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Publication numberUS2376716 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 22, 1945
Filing dateJun 12, 1944
Priority dateJun 12, 1944
Publication numberUS 2376716 A, US 2376716A, US-A-2376716, US2376716 A, US2376716A
InventorsOdin Frank W
Original AssigneeOdin Frank W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Telescopic structure
US 2376716 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 22, 1945. F. W, @DIN 2,376,716

TELESCOPIC STRUCTURE Filed June l2, 1944 Patented May 22, 1945 UNITED sTATEs PATENT OFFICE 2,376,716 TELEscoPIc STRUCTURE Frank W. odin, chicago, In. Application June 12, 1944, Serial No. 539,982 (ci. 287-58) 6 Claims.

This invention urelates, in general, to telescopic structures, but more particularly to improved means for locking together two telescoping members, at any desired point in their relative longi- I tudinal adjustment, quickly and eifectively.

A further object is to provide an improved locking means in which the number of parts will be reduced to a minimum, and which will be effective and eilicient in operation.

To the attainment of these ends and the a`ccomplishment of other new and useful objects as will appear, the invention consists in the features of novelty'in substantially the construction, combination and arrangement of the several parts, hereinafter more fully described and claimed, and shown in the accompanying drawing illustrating this invention, in which Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a display stand constructed in accordance with the principles of this invention.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged elevation of the locking means.

Fig. 3 is a detail sectional View taken on line 3-3, Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 isa horizontal sectional view taken on line 4 4, Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is a View similar to Fig. 4, showing the parts in a diiferent positon.

Referring more particularly to the drawing, the numeral I designates a tubular standard mounted upon a suitable base II,l and telescoping with the standard is a member I2. The standard I0 is provided with a circumferential shoulder I3 adjacent the topy thereof, and this shoulder may be formed in either by applying a sleeve I4 to the standard, which sleeve terminates a suitable' distance below the extremity I of the standard, or the standard may be externally reduced in diameter to form such shoulder.

Encompassing the portion of the standard beyond the shoulder I3, is a resilient element I6, preferably in the form of a coil spring, one end of which is anchored to the standard, and the coil is of such a length that a portion thereof will extend beyond the end' I5 of the standard.' The extremity I'I of the coil is deflected so that it will extend transversely across a portion of the extremity I5 of the standard.

The member I2 is preferably round in crosssection. and is provided with a series of recesses I8 extending transverse to the length of the member, and these recesses are arranged in spared relation throughout the length of the standard or member IIJ. The diameter of the any desired or suitable manner, I

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member I2 is such that when the two members are telescoped, it will slide freely Within the standard or member I0, and the extremity IT of the element I6 is so disposed that as the recesses I8 move in alinement therewith, the resiliency of the element I6 will cause the end I'I to enter and be seated within the adjacent recess, thereby locking the member I2 against relative adjustment with respect to the member I0.

Furthermore, the end I'I of the coil being resilient, it will enter the recess, and the bottom thereof being rlat and somewhat extended, the end I1 will prevent a relative rotation of the member I2 with respect to the member I0 under normal conditions. However, the end I'I of the spring will yield under rotary force applied to one of the members when the other member is held against rotation. As a recess approaches the end Il of the spring, the latter will snap into recess, thereby assisting in properly positioning the members in locking relation. At the same time, when the members are locked together, should any heavy object strike the end .of the member I2, there will be a slight relative longitudinal movement of the members, one with respect to the other, thereby preventing damage to the parts. i

In order to effect a relative longitudinal adjustment of themember I2 with respect to the standard or member I0, the member I2 may be axially rotated within the standard I0, from the position shown in Fig. 4 to the position shown in Fig.'5, so as -to cause the recess I8 to move away from the extremity I1 of the element I6 to unseat the latter from the recess, with `the result that, when in this position, the member I2 may be moved longitudinally with respect to the member I0.

