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Publication numberUS2378852 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 19, 1945
Filing dateMay 27, 1943
Priority dateMay 27, 1943
Publication numberUS 2378852 A, US 2378852A, US-A-2378852, US2378852 A, US2378852A
InventorsJames Robert H
Original AssigneeRobert H Jamison
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable table and like furniture
US 2378852 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 19, 1945. R. H. JAMES 2,378,852

ADJUSTABLE TABLE AND LIKE FURNITURE Filed May 27, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 June 19, 1945.

w 2/ LE.

ADJUSTABLE TABLE AND LIKE FURNITURE R. H. JAMES 2,378,852

'2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented June 19, 1.945

ADJUSTABLE TABLE AND LIKE FURNITURE Robert H. James, University Heights, Ohio, as-

signor to Robert H. Jamison, Cleveland, Ohio Application May 27,

Claims.

This invention relates to furniture of the table class and particularly to tables the tops of which can be raised and lowered to different heights.

The invention has particular application to ornamental tables suitable for use in the home and which by the practice of the invention may be changed from a height suitable for use as a card table or the like to 18. height suitable for use as a cocktail table, coffee table, etc.

The invention comprises an improved construction of telescoping leg, having an improved mode of operation by which the length thereof may be changed for the purposes mentioned.

The primary object of the invention is to provide a table having a telescoping'leg construction which may be operated to change its table top supporting length, by mechanism wholly concealed within the structure.

Another object is to provide a table or like leg of the telescoping type having improved means for changing its length.

Another object is to provide a leg, for tables or the like, comprising telescoping parts, and a mechanism to change the working length of the leg operable by telescoping movements of the two parts.

Other objects will be apparent to those skilled in the art to which the invention appertains. The invention is fully disclosed in the following description considered in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a table embodying m invention and with the legs elonsated;

Fig. 2 is a view of the table of Fig. 1 with the legs shortened;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view of the upper end of a leg of the table of Fig. 1, showing the preferred arrangement for detachably securing the leg to the table top;

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal sectional view of a leg of the table in the shortened condition of Fig. 2, illustrating a mechanism within the leg structure:

Figs. 5, 6, 7. and 8 are views similar to Fig. 4 illustrating the mode of operation of the leg mechanism.

Fig. 9 is a longitudinal sectional view taken from the plane 9--9 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 10 is a cross sectional view taken from the plane Ill-40 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 11 is a longitudinal sectional view taken from the plane llll of'Fig. 4;

Referring to the drawings, Figs. 1 and 2, I have shown a table embodying my invention, compris- 1943, Serial No. 488,660

ing a top shown generally at I, and, legs 4-4; the legs comprising each a stem portion 3, and a sleeve portion 2 telesco-palble over the stem Dortion. In Fig. 1 the legs are shown extended and supporting the top I of the table at a suitable height for playing games thereon or for like usage; and in Fig. 2, the legs are shown telescoped to a shortened length and supporting the table top I at a lower height suitable to serve as a coffee table, cocktail table or the like.

In cross sectional shape, the legs may be rectangular or oval or of streamlined contour for appearances sake. but for simplicity of illustration and description herein, they are of square section.

It is desirable to have the legs detachable from the top so that they can be packed compactly for shipping and one means for doing this is shown in Fig. 3, in which the top panel proper is removed. The sides 55 of the table top I are tied together by a diagonal element 6 having a recess 1 therein which fits the leg stem 3; and theleg stem is bolted thereto by a bolt 8 rigidly seating the leg in the recess 1 but allowing it to be detached and removed upon removing the bolt 8.

The other figures of the drawings show a mechanism concealed within the leg structure by which the legs may be extended to support the table top as in Fig. 1 or shortened to support it as in Fig. 2 and this will now be described.

The stem portion 3 of the leg substantially fits within the lower or sleeve portion 2 with enough clearance to allow it to slide freely therein.

The sleeve portion may conveniently b made of four pieces as shown in Fig. 10 at 99, joined by tongues Ill-l0.

In the lower portion of the stem 3 is a transverse bore I l in which reciprocates a pin l2, the pin being spring pressed outwardly by a sprin 13 so that the outer end of the pin engages and slides along and upon the inner wall M of the sleeve when the stem 3 is reciprooated in the sleeve.

In the upper portion of the sleeve is a recess l5 open toward the stem and of substantial vertical extent for a purpose to be described.

Communicating with the bore Ill mentioned above is an elongated recess l6 extending above and below the bore for a purpose to be described,

and opening toward the wall ll of the sleeve.

Associated with recess I5 is a tumbler I! pivoted on a shaft l8 and this shaft as shown in Fig. 10 may conveniently be lodged in a bore extending all the way through one of the sleeve pieces 9, and

telescopingly shortened condition'of Fig. 2, the

lower end of the stem resting upon a bottom or closure of the sleeve 2.

The operation of the mechanism legs to the condition of Fig. l, and to again telescope them to the condition of Fig. 2 when desired, will now be described.

