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Publication numberUS2377651 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1945
Filing dateMay 8, 1943
Priority dateMay 8, 1943
Publication numberUS 2377651 A, US 2377651A, US-A-2377651, US2377651 A, US2377651A
InventorsLeo Roseman
Original AssigneeLeo Roseman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Compensating garter
US 2377651 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 5, 1945. L. RosEMAN COMPENSATING GARTER Filed May 8, 1943 2 Shee'ts-SheekI l June 5, ROSEMAN COMPENSATING GARTER Filed May 8, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented June 5, 1945 UNITED sTATEs PATENT oFEicE COMPENSATING GARTEB.

Leo Roseman, Newark, N. J.

Application May 8, 1943, Serial No. 486,145 vs claims. (ci. 2"--315i This invention relates in particular to hose supporters or garters for ladies wear, especially garters of the types that are associated with bodyencircling belts, girdles or corsets.

Hose supporters wherein the stocking is held at both its front and rear by elastic garter tapes which depend from the corset or belt, are unsatisfactory because unequal strains are placed upon the engaged portions of the stockings durling various positions of the body of the wearer, such as while walking, sitting or bending. Such strains cause tearing of the stocking as Well as discomfort to the wearer. The problem has become especially serious because the limitations on the use of rubber due to the war have made it necessary to nd some substitute for elastic tapes in hose supporters.

`corset or belt so that the strains placed on said -front and rear portions of each stocking shall be equalized during all positions of the body of the wearer, such as while walking, sitting or bending, and the stocking shall be held sufficiently taut at all times to prevent its slipping down.

My invention especially contemplates a flexible. non-elastic connector such as a tape that has its ends connected to the front and rear portions of the stocking and has its intermediate portion slidable in a guide on said corset, girdle or belt, so that, for example, as the rear end of the tape is pulled downwardly by sitting or bending of the body of the wearer, the front end will be pulled upwardly, whereby the downward pull at the rear is compensated by relaxation of the tension at the front and the strains at the front and rear engaged portions of the stocking are equalized. In such devices, however, certain portions of the tape must slide relatively to the skin or underclothing of the wearer and the friction thus produced is undesirable; in fact such rubbing of the tape over the skin might result in painful chafing or abrasion of the skin. Similar conditions are also incidental to use `of shoulder straps on certain gements.

Accordingly other objects'of my invention are to provide a compensating hose supporter of the general character described or a shoulder strap or the like which shall include novel and improved means for preventing direct contact of the aforesaid tapes or straps with the skin or underclothing of the wearer; and thus to enclose the tape or the portions thereof which otherwise might contact with the body of the wearer, within a longitudinally extensible and contractible, iiexible tubular housing so that said tape may slide through said housing and the latter may extend and contract to accommodate longitudinal movement of the tape. y

A further object is to provide in such a compensating garter a novel and improved guide and support for said tape to encircle the body; which shall ensure free sliding of the tape with a minimum of friction; which is devoid of met-al parts; which can be formed of fabric easily and inexpensively on automatic machines and shall be strong and durable; whichV shall permit easy threading of the tape therethrough to facilitate adjustment, renewal and repair of the parts; and

which shall permit adjustment of the tape relative to the guide so that the end portions of the tape can be caused to depend from the guide at different positions circumferentially of the latter, whereby said end portions can be connected to the stocking at the points most suitable to the comfort and convenience of the wearer.

A further object is to provide a guide of the character described for an equalizing or compensating hose supporter which shall comprise a strip of fabric in the nature of a belt, smooth and devoid of projections or protuberances and which shall have a channel to extend girthwise of the body in which said tape may be nested and may freely slide smoothly and without bulging.

Another object is to provide a compensating hose supporter of this character which shall include a novel and improved quick-detachable connection between the guide and the compensating or equalizing tape, so that if desired the ends of the tape can be permanently connected to the stocking and the stocking can be disconnected from the guide by simply lifting the tape out of the guide.

Other objects, advantages and results of the invention will be brought out by the `following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which: Y

Figure l is a perspective view of a compensating hose supporter embodying my invention.

Figure 2 is a perspective view of the hose supporter, on a reduced scale, showing the manner of applying it to the body which is illustrated in standing position.

Figure 3 is a side elevational view of the hose supporter showing it applied to the body which is illustrated in a seated position.

' Figure 4 is a greatly enlarged transverse vertical sectional view on the line 4 4 of Figure 1.

