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Publication numberUS2379079 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 26, 1945
Filing dateMay 18, 1942
Priority dateMay 18, 1942
Publication numberUS 2379079 A, US 2379079A, US-A-2379079, US2379079 A, US2379079A
InventorsHayward Landes H
Original AssigneeHayward Landes H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Well cementing device
US 2379079 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 26, 1945. l.. H. HAYWARD WELL CEMENTING DEVICE Filed May 18, 1942 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 7A N055 HI H'A VWA eo,

r lNvENr'oR ATTORNEY June 26, 1945. L. H. HAYWARD WELL CEMENTING DEVI GE Filed May 18, 1942 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 LANDES HH YwAeo,

INVENT R ATTORNEY Patented June 26, 1945 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,319,079' v WELL cmiEN'rnvG DEVICE Landes H. Hayward, Los Angeles, Calif. Application Mayls, 194 z,- serial No.` 443,386

(ci. 1st-7.1";A

, ofothecasing couplings. This is primarily due s claims.

This invention relates to the cementing oil wells, and more particularly to 'the provision of an opening in the casing for introducing cement behindrthe vwalls of the casing, which opening' can be controlled from the surface of Athewell.

' An opening through acasing wall can be controlled by movement of the portion of' the casing which extends to the surface. Previous devices which utilize the movement of the casing for controlling the opening through the wall of the casing suffer various disadvantages. Some of them require that the casing. be rotated through aceri tain definite angle in order that ports through relatively rotating members be brought into alignment to permit the flow of cement through the openings into the space behind the casing. With a long string of casing extending to the surface it is oftentimes dimcult to assure that the part secured to the casing rotates the required amount to open and close the port in the required manner.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a valve in the length of the casing which can be controlled without accurate control of the rotative movement of the casing extending -to the surface.

vide a casing valve which is reliable despite up' ward and downward movement of the casing from lthe surface during'cementing operation at a stage below the valve.

coupling used in the casing. Itis still a furtherobject of the present inven'- It is a further object of the present invention to provide a casing valve whichis not eiected by changes in temperature along the length of the casing causing the casing to expand and contract.

It is another object of the present invention to produce a casing valve which can be opened withoutrequiring that part of the casing be fast Casing valves which have been used in the past involve enlargements in the diameter of the casing string. That is to say, the outside diameter ofthe valve is greater than the outside diameter to the fact that'the inside diameter of the valve must be equal to that of the vcasing in order to permit introduction of the producing equipment intoy the. well and the design of these valves re t l quires that the outside diameter of the valve be casing together, thevmere size of the valve pre- 'vents-easy insertion into the well bore and; what" f is even more important,4 causes; channeling and Viniiriroper distribution ofthe cement introduced around the casing' which defeats the purpose oi -vthe cementing, and causes-eddying of cement and other fluids passing the valve. A'

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a casing valve which has the necessary tensile strength but which does not depart ap- ,preciably in outside diameter from an ordinary tion to provide a valve structure which does not present freely rotated parts to the-drill when the plug is being drilled out; f

This invention possesses many other advantages and has other objects which may be.' made more easily apparent from a consideration of. the embodiments thereof, shown in the drawings ac companying and forming part of the present specification. These formswill now be described infdetail, illustrating the general principles ofthe vv'iiiiventionzbut it is to be understood that this detailed description is not tobe taken in a limiting sense, since the scope of the invention is best l defined by the appended claims. I

Referring' nowto the drawings:

Figure 1 shows one form of the presentinven- A tion in use in cem'enting a well. the parts being in position to cause the cement to, flow to the space behind the casing; l y

