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Publication numberUS2377066 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 29, 1945
Filing dateApr 6, 1942
Priority dateMay 10, 1941
Publication numberUS 2377066 A, US 2377066A, US-A-2377066, US2377066 A, US2377066A
InventorsGuy Harris John Edmund, John Wilson Wilfrid, William Baird
Original AssigneeIci Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleansing compositions
US 2377066 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

252. CUMPGSITlONS.

Patented May 29, 1945 UNITED exam" STATES PATENT OFFICE CLEANSING COMPOSITIONS No Drawing. Application April 6, 1942, Serial No. 437,880. In Great Britain May 10, 1941 Claims.

The present invention relates to pulverulent cleansing preparations and in particular to that kind of soap powder which also contains a bleaching agent.

It is known to mix together, to give a pulverulent preparation, common soaps; alkali salts such as sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, borax, sodium silicate, trisodium phosphate; and salts of hydrogen peroxide-yielding per-acids, e. g. sodium perborate or percarbonate.

It is known that per-acid salts of this kind are unstable in the presence of alkali and consequently pulverulent preparations of the kind referred to are liable to lose active oxygen even on dry storage and also to lose oxygen too rapidly mleacmmam c ,ove is it has been proposed to add cer- -tain magnesium salts.

According to the present invention pulverulent preparations of the kind described are rendered stable on storage and less liable to lose oxygen too rapidly in a hot aqueous cleansing bath when there is added to their ingredients 2. small proportion of a compound of the general formula wherein the File signify the same or different 0- hydroxy-aryl residues which may carry substituents such as alkyl or alkoxy and the X's signify hydrogen atoms or the same or difierent alkyl groups.

There may be added to the said pulverulent preparations, for example: bis-(o-hydroxybenzaDethylene diamine, bis-(2-hydroxy-5- methylbenzal) ethylene diamine, bis-(2-hydroxy- 3-methoxybenzal)ethylene diamine, bis-(2-hydroxy-l-naphthal) ethylene diamine or bis-(ohydroxybenzal)1:2-propylene diamine. The quantity of compound so added may conveniently be about 0.01% calculated on the weight of the said compositions but lower quantities, e, g. about 0.001% and higher quantities, e. g. 0.1%, may also be usefully employed.

The compounds to be added to the ingredients of the said pulverulent preparations according to the invention, e. g. bis-(o-hydroxybenzaD- ethylene diamine, may be added either alone or in conjunction with other compounds having also a stabilising action, e. g. diphenylguanidine, or in admixture with a diluent, e. g. sodium sulphate.

Bis- (2-hydroxy-5-methylbenzal) ethylene diamine is made by the condensation of two molecular proportions of Z-hydroxy-S-methylbenzaldehyde with one molecular proportion of ethylene diamine. Bis-(o-hydroxylbenzal, ethylene diamine and other compounds of the above general formula are similarly made by condensing together the required aldehyde or aldehydes and diamine.

The invention is illustrated but not limited by the following examples in which the parts are by weight.

Example 1 40 parts of dry soap powder, 20 parts of sodium carbonate, 10 parts of sodium bircarbonate, 5 parts of borax and 1 part of magnesium sulphate, all the materials being in a finely divided form, are mixed thoroughly together. To parts of the resulting mixture there is then added an intimate mixture of 10 parts of sodium percarbonate and 0.1 part of disalicylalethylene diamine, the whole being thoroughly mixed until it is of uniform composition.

The above mixture provides a particularly stable detergent composition. The stability thereof is tested by heating at 35 C. in a humid atmosphere. After a period of 14 days the available oxygen in the detergent composition is estimated by dissolving a sample in dilute sulphuric acid and titrating with permanganate solution, the available oxygen having been determined in the same way before the composition is heated. In this manner it is found that the detergent composition contains twice as much available oxygen after the test as it does when the disalicylalethylene diamine is omitted from the mixture.

Example 2 A detergent composition is made as described in Example 1, there being substituted for the 0.1 part of disalicylalethylene diamine an intimate mixture of 0.09 part of diphenylguanidine and 0.01 part of disalicylalethylene diamine. The detergent composition when tested in the manner described at the end of Example 1 is found to possess a similar stability to that of Example 1.

Example 3 40 parts of dry soap powder are mixed with 20 parts of sodium carbonate, 10 parts of sodium bicarbonate, 5 parts of borax and 1 part of magnesium sulphate, the materials being in a finely divided form. To 90 parts of this mixture is' added an intimate mixture of 10 parts of sodium percarbonate and 0.01 part of bis-(2-hydroxy-5- methylbenzal) ethylene diamine and the whole thoroughly mixed until uniform.

