall of the shell 40. 'I'he shell is then screwed on to the portion 42 of the barrel 20 and the feed bar 36 slides within the borev 64. 'I'he extension 42 of the barrel 20 forces the collector 34 into the shell 40 so that the flange |80 slides on the interior wall of the shell 40, sealing the air space 32 from the ink reservoir 22 and positioning the ink collector at the proper place within the shell 40. This assembly operation also tightly wedges the shank |90 of the nib |88 in the seat |88 from which it may be removed by placing a drift pin or the like against the shoulder 206 at the end of the air duct 204.

4In Figs. 14 and 15, I have illustrated the shock absorber" method of mounting the nib and feed bar in the lower end of the pen. As was pointed out in the introductory remarks to this specification, in the manufacture of foun- The longitudinal capillary duct 62 whichA nib is removed or changed. It is apparent that any other material which has the same characteristics may be used with equal facility, and it is not my intention to limit myself to the use of'elastic Vinylite. l v 1 In the embodiment of Fig. 14, my novel fountain pen has an ink collector 2 I0 which is mounted in the lower end of the ink reservoir-in the sam'e manner asthe collectors 84 or ||8. A feed bar 2|2 is slidably mounted in a. bore 2|4 in the collector 2|0 and carries a breather tube 2|6 secured in a bore 2|8. `A second bore 220 surrounds the feed bar and communicates with the breather tube 2|6 through a portv222 and with the ink reservoir through a capillary slot 224 cut longitudinally of the collector 2|0 and to one sideA thereof. The annular capillary Yspaces 226, which become progressively wider toward the lower end of the collector 2|0, communicate with the ink reservoir through the slot 220 and with an air space 228 formed within a shell 230, which may be similar .to the shell 40. A

The feed bar is formed with a tapered portion 232 to receive` shank portion 2,34 of a nib 236. The shank 234 is complementally tapered to engage the tapered portion 232 and is slit at 238 to permit the narrow portion of the shank to be sprung over the wider portions of the feed bar. An undercut bore 240 is provided in the lower end of the shell 230 adjacentv the air space 228, there being a shoulder 242 extending around the inner end thereof. A sleeve 244 of ink resistant, resilient material, such as Aelastic Vinylite, is inserted into the bore 240 where it is tain penswhich arev guaranteed for life or forever, itis customary to use a pen point which is stiffer and harder lthan those used in a conventional pen, to preclude their breaking, be-

coming damaged, or: wearing out during the life of the guarantee. The guaranteed pens have a very harsh feel which tires the writer more rapidly than an ordinary fountain pen. Togive the guaranteed pens the smooth writing characteristics desired in fountain pens, I mount the feed bar and nibin a shock absorber which in the embodiment shown takes the form of a sleeve of elastic and resilient material. I have found that the most desirable material for this use is elastic Vinylite because that .material resists the corrosive action of ink and retains'its elasticity even though it may be held in a deformed position for long periods of time. Furthermore, this material does not adhere to metal nor to the synthetic or plastic material from which the barrel may be made, which makes-the retained by the shoulder 242 which fits into an annular groove 246 on the sleeve. The sleeve 244 is formed with a, centrally located tapered opening 248 to grip the shank 234 of the nib, frictionally holding it in its seat.

The shell 230 is formed with an opening 260 to receive the nib 236 and the lower end of the feed bar 2|2.

'I'he feed bar' 2|2 has a capillary ink duct 252 communicating with the capillary slot 224 in the ink collector. An air duct 258 in the underside of the feed bar places the air space 228 in communication with the atmosphere. r

In assembling the pen of Fig. 14, the .nib is mounted on the assembly of the feed bar and breather tube 2|6; the resilient sleeve is inserted into the bore 240, and then the feed bar and nib arel inserted into the opening 2&0, the' tapered portion of the nib seating in the complementa1 bore of the sleeve 244.' The ink collector 2|0 may then be insertedvin the shell by sliding it over the breather tube 2| 6 and feed bar 2 I2, and the-shell then secured to the barrel. Because the Vinylite sleeve does not lose its elasticity, the nib isfirmly held in place but has imparted to it a slightly resilient feel during writing. The elasticity of the Vinlylite sleeve also renders the removal of the f eed bar and nib very simple and permits repairs to be made readily.