In general, the legs may be extended by rasping the table top and raising it to raise the leg stem and allow the sleeves to move downwardly b gravity; or, alternatively, the table may be rocked over sidewise on two of the legs and the sleeves of those legs grasped and pulled downwardly, and then the other two legs similarly lengthened by pulling down their sleeves. In

.either mode of operation, the stem 3 has upward movement relative to the sleeve 2 and will be so described. The stem carries the pin l2 therewith, sliding it along the inner wall ll of the sleeve 2.

As the pin l2 slides, upwardly it is projected by the spring l3 outwardly into the shallow reto extend the cess I!) as shown in Fig. 5. The shoulder 20 which stops downward rotation of the tumbler ll, disposes the free end thereof in engagement with or adjacent to the stem 3 as shown in Figs.

- 4 and 5, so that when the pin i2 moves into the shallow recess IS the end of the pin is under the end of the tumbler, as shown in Fig. 5.

As the stem and pin continue to move upwardly, the pin raises the tumbler and is spring pressed into the recess l5 and snaps thereinto and will emit a slight clicking sound as indicating that it has reached this position, and the movement of the stem 3 may then be stopped; and the stem 3 will now be prevented from moving downwardly by engagement of the pin 92 with the shoulder 22 constituting the lower end of the recess 85 and the stem will therefore support the table top at this elevation of the stem.

It will be noted in Fig. 6 that the tumbler H has now been rocked by the pin around its pivot l8 and rests from the upper side of the pin.

If now it be desired to again telescopingly collapse the legs to shorten them into the length of Fig. 2, the following operation is performed. The stem 3 is moved upwardly still farther, that is to say, beyond the position of Fig. 6 to which it was moved for the high table, and this causes the pin l2 in traveling upwardly with the stem to rock the tumbler I1 upwardly, the pin taking up successive positions indicated in dotted; line at HA and MB in Fig. 7, and finally arriving at the solid line position of Fig. 7, and as it moves it rocks the tumbler I! to the position of Fig. '7.

It will be noted that in thus rocking the tumbler, the tumbler projects inwardly toward the stem 3 and its free end is given clearance by the recess it into which it projects. In its fully rocked position, the tumbler engages the shoulder 2| which limits its rocking movement.

It is immaterial whether the tumbler stays in this position or whether due to looseness at its acres v M nvotit drops by gravity toward its original tion.

Upward further movement 0! the stem is finallyutoppcd by the man messing the shoulder 2! at the upper end or therecess ll.

Having thus beyond its W table position described, and thereby bringing th pin l2 above the tumbler, the stem 3 is now lowered again carrying the pin l2 downwardly with it. The pin l2 then engages the tumbler l1 and rocks it around toward its original position as shown in Fig. 8.

The pin as indicated in dotted line in Fig. 8 at I20 rocks the tumbler to the dotted line position of that figure which will be seen to be its original position where it is again stopped by the shoulder 20, and further downward movement 0! the stem 3 causes the pin to be pushed back into its recess by riding over the tumbler, whereby upon continued downward movement of the stem 2, the end of the pin will again slide upon the wall ll of the sleeve and return to its original position of Fig. 4.

It will be observed that the outer end of the pin when opposite the recess l5 rides along upon the bottom 24 of the recess except when it is moved back into'its recess by sliding on the tumbler l1,

The above described movement to shorten the leg may be eil'ected by grasping the table top and raising all four legs off of the floor and giving a quick jerking movement to the table top which will have the effect of causing the sleeve portions 2 to drop by gravity from the position of Fig. 6 to the position of Fig. 7; and then the sleeve portions may be set again upon the floor and the stems 3 pushed downwardly therein to cause the parts to go from the positionof Fig. 7 to that of Fig. 8 and back to the position of Fig. 4; or alternatively the table may be rocked over on two of the legs at a time, raising two of the sleeves at a time oil of the floor and the raised sleeves may be grasped and first moved downwardly to move the parts from the position of Fig. 6 to that of Fig. 7, and then pushed upwardly to cause the parts to go to the position of Fig. 8 and then to the position of Fig. 4.

It will be observed that all of the parts of the mechanism are entirely concealed within the leg structure and that the operation of lengthening the legs to their long working positions consists merely of telescoping them outwardly to a predetermined extent; and that to shorten the legs the operation consists merely of first, telescoping them outwardly beyond the said predetermined length and then telescoping them inwardly. Y

In the specific disclosure, illustrated and above described, the pin i2 is on the stern, and the recess I5, tumbler ll etc. are on the inner wall of the sleeve. It will be obvious, however, that this relation may be reversed, and that the pin.

