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Publication numberUS2376530 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 22, 1945
Filing dateFeb 24, 1944
Priority dateFeb 24, 1944
Publication numberUS 2376530 A, US 2376530A, US-A-2376530, US2376530 A, US2376530A
InventorsDittmann Karl H
Original AssigneeJack & Heintz Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Receptacle
US 2376530 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented May 22, 194s 2,376,530

'and more 'particularly-v-tolshipping cartons, or tionship with the outer 'container by theishock packages, `and has for its primary-object to proabsorbing corner pieces and showing the upper lid vide such a construction that'A will` insurethe ofthe outer carton open and .folded outwardly. universal suspension and shock and vibration ab- 1 Figure 2 isa View in'sec'tion--taken along line sorption of the contained article so that no shocks `2-'-2 of shock absorbing corner pieces; f or vibrations imparted to the package `will be @Figure 3 is a view in perspectivev of one formiof nIarl H. Dittmann, Cleveland, hio, assigner, mesne assignments, 'to4 Jack .& H eintz,` lne.,

x' ff `c1ove1ana,ohio, aoorpor'atioo orohio V tnopuoationrobruary24,1944,'soriai-No.5233er Y' Y n `2,ci iois". A(ci. 229:14) l M c This invention-relates "in general to-'receptacles ing the inner container suspended inspaced relatransmitted t-o the article. shock absorbing corner 'piece which is cored `:'to

Departing `from the conventional practice'of increase flexibility;

employing sponge rubber pads or folded card- Figure :4 is` a topv plan .view of another-form |boards for thetop and bottom of the container, which is hollowed out with ribs; i

the present invention concerns itself with the Figure 5` is a' bottomplanf View of .the form universal suspensionand shock absorption means shown in Figure 4; andV f ".lfl withinthe container for the article to be shipped. Figure 6 is a view in 'sectien'ftaken along line In short, it contemplates the packing of the arti- 15 6--6' of Figure 4. "1 1 i t oiewithin a smau inner` container and the sus f Referring more particularly' to; the drawing. pension of `the latter within an outer container. thefarticle' to be. shipped may. 'bez'inserted' and Its particular Vadaptability andimportance is in packed within an inner container I which is connection with delicate articles such as watches, shown asf six :Sided,ibut Which may V10901: Cylinclocks and high precision instruments ysucht as dral Or any desired Shape The Outer @Ontainel' night instruments, automatic pilot units and the 2 iS symmetricallylarger than the inner- Containlike, wherein slight jars, `.vibrations and i shocks er and is shown with its top four laps;3.,x4,v `5v and 6 may readily cause misalignment, wear, breakage open and folded outwardly. i.: or other damagesuflicient to necessitate replaee- As stated before, it is desired to universally sus ment or repair. Accordingly; it is proposed, in pend the inner container with a shock and .vibraconnection with a six sided containenfor intion absorbing corner' piece .nSDaCed relationstance, to provide eight separate corner pieces of Ship 0n all Sides WthleSDeCt t0` the OllierlCOnsoft sponge or Vmolded or fabricated rubber, or the tainer. Such aieornerpiece liS ShOWn .by Way 0f l Iike, suon as synthetic rubbers, as a shock abexample in Figure 3 and may be made of soft sorbing means. Each of these shock absorbing sponge rubber molded or fabricated, or the like, corner pieces is fitted within one of the eight corsuch as synthetic rubbers. The two outer anguners of the outer y'carton and is recessed to receive lar faces 'l and 8 intersecting at the corner 9 co1'- a corresponding corner of the .inner carton in respond to the angularity of the inner corners such a manner as to resiliently suspend the `inner of the outer container. The shock absorbing carton universally in predetermined spaced relapiece may also be provided with a cut-out portionship with the outer carton. By this means, tion including a ledge I0 and inner faces II and this construction and arrangement, any shock I2` intersecting at a point I3 to correspond with imparted to the outer carton, regardless of the the outer'corners of the inner carton. direction in which it is imposed, is absorbed by In assembling the inner container within the the shock absorbing corner pieces that resiliently 40 outer container, the rst step is to place four of suspend the inner carton in complete spaced rethe shock absorbing pieces in the four bottoni lationship with respect to the outer carton. Such corners of the outer lcontainer with the ledge IIJ a spaced suspension moreover acts as a prevendisposed inwardly and facing upwardly to receive tion of moisture transfer from the exterior to the the corresponding outside corner of the inner enclosed article. container carton. Two `of such Ibottom corner With the foregoing and other objects in view, pieces are shown at I4 and I5 in Figure 2. With the invention resides in the combination of parts the inner container resting on the four bottom and in the details of construction hereinafter set corner pieces, four more pieces I6, I'I, I8 and I9 forth in the following specification and appended are placed upside down to fit within the inside claims, certain embodiments thereof being illuscorners of the outer container and engage the trated in the accompanying drawing, in which: outer edges of the inner container with each ledge Figure 1 is a top plan view of the assembly I0 resting on top of these outer edges of the inner showing the inner container suspended in spaced container. The inward folding of the naps 3, 4, 5 relationship with the outercontainer by the shock and 6 and securing of them together completes and vibrationabsorbing corner pieces and showthe double container assembly.