After the desired adjustment of the members Ill and I2 has been obtained, the member I2 is again rotated within the member I0, from the position shown in Fig. 5 back to the position shown in Fig. 4, so as to position one`of the recesses I8 to receive the end I1 of the element IG. This will lock the two members against relative longitudinal adjustment, until the member IZ is moved in a direction to unseat the end I1 of the element I6, I

If desired, and in order to protect or cover the resilient element I6 and the extremity I1, there may be provided a sleeve I9 having an opening 20 in one end, of a diameter to closely t the member I2. The sleeve is telescoped over the end of the standard I 0, and may be held in position in any suitable manner, preferably by means of one end thereof resting upon a, shoulder 2l carried by the standard Ill. This sleeve I9 is readily removable when it is desired to gain access to the element I6.

While the preferred form of the invention has been herein shown and described, it is to be understood that various changes may be made in the details of construction and in the combination and arrangement of the several parts, within the scopeof theclaims, without departing from the spirit of this invention.

What is claimed as new is:

1. In a telescopic structure, the combination of an inner member provided with a series of recesses spaced longitudinally thereof, and a resilient locking member anchored to the outer member, al portion of said locking member projecting above and transversely across the adjacent end of said outer member and adapted to enter one of said recesses, to lock said members together against relative longitudinal movement and against relative rotary movement, the latter under normal conditions, one of said members being axially rotatable with respect to the other to effect such locking,V and under force to render iie'said locking member ineffective with respect to'said recesses, to permit arelative longitudinal adjustment of said members.

2. In. a telescopic structure, the combination of an inner member provided with a series of recesses spaced longitudinally thereof, and a locking member anchored to the outer member, a portion of said locking member projecting above and transversely across the adjacent end of said outer member and adapted to enter one of said recesses, to lock said members together and to permit a slight yieldingl movement of the members longitudinally, one with respect to the other, when locked, one of said members being axially rotatable with respect to the other to effect such locking, ing member ineffective with respect to said recesses, to permit a relative longitudinal adjustment of said members, said locking member comprising a resilient element encompassing said inner member, one end of said resilient element being free, said free end constituting the recess engaging portion.

3. In a telescopic structure, the combination of an inner member provided with a series of recesses spaced longitudinally thereof, a locking member anchored to the outer member, a portion of said locking member projecting above and transversely across the adjacent end of said outer member and adapted to lock said members together, said portion of said locking member also constituting a yieldable Support for the inner member, when locked. one of said members being axially rotatable with respect to the other to effect such locking, and to render the said locking member ineffective with respect to said recesses, to permit a relative longitudinal adjustment of said members, and a sleeve slidable in one direction longitudinally upon one of said members to conceal said locking member, and in another direction to expose the locking member.

4. In a telescopic structure, the combination to enter one of said recesses,

and to render the said lockof an inner member provided with a series of recesses spaced longitudinally thereof, and a locking member anchored `to the outer member, a portion of said locking member projecting above and transversely across the adjacent end of said outer member and adapted to enter one of said recesses, to lock said members together, one of said members being axially rotatable with respect to the other to effect such locking, and to render the said lockingmember ineective with respect to said recesses, topermita relative longitudinal adjustment of said members, said locking member comprising a coil spring encompass ing the end of said outer member, one end of said spring anchored to said outer member, the free end of said spring being spaced above its supporting member and extending transverse to the axis of the coil, whereby to also form a cushion between the members, when locked, and adapted to be seated and unseated in one of said recesses as one of said-members'is axially rotated with respect tothe other member.

5. In a telescopic structure, the combination of an inner member provided with a series of recesses spaced longitudinally thereof, and a coil spring encompassing and anchored tor the outer member, a portion of said locking member projecting above and transversely across the adjacent end of said outer member and adapted to enter one of said recesses, toassist in positioning and locking said members together, one of said members being axially rotatable with respect to the other to effect such locking, and to render the said locking member ineffective with respect to said recesses, to permit a relative longitudinal adjustment of said members, said inner member being substantially round in cross-section, said recesses being formed in a portion only of the periphery thereof, and extending transverse to the length of said inner member.