It will be noted that the nib, in Fig. 14 as well as in other embodiments of the invention, terminates at the entrance to the air pocket. This construction is highly `advantageous since it avoids the trouble of air-lock in the air passageway 258. 'I'he nib and feed bar may therefore .be of lesser diameter than usually considered feasible, since even in the smaller diameters the passageway 258 can be made of adequate sizeto provide a reliable unobstructed path for flow of air to the air pocket 228. The saving in the amount of gold required for the smaller size nib is substantial. f

In the embodiment shown in Fig. 15, the bore 240 in the shell 230 is provided with an annular shoulder 242, and the resilient sleeve 244 is formed `with an annular recess 260 which receives the shoulder 242. An annular flange or lip 262 engages the upper side of the shoulder 242 to secure the sleeve 244 in place. A nib 264 having a tapering shank 266 engages a tapered portion 268 on the feed'bar 2|2. I have found the most desirable taper to be approximately 11/2. The tapered shank 266 and tapered portion 266 of the feed bar are mounted in a tapered opening 210 in the sleeve 244 and are held therein, the feed bar by an internal flange 212 on the sleeve 244 and the tapered shank of the nib by the inner surface 210 of the sleeve 242. 'I'he feed bar 2 I2 is formed with the ink duct 252 communicating with the nib 264. An air duct 268 is provided on the underside of the feed bar. The assembly of this construction is similar to the construction illustrated in Fig. 14. In view of the improved writing qualities, the saving in gold necessary for .the nib, and in view of the ready replaceability of the nib, the constructions of Figs. 14 and l5 represent preferred forms of the invention.

It is not essential that the nib have the tapered shank portion in the constructions shown in Figs. 14 and 15. Instead, the shank may be cylindrical,

since the frictional grip of the elastic sleeve 244 will be adequate to hold the nib in its correct position.

The shock absorber mounting has been illustrated in connection with a pen having a shell portion which encloses the ink collector and feed bar. Other settings for this mounting may be used. For instance, the mounting may be incorporated in a more conventional fountain pen having a detachable nib holder or section, or in a pen having a unitary barrel construction.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that numerous modifications and changes may be made other than those which have ybeen described and illustrated herein. For example, I have shown several forms of constructing and mounting the pen nib relative to the feed bar and the shell, and several methods of mounting the ink collector in the barrel. It is readily understood that many combinations of these forms may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the essential ideas which I have set forth herein. I have found a nib with a very short shank portion to effect a considerable saving in material. By mounting such nib at the end of the feed bar and having the opposite end of the A feed bar projecting into the ink collector, traversing the intermediate air pocket, excellent feed of .ink to the nib is obtained. f

It will be observed that, in the various embodiments of the invention disclosed herein, the nib may be aligned with the shell, as contrasted with prior constructions in which the nib was carried yby and rotatable with the ink collector. Thus in my improved constructions the nib may readily be removed and replaced without disturbing the position of the collector.

`The embodiment of the invention shown in Fig. 12 is disclosed and claimed in my copending divisional application, Serial No. 575,043, filed January 29, 1945.

While I have shown and described particular embodiments of my invention, it will be apparent that numerous variations and modifications thereof may be made without departing from the underlying principles of the invention. I`there fore desire, by the following claims, to include within the scope of my invention all such variations and modifications by which substantially the results of my invention may be obtained through the use of substantially the same or equivalent means.

I claim:

1. In a fountain pen, the combination. of a barrel having an ink reservoir therein, an ink collector having one end positioned at the lower end of said ink reservoir, a feed bar having a sliding fit in said collector, a nib mounted at the lower end of said feed bar and spaced from said collector to provide an air space, and means placing said nib in ink receiving communication with said collector and said ink reservoir.