Figure2 is an enlarged fragmentary section o! a device embodying the present invention with the parts in position to maintain the valve closed for lowering of the casing into thewell and for performance of various operations on the well prior to introduction of cement behind the casing through the valve Y l Figure 3 is a view similar to Figure 2 showing the valve in an open position f or the passage of cement therethrough, this position being identical 'i with that shown in Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a similar view showing parts' in nal une . casing string C located within a well bore. The

valve, generally designated V, comprises a pair of telescopically related members II and I2, the outermost member I I being threadedly connected to the length of casing I extending to the surface and the innermost member I2 being threadedly connected to the section of the casing I0' extending below the valve V. In order to provide means for discharging cement from the interior to the exterior of the casing through the valve, one of the telescoping members is provided with a plurality of discharge ports extending through its walls. In the present form these ports l3 are provided in the outermost member II. The end of the unported member I2 is formed at I4 with a sealing surface which is adapted to cooperate with a complementary sealing surface I5 on the interior of the outermost member II to form a fluid tight seal between the ports and the interior of the casing. It can be seen from mere inspection that relative telescopic movement between the valve members I I and I2 will bring the Vsealing surfaces I4 and I5 into engagement, to prevent passage of uid through the ports I3. The engagement of the surfaces I4 and I5 is the only sealing necessary to close the valve. For this reason, the seal need not be of yielding material and there are no sliding surfaces which need be made tight by packingor the like.

As hereinbefore mentioned, it is desirable to preserve the sealing surfaces from erosion by the abrasive uids discharged through the ports I3. This is accomplished by locating the sealing surfaces I 4 and I5 on the high pressure side of the ports I 3. The high velocity through the ports I3 thus does not affect the surfaces I4,and I5 inasmuch as the high velocity is not attained until the fluid enters the ports I 3.

The axial movement between members II and I2, which is necessary to operate the valve by bringing the sealing surfaces I4 and I5 together, can be most readily attained by the utilization of a threaded connection I 6 between the members II and I2. This threaded connection has been shown as consisting of an exterior' thread on the member I2 engaging a corresponding thread on the interior of member II. Such a connection is preferably made closely adjacent the sealing surfaces I4 and I5. Otherwise, the great weight of the casing abovethe valve might tend ito throw the sealing surfaces I4 and I5 out of line if the threads I6 were a little loose, which would render more difcult `the attainment of a tight seal. It can be seen that all that is required to close the ports I3 is rotation of the casing III with respect to the casing I Il', which can be readily done from the surface of the. ground. In order to prevent the two members II and I2 from coming apart when the device is being lowered into the well, a collar I I maybe secured to the member I I, as by means of threads 23 or the like, the collar preventing the member I2 from unscrewing from within the member I I.

The above described structure is'operative to close the valve after cement has been discharged through the ports. However, when it is desired to rst conduct cement to a point below the valve wall of the member I2.

or to the bottom of the casing, the valve mustbe closed while cement is passing through the casing to the point below the valve. It is also desirable that, after such cementing below the valvehas been completed, the valve be operative to open without the necessity of waiting until the cement introduced into the well below the valve is hardened. In the present instance the valve is kept closed during this cementing below the valve by means of a sleeve I9 which bridges the space between the sealing surfaces I4 and I5, as shown in Figure 2. This sleeve I9 is intended to be moved downwardly to thus open the ports I3 by a plug or the like driven down from the surface of the well ahead of the cement'l which is to be introduced through said ports I3 to the space around the casing. As shown in Figure 2, the sleeve I9 is held in a position to bridge the gap between the sealing surfaces I4 and I5 by means of a shear pin 20 passing through the sleeve I9 and into an opening drilled part way through the This pin is suilciently small that it may be sheared upon the application of a downward force to the sleeve I9. Projections 2I extend inwardly from the interior surface of the sleeve I9, so that a plug may engage these projections and upon its further downward travel shear the pin 20 causing downward movement of the sleeve I9. The sleeve will thus be moved from a position shown in Figure 2 to the position shown in Figure 3. The plug also serves the purpose of preventing cement or other fluids from passing down the interior of the casing to apoint below the valve Vl. After cementing has been completed, this plug may be removed by milling it up with a bit lowered from the surface on a drill pipe. As such milling operation requires that the plug and sleeve be held against rotation while the milling tool rotates, the lower end of the sleeve I9 is furnished with a noncontinuous end 22 providing shoulders 23. The interior of the member I2 is provided with a discontinuous shoulder 24 which is engaged by the bottom of the member I9 upon downward movement. The shoulder 23 abutting against the corresponding shoulder 25 serves to prevent rotation of the member I9 under the influence of the drill acting upon the plug.