Figures 5 and 6 are fragmentary vertical sectional views on the lines 5 5 and 6 6 respectively of Figure 1.

Figure 7 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of the front portion of the hose supporter shown in Figure 3.

Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure l showing a modification of the invention.

Figures 9 and 10 are fragmentary vertical sectional views on the lines 9 9 and Ill-lll of Figure 8, respectively.

Figure 11 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a modiiicationof the guide for the equalizing tape.

Figure 12 is a similar view of another modification,

Figure 13 is a transverse vertical sectional view on the line I3 I3 of Figure 12.

Figure 14 is a view similar to Figure 5 showing a modication of the tubular exible housing structure and Figure 15 is a fragmentary perspective view of a modification of the means for connecting the equalizing tape.

Specifically describing the invention. the hose supporter includes a support A to encircle the body above the hips, in which is mounted an equalizing garter B for each stocking to be connected at spaced points in its length to the stocking, so that the equalizing garter and the support may freely move relatively to each other to compensate for various positions of the body such as those occuring during walking, sitting and bending.

The support A may constitute the lower edge of a girdle or corset, or as shown, may comprise a belt. Preferably the belt comprises a length of textile fabric I which has its longitudinal edge portions turned inwardly at 2. A plurality of guide elements such as the cross strips 3 of fabric are secured to the main strip I in spaced relation circumferentially or lengthwise of the strip in a row. The cross strips 3 are secured at spaced points in their lengths to the main strip I as by lines of stitches 4 and the portions of the cross strips between the stitches 4 are free and spaced from the main strip I as clearly shown in Figure 4. 'I'he cross strips thus serve as guide elements for the equalizing garter B.

Each of these garters isshown as comprising a length of suitable woven fabric tape or other material 5 which is threaded between certain of the cross strips 3 and the main strip I with each end of the tape projecting from the belt between two adjacent cross strips 3 as shown in Figure l. Preferably the ends of the cross strips 3 are located between the main portion and the intumed edge portions 2 of the strip I so that said inturned edge portions provide a channel between them in which the tapes 5 are nested and slidable. With this construction the belt is smooth and devoid of projections or protuberances. The belt may include also a reenforcing or backing strip Ia which may be of cushioning material, if desired.

The end portions of each tape are so related to the belt that when the belt is applied to the body one of said end portions will be located at the front of the body while the other end portion will be located at the rear of the body, and as shown by Figure 1 suitable clasps 6 may be attached to the ends of the tapes for connecting thetapes to the corresponding stocking C. If desired, the end of the tape may be directly connected to the clasp and have a suitable adjusting `device 1, or the end of the tape may be attached to a tab 8 which may be either elastic or inelastic and has the corresponding clasp 6 attached thereto in the usual manner.

Suitable means may be provided for attaching the belt to and removing it from the body, but as shown, one end of the belt has hooks 9 which cooperate with cross strips I0 similar to the cross strips 3, beneath which the hooks 9 may be engaged for connecting the ends as shown in Figure 2.

When the belt is applied to the body, the clasp 6 at the front of each equalizing garter B is connected to the front portion of the corresponding stocking while the clasp 6 at the rear end of the tape is attached to the rear portion of the stocking. The length of the tape initially will be adjusted to snugly hold the stocking in its proper position when the body is erect, as shown in Figure 2.

As the body moves from one position tc another, the equalizing tapes 5 will slide relatively to the belt A through the guideway provided by the strip I and the cross strips 3 so as to equalize the strains and pulls on theportions of the stocking to which the clasps 6 are connected. For example, as shown in Figure 3 when the body is in seated'position the rear end portion of the tape is pulled through the guideway in the belt and this pull is compensated by the relaxation of the forward end portion of the tape. As the body is moved into upright position, the forward end ot' the equalizing tape will be pulled and the rear end portion will be simultaneously relaxed so as to again equalize the strains exerted on the stocking by the clasps 6.

To prevent direct contact of the equalizing tape with the skin or the under-clothing of the wearer during such movements of the body I provide a tubular, flexible housing through which the tape is threaded loosely for relative sliding movement.

As shown in Figure 1, this flexible housing is designated II and has its forward and rear ends iixedly secured to the forward and rear end portions respectively, of the tape 5 as by stitches I2. The tubular housing extends throughout the guideway so that the equalizing tape may slide through the housing.