2. In a fountain pen, the combination. of a barrel having an ink reservoir therein, a hollow ink collector having one end positioned at the lower end of said ink reservoir, a capillary ink duct in said collector extending substantially the full length thereof, a feed bar fitted in said collector and forming therewith a capillary ink conducting means, a nib mounted at the lower end of said feed bar and spaced from said collector to provide therebetween an air space of substantial volume, and means placing said nib in ink receiving communication with saidcapillary ink conducting means.

3. In a fountain pen, the combination of a barrel having an ink reservoir therein, and an ink feeding mechanism in communication with said ink reservoir comprising, a member having `a. central opening therein, a capillary duct extending almost the full length of said hollow member and in communication with the central opening, a feed control element having one end thereof having a sliding t in said hollow member and the other end thereof protruding therefrom, the surface area. 0f said feed control element forming with the wall of said opening a capillary space, a nib mounted at the lower end of said feed control element and spaced from said member to provide an air space therebetween, and :means placing said nib in ink receiving `communication with said capillary space.

. 4. In a fountain pen, the combination of a barrel having an ink reservoir therein, an ink feeding mechanism in ink receiving communication with said ink reservoir comprising an ink collector, a capillary duct in said ink collector extending almost the full length thereof, an internal bore in said collector in communication with said duct, a feed bar having one end in said bore and forming therewith a capillary space, said feed bar being readily separable from said collector, a nib mounted at the lower end of said feed Ibar and spaced from said ink collector, and a. capillary duct in said feed bar connecting said capillary space and said nib.

5. In a fountain pen, the combination of a barrel having an ink reservoir therein, a shell portion, a nib having its shank portion enclosed within said shell portion, and an ink feeding mechanism enclosed within said barrel and said shell portion comprising, a hollow member having a. central opening therein and positioned with one end thereof in the lower end of said ink reservoir, a capillary duct in said hollow member extending approximately the length thereof and in communicationwith said opening, a feed bar projecting freely into said opening and. forming therewith a capillary space, said feed bar having a capillary groove therein and having its lower terminus adjacent said nib, said nib being spaced from said hollow member to provide an air space, a passageway connecting said air space with the atmosphere, and means placing said nib in ink receiving communication with said capillary space.

6. In a fountain pen, the combination of a barrel having an inkreservoir therein, a shell portion detachably mounted on the lower end o f said barrel, a nib receiving space formed in the lower end of said shell portion, a nib positioned in said space, and an ink feeding mechanism enclosed within said barrel and said shell portion comprising, an ink collector positioned with one end thereof in said ink reservoir and having a central opening therein, a capillary duct extending lengthwise of said collector and in communication with said opening, a feed bar extending freelyfinto said opening and forming therewith a capillary passageway, said feed bar having its lower terminus adjacent the tip of said nib and providing a capillary passageway forming the sole means for conducting ink from said collector to said nib.

7. In a fountain -pen having an ink reservoir, a hollow ink collector positioned with one end l inthe lower-end of said reservoir,'a nib, and

means mounting said nib spaced a substantial distance longitudinally from said collector and in ink receiving communication therewith comprising, a feed bar having one end thereof within said collector, means mounting said nib at the opposite end of said feed bar with the writing tip protruding beyond'the end of said feed bar, and a capillary duct in said feed bar to conduct ink from said collector to said nib.

8. In a fountain pen having an ink reservoir, a hollow ink collector positioned at` the lower end of said reservoir, a nib, a feed bar mounted with one end projecting freely into said ink collector and the other end adjacent said nib, means `for feeding ink from said reservoir to said nib,

and means for positioning said nib on said feed bar comprising, a conical shank portion on said nib, a conical portion on said feed bar adapted to be engaged by said shank portion, and means preventing longitudinal displacement of said nib relative to said feed bar.