The operation of this form of device should now be clear. The valve is secured in the length of the casing at the position desired, and lowered with the casing into the well with the parts of the valve in a position shown in Figure 2, that is, with the sealing surfaces I4 and I5 separated but bridged by the sleeve I9. After the casing has reached its desired position in the well, cementing operations below the valve V may be carried out in any conventional manner, whether these cementing operations be carried on through the bottom of the casing or through some valve intermediate the valve V and the bottom of the well. It then being desired to cement through the ports I3, a plug is driven down the casing from the surface, which plug, upon striking the member I9, drives it downwardly to the position shown in Figure 3. Cementing can then be commenced through the ports I3. After completion of this cementing operation, which usually takes sunicient time to permit the hardening of the cement placed below the valve, the uppermost portion I0 of the casing is rotated, the cement surrounding the lower portion III' of the casing effectively holding it against rotation. This rotation of the casing I0 closes the ports I3 by causins the sealing surfaces vI4 and l5 to come in contact with each other. The only further operation which must then be done on the casing is the removal of the plug within the member I9.

The above described series of' operations is made with the assumption that the sealing surfaces I 4 and I 5 will be preserved from abrasion, and furthermore that there will be no mishap preventing them from successfully forming' a ly to bring the members I4 and I5 into sealing engagement, it is still possible to seal the valve by rotating the upper section I Ill of thecasing relative to the lower section thereof. The upper end 28 of the sleeve will pass the shoulder Ii before members having a port through its wall for per- -mitting communication between the interior of said casing and the exterior thereof. a pair of coengageable sealing surfaces, one respectively on each of said members and operative upon relative axial movement between the members to separate to open and coengage to close the port, and an axially movable sleeve within said members in- -itially closing said port and movable to uncover the port by means actuated from the mouth of the well.

2. A valve structure for insertion in a casing string, comprising a pair of tubular members telescoping one within the other, one of said members being adapted to be secured to the casing extending above the valve, the other member ,being adapted to be secured to the casing extending below the valve, means connecting said memthe surfaces I4 and I5 are brought into contact.

Under these conditions the inner surface of the member Il and the outer surface of theh sleeve I9 will form a seal which prevents the passage of fluids between the outside and inside of the casing.

When a surface casing string is set. the regulatory bodies require that cement be pumped down around the bottom of the casing in suiiicient quantities to come to the surface of the ground in order to prevent leakage around the outside of the casing. Although the surface string is comparatively shallow, being less than fifteen hundred feet and usually .only a few hundred feet, channels can develop in the cement during its'passage from the bottom of the casing to the surface.. It is thus often desirable to install one of the described valves in the surface string, pumping a portion of the cement charge around the bottom of the casing in the usual manner and pumping the rest of the charge through the casing at a. point intermediate tlie surface of the ground and the bottom of the casing. When such a procedure is followed it is not bers for relative axial movement, one-of said members havinga port through its wall for permitting communication between the interior of said casing and the exterior thereof,a pair of coengageable sealingsurfaces, one respectively on each of said members and operative upon relative axial movement between the members to separate to open and coengage to close the port, an axially movable sleeve within saidmembers initially closing said port and movable to uncover the port by means actuated'from the mouth of the well, and

means releasably maintaining said members in port opening position.