6. In a telescopic structure, the combination of an inner member provided with a series of recesses spaced longitudinally thereof,y a locking member anchored to the outer member, a portion of said locking member projecting above and transversely across the adjacent end of said outer member and adapted to enter one of said recesses, to assist in positioning and locking said members together against relative longitudinal movement, one of said members being axially rotatable with respect to the other to effect such locking, and to render the said locking member ineffective with respect to said recesses, to permit a relative longitudinal adjustment of said members, said locking member comprising a coil spring encompassing the end of said outer membei', one end of said spring anchored to said outer member, the' free end of saidspring extending transverse to the axis of the coil, and adapted to be seated and unseated in one of said recesses as one of said members is axially ro tated with respect to the other member, said end also constituting a, resilient support for the inner member, when the members are-locked together, and a'sleeve slidable lengthwise of said members into a position to house said spring, and out of such position to expose the spring.

FRANK W. oom.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2459785 *Apr 16, 1945Jan 25, 1949Allerton Charles ELocking device
US2519996 *Feb 9, 1948Aug 22, 1950Ralph BlakeAdjustable curtain rod
US2617660 *Jun 8, 1950Nov 11, 1952Elliot Hadlock LesterDrawbar stay for tractors
US2642251 *Oct 28, 1947Jun 16, 1953Lighting Products IncElectric lighting fixture support
US2658785 *Jan 4, 1951Nov 10, 1953Llewellyn JonesGolf ball retriever
US2671680 *Jan 19, 1951Mar 9, 1954Stevens Myron BTelescopic structure
US2675256 *Jan 19, 1951Apr 13, 1954Cornell James STelescopic structure
US2850307 *Jul 1, 1955Sep 2, 1958Bell Aircraft CorpValve stems
US2974805 *Oct 16, 1958Mar 14, 1961Jeb Rod CorpHanger rod
US3191900 *Jul 23, 1962Jun 29, 1965Commw CompanyGolf bag stand
US3236387 *Jun 30, 1964Feb 22, 1966Perini Anthony RCollapsible book rack
US3469870 *Nov 24, 1967Sep 30, 1969Charles M BarkusTelescopic structure with rotatable shaft
US3517184 *May 4, 1967Jun 23, 1970Outboard Marine CorpClamp for telescoping shaft
US3924718 *Jun 3, 1974Dec 9, 1975Kornylac CoAdjustable support
US4502393 *Jan 28, 1983Mar 5, 1985Konig & Neurath KommanditgesellschaftWorktable, particularly an office desk
US6161350 *Nov 4, 1997Dec 19, 2000Espinosa; Thomas M.Fastener assembly serving as a product, or combined with other components as a product allows automatic controlled movements in one direction and prevents movements in the opposite direction when forces are applied
US6349497Jul 20, 2000Feb 26, 2002Ed RoddenberyCollapsible support bar and bird hunting apparatus made therewith
US6494654Dec 18, 2000Dec 17, 2002Thomas M. EspinosaTie down building, system tie down, and method
US6688058Apr 19, 2002Feb 10, 2004Thomas M. EspinosaFastener assembly serving as a product, or combined with other components as a product, allows automatic controlled movements in one direction and prevents movements in the opposite direction when forces are applied
US6951078Jul 23, 2002Oct 4, 2005Espinosa Thomas MFastener assembly serving as a product, or combined with other components as a product, allows automatic controlled movements in one direction and prevents movements in the opposite direction when forces are applied
US7159366Mar 24, 2005Jan 9, 2007Espinosa Thomas MFastener assembly serving as a product, or combined with other components as a product, allows automatic controlled movements in one direction and prevents movements in the opposite direction when forces are applied
US7340867Nov 13, 2006Mar 11, 2008Espinosa Thomas MFastener assembly serving as a product, or combined with other components as a product, allows automatic controlled movements in one direction and prevents movements in the opposite direction when forces are applied
US7617642Nov 17, 2006Nov 17, 2009Espinosa Thomas MFastener assembly serving as a product, or combined with other components as a product, allows automatic controlled movements in one direction and prevents movements in the opposite direction when forces are applied
US7665258Nov 8, 2006Feb 23, 2010Espinosa Thomas MFastener assembly serving as a product, or combined with other components as a product, allows automatic controlled movements in one direction and prevents movements in the opposite direction when forces are applied
Classifications
U.S. Classification403/107, 248/407, 403/377
International ClassificationF16B7/10, F16B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationF16B7/105
European ClassificationF16B7/10B