9. In a fountain pen having an ink reservoir, a hollow ink collector positioned at the lower end of said reservoir, a nib, a feed bar mounted with one end projecting freely into said ink collector and the other end adjacent said nib, means for feeding ink from said collector to said nib, and means for positioning said nib on said feed bar with the nib spaced aA substantial distance from said collector comprising, a conical shank portion on said nib, a conical portion on said feed bar adapted to be engaged by said shank portion,

I and means preventing longitudinal and angular a conical shank portion formed on said nib, a

complemental conical portion on said feed bar receiving and engaging said conical shank, a recess in said conical portion of said feed bar, and

` means formed on said nib and projecting into said recess to prevent angular displacement of said nib relative to said feed bar;

11. In a fountain pen having an in k` reservoir,

an ink collector communicating with said reservoir, a feed bar, a nib spaced apart from said co1- lector, and means mounting said nib on the lower end of said feed'bar comprising, a conical shank portion formed on said nib, a complementa! conical portion on said feed bar receiving and engaging said co'nical shank, a shell surrounding said collector and having wedging engagement with said feed bar and nib, and means for preplemental conical portion on said feed bar having a shoulder at one end thereof and receiving and engaging said shank. and means formed on said,

nib to engage said shoulder to prevent longitudi nal displacement of said nib relative to said feed bar.

13. In a fountain pen having an ink reservoir, an ink collector, a feed bar, a nib spaced apart from said collector, and means mounting said nib on said feed bar comprising, a conical shank portion formed on said nib, a complemental conical portion on said feed bar having a shoulder at one end and receiving said' shank, a recess in said conical portion of said feed bar, and means formed on said shank to engage in said recess to prevent angular displacement of said nib relative to said feed bar and to prevent longitudinal displacement of said nib relative to said feed bar.

14. In a fountain pen, in combination, a barrel forming an ink reservoir, an ink collector communicating with said reservoir, a feed bar, a nibl spaced apart, from said collector and mounted at the lower end of said feed bar, a shell detachably mounted on` the lower end of said barrel and enclosing said ink collector, said feed bar and said nib, and means mounting said nib. comprising, a tapered seat inthe lower end of said shell, a tapered portion on said feed bar, and a tapered shank on said nib secured between said tapered seat and said tapered portion on said i feed bar.

bar, a nib spaced apart from said collector and mounted at the lower end of said feed bar, a shell detachably mounted on the lower end of said barrel and enclosing said ink collector, said feed bar and said nib, means mounting said nib comprising, a tapered seat in the lower end of said shell, a complementally tapered portion on said feed bar, and a tapered shank on said nib clamped between said tapered seat and said tapered portion on said feed bar, and means preventing longitudinal and angular displacement of said feed bar relative to said nib.

16. As a new article of manufacture, a fountain pen nib having a shank portion, said shank portion being tapered and provided with a slot throughout its length on the underside thereof, and an inwardly directed arcuate flange integral with said shank portion.

1'7. In a fountain pen, the combination of a barrel having an ink reservoir therein and an air space in a shell cup located below said ink resorvoir, a hollow ink collector disposed in said shell cup with one end in said ink reservoir and the opposite end in said air space, a feed bar with the upper end thereof projecting freely into said ink collector and the lower end protruding from the lower end of said shell, a nib receiving space formed in the lower end of said shell, a nib longi- -I nel formed between said ink collector and said feed bar to place the lower end of said feed bar and said nib in ink receiving communication with said ink reservoir.

18. In a fountain pen, in combination, a barrel with a shell having a nib receiving seat at its lower end, a complementally formed nib posi-` tioned in said seat, a feed bar securing said nib against said seat, an ink collector mounted in said barrel and freely receiving the upper end of said feed bar, said ink collector dividing said barrel into two chambers, the upper of said chambers comprising the ink reservoir, and duct means formed in said ink collector and in said feed bar to conduct ink from said reservoir to said nib.

19. In a fountain pen having a nib, a finger grip portion hollow at its upper end overlying said nib, and means mounting said nib in said finger grip portion, comprising, a bore in the lower end of said grip portion, a wall separating said bore from the upper end of said grip portion, an opening in said wall connecting said bore and the hollow upper end of said grip portion, and a feed bar extending through said opening, said nib frictionally engaging said feed bar and abutting said wall.