mged the leg stem .2 upwardly d tion telescopingly movable therein, to change the length of the leg; one or said portions being secured at an end thereof to the table top, and the leg having a telescopingly shortened length at which it supports the table top at a predetermined low height; a shoulder associated with the inner wall of-the tubular portion: a movable abutment carried by the stem portion and springpressed to move to overlap and engage the shoulder upon telescopingly lengthening the leg to a predetermined extent, to prevent shortening of the leg and to cause the leg to support the table top at a predetermined greater height; a device movabiy mounted on the tubular portion over which the abutment rides upon telescopingly lengthening the leg to a still greater extent and which device is movable by the abutment to a position in which it overlaps the shoulder and prevents engagement of the abutment with the shoulder upon thereafter telescopingly shortening the leg;

9, pin carried by one portion and spring pressed into sliding engagement with the other portion; a shouldered recess associated with the other portion into which recess the pin is spring-projected when the leg is lengthened to a predetermined extent; a rockable tumbler carried by the said other portion and disposed in the path of the pin, and formed to cause the pin to yieldingly retract and pass thereover upon further lengthening the leg; and the tumbler being rockable by the pin into a position to cause the pin to retract and ride thereover, and over and beyond the recess, upon thereafter shortening the leg.

3. A leg for supporting a table top or the like at two different heights, comprising an outer sleeve part and an inner stem part telescopable with each other to change the length of the leg; mechanism associated with the two parts and entirely concealed within the outer sleeve part and operable by telescoping movements of the two parts; the mechanism comprising a spring pressed abutment means on one part engageable with a recess shoulder on the other part, upon telescopingly lengthening the leg to a predetermined extent, to prevent telescopingly shortening the leg; and comprising an element on the said other part over which the abutment rides upon further telescopingly lengthening the leg; the said element being movable by the abutment, upon thereafter telescopingly shortening the leg, to a position in which it overlies the shoulder and prevents the abutment from engaging the shoulder, to permit the leg to be telescopingly shortened.

4. A leg for supporting a table top or the like at two different heights, comprising two parts telescopable with each other to change the length of the leg; mechanism actuated by telescoping movements of the leg parts, comprising shoulder and abutment means on the two parts respectively, mutually engageable by telescopingly lengthening the leg to a predetermined long length to prevent the parts from telescopically shortening; and comprising movable means supported by one part, and movable, by lengthening the leg to a still greater extent and then telescopingly shortening it, to bridge the shoulder and prevent engagement of the shoulder and abutment means, to permit the leg to be shortened to a predetermined short length.

5. A leg for supporting a tabletop or the like at two different heights, comprising two parts telescopable with each other to change the length of the leg; mechanism actuated by telescoping movements of the leg parts, and comprising shoulder and abutment means on the two parts respectively, rendered mutually engageable by telescopingly lengthening the leg to a predetermined long length to prevent shortening of the leg; and comprising an element movable to prevent said engagement by first lengthening the leg beyond said predetermined long length and then shortening the leg; to thereby permit the leg to be shortened to a predetermined short length.

ROBERT H. JAMES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2599020 *May 31, 1951Jun 3, 1952Safstrom Alden LVertically adjustable table
US2643922 *Apr 13, 1951Jun 30, 1953Rudman Edward GVertically adjustable table top
US2685486 *Aug 24, 1949Aug 3, 1954Simmons CoTiltable table top structure
US2702222 *Apr 10, 1951Feb 15, 1955Babee Tenda License CorpExtensible table leg or the like
US2710239 *Jun 15, 1953Jun 7, 1955Friedrich LobendankVertically adjustable leg structure
US2722970 *Jan 2, 1952Nov 8, 1955William C UphoffExtension for a tubular chair leg
US2746822 *Feb 21, 1955May 22, 1956Copenhaver Roy TAdjustable table legs
US2875008 *May 9, 1955Feb 24, 1959Herman C AngstreichRotatable leg hinge and cover for table
US2978712 *Jul 29, 1959Apr 11, 1961Eugene Blanke NathanAdjustable furniture leg
US3043641 *Sep 26, 1958Jul 10, 1962De Witt W HanmoreAdjustable supports
US3595180 *Feb 10, 1969Jul 27, 1971Module Computer CorpAdjustable height device for data processing equipment
US4451084 *Dec 14, 1981May 29, 1984Simmons Universal CorporationBackrest height adjustment for office chair
US4860668 *Apr 19, 1988Aug 29, 1989Visita Mtc Ltd.Movement-controlled locking mechanism, particularly for movable support tables or platforms
US5769005 *Sep 28, 1995Jun 23, 1998Haynes; RobinAdjustable length table leg for a massage table
US7866268 *Mar 6, 2007Jan 11, 2011Steelcase Inc.Height adjustable leg assembly
US7866291Feb 22, 2008Jan 11, 2011Ford Global Technologies, LlcCamshaft phaser for internal combustion engine
US8904714 *Apr 6, 2011Dec 9, 2014Big Astor S.R.L.Modular pedestrian tunnel
US8967054May 31, 2012Mar 3, 2015Kimball International, Inc.Office desking system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification403/80, 108/146, 403/107, 248/188.5
International ClassificationA47B9/08, F16B7/16, F16B7/00, A47B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B9/08
European ClassificationA47B9/08