3. A valve structure for Ainsertion in a casing string, comprising a pair of tubular members telescoping one within Itheother, one of said members being adapted tobe secured to the casing extending above the valve, the other member being adapted to be secured to the casing extending below the valve, means connecting said members for relative axial movement, one of said members having a port through its wall for permitting communication between the interior of said casing and the exterior thereof, a pair-of coengageable sealing surfaces, one respectively on each of said members and operative upon relative necessary to employ the sleeve I9. The device of Figure 5 can then .be utilized. 'Ihis device is identical in every respect to the device of Figures 1 to 4 and 6, except for the omission of the sleeve le. It will therefore not be necessary to describe it in full detail. The corresponding parts are indicated by primed numerals. This type of valve can. be operated by rotating the casing at the surface in one direction which opens the valve after the casing has been set. After cement has been introduced through the ports I3' to the space around the casing, the valve can be shut by rotation of the upper part of the casing, It will be understood that there are` only a few joints in the casing above the valve, and, as the bottom of the casing rests on the bottom of the hole, there is no danger of unscrewing the relatively few joints in the casing above the valve during the rotation of the upper part of the valve in a direction tending to loosen the couplings', if that operation is performed with caution.

vI claim:

l. A valve structure for insertion in acasing string,. comprising a pair of tubular members telescoping one withinthe other, one of said members being adapted to be secured to thecasing extending above the valve, the other member being adapted to be secured to the casing extending below the' valve, means connecting said members for relative axialy'movement, one of said axial movement between the members to separate to open and coengage to close the port, an axially movable sleeve within said members' initially releasably secured in an extended position with respect to one of said members. closing said port, and movable to a restricted position with respect to'said member to uncover the port by means actuated from the mouth of the well, and means on the other member` engageable with said sleeve when said sleeve is in extended, port closing position, whereby said sleeve maintains said members v positioned to separate said sealing surfaces to open said port.

4. A valve structure for insertion in a casing l string, comprising a pair of tubular members being adapted to be secured to the casing ex telescoping one within the other, one of said menibers being adapted to be secured to the casing extending above the valve, the other member tending'below the valve, means connecting said members for relative axial movement, one ofl said members having a port through its wall for-permitting communication between the interior of said casing and the exterior thereof, a pair of coengageable sealing surfaces,l one respectively on each of said members and operative upon relative axial movement in one direction between the members to separate to open the port, and upon relative axial movement in the opposite direction between the members to 4coengage to close the port, said surfaces being initiallyspaced apart t@ open the'port, an axially movable 'sleeve within said members initially closing vsaid port and movable to uncover the port by means actuated from 'bers for relative axial movement, one of said members having a portthrough its wall for 'permitting communication between the interior of ,said casing and the exterior thereof, a pair of coengageable sealing surfaces, one respectively on each of said members and operative upon relative axial movement in one direction between' the members to separate to open the port, and upon relative axial movement in the opposite direction between the members to coengage to close the port, means initially releasably maintaining said surfaces spaced apart, comprising a sleeve seated in one member and joined to the othermember by a frangible connection, said sleeve serving when maintaining said members apart to close the4 port and being movable to uncover the port and release said members for optional movement to close the port, by means operated from the mouth of the well.

6. A valve structure forinsertion in a casing string, comprising a' pair of tubular members telescoping one within the other, one of said members being adapted to be secured to the casing extending above the valve, the other member being adapted-'t0 be secured to the casing extending below the valve, means connecting said members for relative axial movement, one of said members having a port through its wall for permitting communication between' the interior of said casing and -the exterior thereof, a pair of ocoengageable sealing surfacf s, one respectively on -each ot'said members and operative upon relative axial movement between the members to separate to open and coeng'age to close the port, and

means forming an annular wall on one of said members between the surface on said member and the interior of said-members and extending part way to the other sealing surface when said members-are in port opening relation, for shielding said one surface from contact with fluid flowing from the casing through the port.

'7. A valve structure for insertion in a casing string, comprising a pair of tubular members telescoping one within the other, one of said members being adapted to be secured to the casing extending above the valve, the other member being adapted to be secured to the casing extending below the valve, means connecting said members for relative axial movement, one of said members having a port through'its wall for permitting communication between the interior of said casing and the exterior thereof, a pair of coengageable sealing surfaces, one respectively on each of said members and operative upon relative axial movement between the members to separate to open and coengage to close the port, said surfaces being initially spaced apart to open the port, an axially movable sleeve within said members and between said surfaces and the interior of the casing, initially closing said port and movable to uncover the port by means actuated from the mouth of the well, and means limiting movement of said sleeve in port uncovering direction whereby said sleeve extends beyond one of said sealing surfaces for shielding said surface from contact with fluid ilowing from the casing through the port.