Preferably the housing comprises a exible. extensible and contractible material such as a bias woven fabric tube, for example a tubular woven lace, whose normal cross-sectional area i. e. before extension or contraction, is considerably greater than that of the tape. Also the tubular housing preferably is of a normal length greater than the distance between the points of connection I2 thereof to the tape, so that the housing may extend and contract as shown in Figures 3 andI 5 to accommodate movement of the equalizing tape incident to movement of the body.

As shown in Figure 3, the forward portion of the tubular housing is held against movement at the point where it enters the guideway in the belt and has collapsed or contracted between that point and the clasp 6, while the rear portion of the housing has extended or elongated.

of the belt together The housing thus ensures against rubbing of the equalizing tape on the skin or underclothing of the wearer in such arnanner as might cause chaflng or abrasion of the skin or undue wearing of the underclothes, and the housing does not in any way interfere with or hinder free operation of the equalizing tape.

It will be observed that the extension and contraction of the tubular housing' initially will occur at the points where there is the least resistance, i. e. where there is the least frictional contact of the housing with the body; and consequently those portions of the housing which are pressed against the body, for example at the crest of a curve, will remain stationary and effectively protect the body against rubbing by the tape or by the housing unless and until a body movement of exceptional magnitude requires extension or contraction of such portions of the housing to compensate the movement of the tape.

A modification of the invention is shown in Figures 8 to 10 inclusive where the belt D is in general similar to the belt A and has the cross pieces I3 corresponding to the cross pieces 3 to form guideways for the equalizing tapes I4. In this form of the invention, the tubular housing does not extend throughout the length of the guideways. n the contrary, the tubular housing I8 for the forward end portion of each equalizing tape I4 has one end xedly secured to the belt as by stitching I5 and its other end portion attached by a short flexible tape I6 to the stocking engaging device I1 to which the equalizing tape is connected in the manner hereinbefore described. The ends of the tie-tape I6 are attached to the housing IB and to the stocking engaging device I1 as by the respective stitches |60 and IGI.

However, if desired the tubular housing may have one end fixedly connected to the belt and its other end unattached to the equalizing tape.

This is shown on the rear end portion of thel equalizing tape illustrated in Figure 8 where the tubular housing I9has one end secured to the belt at 20 and the other end simply turned inwardly to prevent fraying as indicated at 2I.

` The operation of both forms is about the same, the two housings I8 and I9 extending and contracting yto accommodate longitudinal movements of the equalizing tape. However, the short tie-tape I6 will positively pull and extend the tubular housing I8 as the forward end portion of the equalizing tape is pulled forwardly, whereas the housing I9 generally will simply follow the movement of the equalizing tape by frictional contact between the two.

If desired, the ends of the equalizing tape may be permanently connected to the corresponding stockings and the tapes may be quickly detachable from the guideway in the belt. For example, as shown in Figure 11 the guide in the belt may comprise a plurality of hooks 22 which are secured to the belt in spaced relation circumferentially thereof and have their mouths opening upwardly so that the equalizing tape 23 may be inserted into and removed from the hooks through said mouths. With the ends of the equalizing tape attached to the stocking it will be seen that in order to detach the stocking from the belt it is simply necessary to remove the equalizing tape from the hooks 22.

. Another structure for accomplishing this same result is shown in Figures 12 and 13 where the guide comprises a plurality of eyes or loops 24 which are separably connected to the belt in spaced relation circumferentially thereof and have the equalizing tape 25 threaded therethrough. l

As shown the belt comprises a strip of fabric 26 which has one longitudinal edge portion returned upon the main portion as at 21 and a plurality of stitches 28 passing through the re-` turned portion and the main portion in such a manner as to form gaps or pockets 29 to receive the bills 30 of the hooks which are connected to the loops or eyes 2l.

With the structure embodying the invention I it will be observed that the guide for the equalizing tape is strong and durable and can be economically produced on automatic machines. There is a minimum of friction between the equalizing tape and the guide, and the tape can be easily threaded into and removed from the guide. The belt is smooth and the equalizing tape is neatly nested in the guideway so that it may slide freely and comfortable without wrinkling or bulging. 'I'he tubular housing prevents frictional contact of the equalizing tape with the body of the wearer so as to prevent injury to the skin or the clothing; and at the same time where the tubular housing extends through the guideway, it serves as a guide surface for the equalizing tape and ensures a minimum of friction as the result of relative movement of the belt and the equalizing tape.