' bottom at 25.

As anadded feature' of obtaining shock and vibration absorption it may be preferable to calculate the outer dimensions of the inner container and the iner dimensions of the outer container and so predetermine the size of the corner vpads that upon closing. the flaps of the outer container the four pads will be placed under slight compression. In this manner when the assembly is`y subjected to shock or vibration any tendency for rebound of the inner container from one pad in any direction will be opposed by the oppositely disposed pad, or pads. This will destroy any tendency'to build up resonance or frequency of vibration of the inner container or the article contained therein.

Other specic forms, shapes and materials may be used in constructing the actual pads. For instance, while the form shown in Figure 3 is cored toinclude holes 26, certain flexible materials may be used which would dispense with the coring of the pads.

Figures 4, 5 and 6 show another form of pad; the general over-al1 contour of which conforms to that shown in Figure 3 but which is hollowed out for added flexibility and reduced weight.. In other words it still has the two side walls 1 and 8 intersecting in a corner 9 and also has a. ledge l0. t As seen in Figure 5, angular webs 29 and 30 extend between side walls 21 and 28 under ledge l0 and straight webs 3| and 32 extend between walls l' and Il and between walls 8 and l2 respectively. Such a construction tends toward` greater flexibility and the hollow under surface also provides an air cushion.

The foregoing construction and arrangement, in addition to resiliently suspending the inner container universally for shock and vibrationn absorption, also spaces the two containers to lessen the likelihood of moisture transfer from the exterior to the article contained. It also lessens the amount of shock absorbing material to be used. Moreover, the over-all weight and lsize of the cartons is materially lessened.

vsymmetrical proportions to receive said inner container, shock and vibration absorbing means for universally suspending said inner container in ,spaced relationship with said outer container,

said shock absorbing means comprising a plurality of pads, each of said padsbeing made of molded rubber of rectangular shape and thickness each to fit in each and al1 of the eight inside fcorners of the outer container and each preformed to have its inner face recessed to provide a cut-out portion in one corner thereof to provide of said outer container.

sidewalls and a ledge to receive and support each and all of the eight outside corners of said inner container to suspend and support the inner container against movement relative to said outer container except such movement as may be brought about by the compression of said pads.

2. A shipping container assembly comprising a six-sided inner container for containing an article to be shipped, an outer container of larger and symmetrical proportions to receive said inner container, shock and vibration absorbing means for universally suspending said inner container in spaced relationship with said outer container, said shock absorbing means comprising a plurality of pads, each of said pads being made of molded rubber of rectangular shape and thickness each to t in each and all of theeight inside .corners of the outer container and each preformed to have its inner face recessed to provide a cut-out portion in one corner thereof to provide sidewalls and a ledge to receive and support each and all of the eight outside corners of said inner container to suspend andvsupport'the inner container against movement relative to said outer container..r except such movement as may be brought about by the compression of said pads, said pads being pre-compressed between said innerv and outer container upon the closing KARL H. DITI'MANN;

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2560249 *Dec 23, 1948Jul 10, 1951Pulp Reproduction CompanyMolded pulp corner protector
US2656090 *Sep 10, 1947Oct 20, 1953Hamblet Marcia CNonspill powder container
US2674433 *Jul 21, 1950Apr 6, 1954Skydyne IncShock mount
US2733851 *Jul 9, 1954Feb 7, 1956 Van ness
US2993673 *Apr 11, 1958Jul 25, 1961Servo Corp Of AmericaMulti-directional shock mount
US3003656 *Apr 22, 1958Oct 10, 1961James S HardiggCushioned container unit
US3049260 *Jul 13, 1960Aug 14, 1962Stone Alton HCushioning material
US3073439 *Nov 30, 1959Jan 15, 1963Buffalo Machinery Co IncCorner protector
US3173535 *Nov 13, 1962Mar 16, 1965Republic Packaging CorpCushioned package
US3321075 *Jan 21, 1965May 23, 1967Bull Dog Lock CompanySpacer means for packaging of mirrors and the like
US3836043 *Dec 30, 1971Sep 17, 1974IttTransit/combination case shock mount arrangement
US3939978 *Jul 23, 1974Feb 24, 1976Ppg Industries, Inc.Flat glass shipping container
US5149575 *Oct 17, 1990Sep 22, 1992Soifer Martin TCorner edge bumpers
US6595367Nov 27, 2002Jul 22, 2003Sonoco Development, Inc.For a packaged product such as washers, dryers and refrigerators
DE1247609B *Nov 30, 1960Aug 17, 1967James Sutton HardiggVerfahren zur Herstellung von stossdaempfenden Eckkoerpern aus Schaumstoff
EP0569607A1 *May 9, 1992Nov 18, 1993AEG Olympia Office GmbHPackaging box with cushioning and protecting members
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/521, 206/523, 206/586
International ClassificationB65D81/05
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/056, B65D2581/055
European ClassificationB65D81/05B3C