20. In a fountain pen having a feed bar, a nib mounted at the lower end of said feed bar, a shank portion on said nib having a longitudinal slot extending the length thereof on the underside of said nib, a plurality of inwardly projecting indentations on said shank portion engaging said feed bar to space said nib from said feed bar to form a capillary area between said nib and said feed bar.

21. As a new article of manufacture, a nib having a shank portion, a longitudinal slot in the underside of said shank portion, and a plurality of inwardly projecting indentations in said shank portion.

22. In a fountain pen, in combination, a barrel having an ink reservoir therein, an ink collector having one end thereof at the lower end of said ink reservoir, a shell portion enclosing said ink collector and mounted on said barrel, and a flange on said collector abutting the lower end of said barrel and slidably engaging the inner wall of said shell portion to position said collector within said shell portion when said shell portion is mounted on said barrel.

23. In a fountain pen, in combination, an ink reservoir, an ink collector having one end thereof in said reservoir, a feed bar, a nib mounted at the lower end of said feed bar, a shell portion enclosing said ink collector and said feed bar and overlying said nib, and a mounting for said nib carried by said shell portion including a sleeve of ink resistant resilient material gripping the shank portion of said nib.

24. In a fountain pen having a shell, a feed bar contained therein, a nib mounted at the lower end of said feed bar with the writing tip thereof protruding from said shell, and means for mounting said nib including a sleeve of ink resistant resilient material gripping the shank portion of said nib and secured in said shell portion.

25. In a fountain pen, a feed bar, a nib mounted at the lower end of said feed bar, an element surrounding said feed bar, and means mounting said nib in said element including a sleeve of ink resistant, resilient and elastic material gripping the shank portion of said nib and secured in said element.

26. In a fountain pen, a feed bar, a nib mounted at the lower end of said feed bar, an element surrounding said feed bar, and means mounting said nib in said element including a sleeve of elastic Vinylite gripping the shank portion of said nib and secured in said element.

27, In a fountain pen, a shell, a feed bar enclosed therein, a nib mounted at the Alower end of said feed bar with the writing tip thereof protruding from said shell, and means mounting said nib comprising, a tapered shank portion on said nib, a complementally tapered portion on said feed bar receiving said tapered shank, a bore in said shell adjacent the lower end thereof, a sleeve of ink resistant resilient and elastic material surrounding and gripping said tapered shank portion of said nib, and means retaining said-sleeve in said bore.

28. In a fountain pen, a shell portion, a feed bar enclosed within said shell portion, a nib mounted at the lower end of said feed bar with its writing tip protruding from said shell portion, and means mounting said nib comprising a tapered shank portion on said nib, a complementally tapered portion on said feed bar receiving said tapered shank, a bore in said shell portion adjacent the lower end thereof, a shoulder on the inner periphery of said bore, a sleeve of ink resistant resilient material in said bore, said sleeve having a tapered opening therethrough to receive and grip said tapered shank,` and means formed in said sleeve to engage said shoulder.

29. In a fountain pen, a shell portion, a feed bar enclosed within said shell portion, a nib mounted at the lower end of said feed bar with its writing tip protruding from said shell portion, and means mounting said nib comprising, a sleeve of ink resistant resilient' material in said shell surrounding and gripping said shank portion of said nib, means formed on said sleeve also to engage said feed bar, and means retaining said sleeve in said bore.

30. In a fountain pen, a shell, a feed bar enclosed therein, a nib mounted at the lower end of said feed bar, and means mounting said nib comprising a shank portion on said nib, a portion on said feed bar receiving said shank, a bore in said a complementally tapered portion on said feed bar receiving said tapered shank, a bore in said shell adjacent the lower end thereof, a shoulder on the inner periphery-of said bore, a sleeve of ink resistant resilient material positioned in said bore and having an opening therethrough to receive and grip said tapered shank, and an annular groove in said sleeve to receive said shoulder retaining said sleeve in said bore.

ARTHUR O. DAHLBERG.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification401/226, 401/250
International ClassificationB43K5/00, B43K5/18
Cooperative ClassificationB43K5/18
European ClassificationB43K5/18