There results an especially stable detergent composition. The stability thereof is tested by determining the available oxygen before and after heating for 14 days at 35" C. in a humid atmosphere. The available oxygen is determined as described in the latter part of Example 1. In this manner the detergent composition is found to retain four times as much available oxygen after the said test as is the case when the bis- (-methylsalicylal) ethylene diamine is omitted s from the mixture.

Example 4 A detergent composition is made in the manner described in Example 3 except that there is employed in place of the bis-(S-methylsalicylal) ethylene diamine, the same weight of bis-(3- methoxysalicylaDethylene diamine. The stability of the composition when tested as described in Example 3 is found to be such that it retains twice as much available oxygen as is the case when the bis-(3-methoxysalicylal)ethylene diamine is omitted from the mixture.

Example 5 A detergent composition is made as in Example 3. 0.01 part of bis-(2-hydroxy-l-naphthal)- ethylene diamine being employed in place of the bis-(S-methylsalicylal) ethylene diamine. A composition is obtained of good stability, retaining nearly three times as much available oxygen as is the case when the bis-(Z-hydroxy-lnaphthal) ethylene diamine is not included in the mixture.

We claim:

1. A stabilized pulverulent cleansing composition comprising w; an alkali salt selected from the group which consists of sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, borax, sodium silicate, and

trisodium phosphate; an oxidizing a en t selected 1 from the group which consE'tE of sodium perborate and sodium percarbonate; and from 0.001% to 0.1% by weight, based on the total weight of said composition, of a stabilizing agent having the general formula wherein R represents an o-hydroxy aryl radical selected from the group which consists of unsubstituted o-hydroxy aryl residues, and alkyl and alkoxv ring-substituted o-hydroxy aryl radicals, said Rs being the same or different radicals, and X represents a radical selected from the group which consists of hydrogen and lower alkyl radicals.

2. A stabilized purverulent cleansing composition comprising soap; and alkali salt selected from the group which consists of sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, borax, sodium silicate, and trisodium phosphate; an oxidizing agent selected from the group which consists of sodium perborate and sodium percarbonate; diphenyl guanldine in stabilizing proportion; and from 0.001% to 0.1%, by weight, based on the total weight of said composition, of a stabilizing agent having the general formula wherein R represents an o-hydroxy aryl radical selected from the group which consists of unsubstituted o-hydroxy aryl radicals, and alkyl and alkoxy ring-substituted o-hydroxy aryl residues, said R's being the same or difierent radicals, and X represents a radical selected from .the group which consists of hydrogen and lower alkyl radicals.

3. A stabilized pulverulent cleansing composition comprising soap; an alkali salt selected from the group which consists of sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, borax, sodium silicate, and trisodium phosphate; an oxidizing agent selected from the group which consists of sodium perborate arid sodium percarbonate; and from 0.001% to 0.1%, based on the total weight of said composition, of disalicylal ethylene diamine.

4. A stabilized pulverulent cleansing composition comprising soap; an alkali salt selected from the group which consists of sodium carbonate, sodium bicaronate, borax, sodium silicate, and trisodium phosphate; an oxidizing agent selected from the group which consists of sodium perborate and sodium percarbonate; and from 0.001% to 0.1%, based on the total weight of said composition, 01 bis (2 hydroxy 5- methylbenzal) ethylene diamine.

5. A stabilized pulverulent cleansing composition comprising soap; an alkali salt selected from the group which consists of sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, borax, sodium silicate, and trisodium phosphate; an oxidizing agent selected from the group which consists of sodium perborate and sodium percarbonate; and from 0.001% to 0.1%, based on the total weight of said composition of bis-(2-hydroxy-l-naphthal) ethylene diamine.

WILLIAM BAIRD.

ARTHUR HILL.

JOHN EDMUND GUY HARRIS. STEPHEN HELLICAR OAKESHO'I'I. WILFRID JOHN WILSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2988514 *Jun 11, 1958Jun 13, 1961Olin MathiesonBleaching composition and method
US3153565 *Oct 13, 1960Oct 20, 1964DegussaProcess for the treatment of synthetic linear polycarbonamide textile fibers
US4847089 *Aug 19, 1987Jul 11, 1989David N. KramerCleansing and distinfecting compositions, including bleaching agents, and sponges and other applicators incorporating the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification510/377, 510/499
International ClassificationC11D9/42, C11D9/10, C11D9/04, C11D3/39, C11D17/06, C11D9/30
Cooperative ClassificationC11D9/42, C11D17/06, C11D9/10, C11D3/394, C11D9/30
European ClassificationC11D9/30, C11D3/39B4D, C11D9/42, C11D9/10, C11D17/06