It will also be observed that should the equalizing tape become broken the tubular housing will prevent dropping of the stocking low enough to cause embarrassment.

The invention eliminates the necessity for elastic tapes although if desired, short sections of elastic may be utilized between the equalizing tape and the stocking engaging clasps.

The spaced cross strips provide a plurality of lateral openings for the guideway through which the tape may be threaded selectively to permit proper relationship between the points of connection of the tape to the stocking andi the points at which the tape projects from the guideway; for example, it allows the front and rear end portions of the equalizing tape to be moved to the right or to the left to permit the tapes to be connected to the stockings at points most comfortable and convenient to the wearer.

It will be evident to those skilled in the art that the guide and the equalizing tapes could be mounted on the lower edge of a long-line brassire, if desired, instead of upon the belt A or upon a corset or girdle. With such an arrangement the tapes would prevent upward. slipping of the brassire.

In many cases it may be desirable to utilize two tubular flexible extensible and contractible housings 3I and 32 which are telescopically associated with each other as shown in Figure 14. The two housings may be of different lengths so' that they may move relatively to each other as the corresponding equalizing tape is longitudinally moved. This structure is particularly advantageous in that it restrains or reduces the buckling or wrinkling of the housings which is incident to movement of the equalizing tape as illustrated in Figures 3 and 7.

In all forms of the invention shown, when applying the tubular housing to the tape, it is desirable rst to thread the tape through the housing, then hold one end or one point in the length of the housing in fixed relation to the tape. whereupon the housing is stretched to its limit over the tape. Then the housing is contracted or buckled by pushing the free portion thereof toward the above mentioned xed point a distance approximately equal to the distance that the tape must move to accommodate movement of the body of the desired magnitude. Then the housing at its free end or at ,a point in spaced relation to the first-mentioned iixed point is secured to the tape.

In order to distribute the strains imposed upon the stocking by the means for attaching the equalizing tape to the stocking, I may secure a loop 33 adjacent the top edge of the stocking as shown in Figure 15, said loop to be separably engaged by a suitable hook 34 which is attached to the equalizing tape 35 in any suitable manner. The loop is secured at distantly spaced points 36 as by stitching to the stocking so that the strains from the equalizing tape are applied to the stocking at the two points 36 of attachment of the loop to the stocking. Any other suitable form of loop may be utilized and the loop could be secured to the stocking in any suitable way as will be understood by those skilled in the art.

Furthermore, it will be readily understood that the different ways of attaching the tubular housing to the guide and to the equalizing tapes may be utilized in various combinations other than those shown and specifically described; and while I have shown the invention as embodied in various details of structure, the construction of the hose supporter may be modied and changed by those skilled in the art within the spirit and scope of the invention.

What I claim is:

l. A compensating hose supporter comprising a support including means for attaching it to the body, a tape to be connected at spaced points in its length to a stocking, said support having a guideway through which the portion of said tape between said points is slidable to permit free relative movement of the body and said tape during walking, and a tubular, flexible, extensible and contractible housing connected to said support and extending throughout said guideway with a portion projecting beyond each end of said guideway, said tape being slidable through said housing, whereby said housing prevents direct contact of said tape with the body and with the clothing of the wearer.

2. A compensating hose supporter comprising a support including means for attaching it to the body, a tape to be connected at spaced points in its length to a stocking, said support having connected thereto a guideway including a tubular bias woven extensible and contractible fabric tube having its end portions extending beyond said support, the portion of said tape between said points being slidably threaded through said tube to permit free relative movement of the body and said tape during walking, bending or sitting.

3. A compensating hose supporter comprising a support including means for attaching it to the body, a tape to be connected at spaced points in its length to a stocking, said support having a. guideway including a tubular extensible and contractible fabric tube having its end portions extending beyond said support, the portion of said tape between said points being slidably threaded through said tube to permit free rela.- tive movement of the body and said tape during walking, bending or sitting, and a plurality of guide elements separably attached to said support in circumferentially spaced relation and in which the portion of said tube between said points is mounted.

LEO ROSEMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2435311 *Aug 7, 1945Feb 3, 1948Kimmell Geraldine MGarter belt
US6058514 *Nov 4, 1998May 9, 2000Hart; KarinButtocks support device
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/315, D02/625
International ClassificationA41F11/02, A41F11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41F11/02
European ClassificationA41F11/02