8. A valve structure for insertion in a casingstring, comprising a pair of tubular members telescoping one within the other, one of said members being adapted to be secured to the casing extending above the valve, the other member being adapted to be secured to the casing extending 4below the valve, means connecting said members for relative axial movement, one of said members having a port through its wall for permitting communication between the interior of said casing and the exterior thereof,l a pair of coengageable sealing surfaces, one respectively on each of saidmembers and operative upon relative axial movement between the members to separate to open and coengage to close the port, said surfaces being initially spaced apart to open the port, an axially movable sleeve within said members initially closing said port and movable to uncover the port by means actuated from the mouth'of the well, and interengaging means respectively on said sleeve and one of said tubular members for maintaining said sleeve against rotation with respect to said member while in port 'opening position.

LANDES H. HAYWARD.

Patent No 2,579,079.

It is hereby certified of the above numbered paten ond column, 1i and that the said Letters in that the s'ame may conf Signed and sealed th (Seal) that error appears in the p follows :v Page 5,

ne 50, Claim v5,

Paten om to the record of the is 27th day of Nove CERTFICATE OF (CORRECTION,

June 26, 19LL5.

LANDES H. HAYNARD.

rinted specification SGC- t requiring 'correction as ieted" read retractedf;

for the Word "restr is correction theret should be read with th case in the Patent Office.

mbar, A. D. 19u15.

Leslie Frazer First Assistant Commissioner of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2435016 *Jun 5, 1944Jan 27, 1948Halliburton Oil Well CementingMultiple stage cementing
US2531943 *Feb 24, 1947Nov 28, 1950Baker Oil Tools IncCollar apparatus for cementing casings in wells
US2607422 *Dec 3, 1948Aug 19, 1952Standard Oil Dev CoMethod and apparatus for suspending pipe in boreholes
US2626778 *May 15, 1948Jan 27, 1953Lockett John RMethod and means for excluding water penetration into well bores
US2630999 *Feb 24, 1947Mar 10, 1953Baker Oil Tools IncWell casing cementing apparatus
US2644525 *Feb 24, 1947Jul 7, 1953Baker Oil Tools IncWell cementing apparatus
US2646125 *Nov 29, 1946Jul 21, 1953Parker Ind Products IncApparatus for multistage cementing of deep wells
US2905250 *Apr 2, 1956Sep 22, 1959Talbott William GWell pipe bypass valve
US2922479 *May 28, 1956Jan 26, 1960Macy Kinley MyronApparatus for controlling fluid circulation
US2958336 *Apr 23, 1958Nov 1, 1960Fmc CorpBack pressure valve
US2970649 *Aug 18, 1958Feb 7, 1961Brown Cicero CPressure sealed packer
US3045755 *Apr 7, 1958Jul 24, 1962Page Oil Tools IncValved production packer
US4479545 *Oct 27, 1982Oct 30, 1984Eley Fred NWell-cementing stage collar
US4520870 *Dec 27, 1983Jun 4, 1985Camco, IncorporatedWell flow control device
US7500516 *Oct 6, 2005Mar 10, 2009Vetco Gray Inc.System, method, and apparatus for accessing outlets in a two-stage diverter spool assembly
US8443897 *Jan 6, 2011May 21, 2013Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Subsea safety system having a protective frangible liner and method of operating same
US20070079990 *Oct 6, 2005Apr 12, 2007Vetco Gray Inc.System, method, and apparatus for accessing outlets in a two-stage diverter spool assembly
US20120175126 *Jul 12, 2012Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Subsea Safety System Having a Protective Frangible Liner and Method of Operating Same
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/154, 166/318, 251/344, 166/330
International ClassificationE21B34/12, E21B34/00, E21B33/13, E21B33/14
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/14, E21B34/12
European ClassificationE21B34/12, E21B33/14