Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2379798 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 3, 1945
Filing dateDec 26, 1942
Priority dateDec 26, 1942
Publication numberUS 2379798 A, US 2379798A, US-A-2379798, US2379798 A, US2379798A
InventorsGuth Edwin F
Original AssigneeGuth Edwin F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lighting fixture
US 2379798 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 3, 1945. E. F. GurH i 2,379,798

' LIGHTING FIXTURE Filed Dec. 26, 1942 i 2 Shee'f...'='.-Shee1;A 1

July 3, 1945.

E. F. -cau'rl-l LIGHTING FIXTURE Filed Dec. 26, 1942 'l 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented July 3, 1945 UNITED STATES PATENT] oFFlcs I1.1Gn'rzii;'ll'lx'l'limi'llim l I Edwin F. Goth. Florissant, Mo. i mutation December 2s, i942, serial No. man

'I'his invention relates to lighting fixtures and more particularly to lighting fixtures for tubular fluorescent lamps.

Among the objects of this invention arethe provision of an improved lighting ilxture of the class referred to which is relatively sturdy; the provision of a lighting fixture which may be easily vmade and quickly installed, which supports the aching. (ci. 24o-fusi' L-shapes through the struck-out bridge portions, the other leg of each L-shape resting onthe saddle-or bridge I5. Thus the electrical lamp sockets and at the same time provides proillustrated several of various possible embodi.

ments of the invention, y

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a lighting fixture' of the present invention;

Fig. 2 is an end view ofxa lighting fixture with one end plate carryingV the sockets, and lamps removed;

Fig. 3 is a, plan view of an end plate;

Fig. 4 is a sectionV taken along line I-I of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is an end view of another embodiment of the invention from which the end plate has likewise been removed; I

Fig. 6 is a section taken along line 6 6 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 'I is a planof the end plate of the Fig. 5 and Fig. 6 embodiment;

Fig. 8 is a plan of an alternative form of end plate; and,4

Fig. 9 isl a plan of still another form of an end plate.

Similar numbers indicate corresponding parts throughout the various views of the drawings.

Referring now to Fig. 1, a light iixture is illustrated having a reflector 3, lamp ballast 5, starters 1, endplates 9, a supporting channel II and lamps I3. End plates 9 have partially relieved or struck-out portions of two different types, I5 and I1. The relieved bridge-shaped portions I5, when bent away from end plates 9, provide saddle-shaped or bridge-shaped supports for the lgenerally L-shaped lamp sockets I9. Ears I1, when pushed out of the plane of end plates 9,

provide attaching portions for attaching the end plates 9 to channel support Il. Suitable opensocket proper extends through an opening formed when the' saddle I5 is pushed out vertically in relation to the en d plates 9. This is the pre;

. tional construction are preferably made of in- Vso - this way reflector 3 rests on channel I l, as shown.

ings 2| and 23 are provided in the saddle portions I5 and ear portions I 1 respectively. Bolts 25 hold the end plate in position on channel Il.

Fig. 4 illustrates in dotted lines the saddle or bridge-shaped portions I5 and ears I 1 bent out into position for attachment of the end plates 9 to the channel II and for attaching the sockets I9 in position to receive lamps I3. In Fig. 2 the sockets I9 are shown asl having one leg of their Suitable-supporting means such as chain 3|, may be used to suspend the ilxture from the ceiling.

'I'he end plates 9 not only provide, through saddle members I 5, support for the lamp .sockets I9, but also act as socket protectors. These plates extend behind the lamp-holding sockets to protcct them against abuse during transportation, installation and at reflector cleaning time. A broken socket means a rewiring operation. f These socket-supporting end plates act as buffers against such abuse. They also assure accurate socket positioning in service.

The spacing of the saddle portions I 5, as shown -in Figs. 1 and 3, is preferred, since it facilitates wiring the light fixture. The sockets I9 are easily installed or removed without dismantling the remainder of the ilxture.

One of the important advantages of the present fixture is that it may be almostcompletely assembled in lthe plant before shipping. This avoids diillculties otherwise inherentin the installation of such structures with unskilled labor. In the present structure the channel support II, end plates 9, starters 1, ballast 5, andsockets i9 may all be assembled, and the ilxture wired in the manufacturing plant. The assembled iixture may then be shipped as one unit, the reflector shipped separately, and the installation of the structure accomplished merely by suspending the nxture, placing the reflector 3 in position, and attaching the wiring leads to a source of power.

In Figs. 5-7 is illustrated another embodiment oi the invention. Here the supporting channel II not only supports but encloses the lamp ballast l. In this instance, the end plates il are oonstructed so as to cover the ends not only of the lamp sockets-but the ends oi' the channel I3 as well. Knock-out plugs 31 and 39 are preferably provided in end plates 35 for use in wiring, and in'attaching together a plurality of iix'ture units. It will be noted that in this embodiment, the saddles IB have been located on a diagonal line, and since the structure is a two-light unit, only two of these saddles have been Provided.

Fig. 8 illustrates the way in which a third saddle I can be added to the Fig. 5-'7 embodiment. In this way, a third tubular light may be added to a two-light fixture.

The saddle-shaped portion should be of adequate size to support the sockets. Fig. 9 illustrates an end plate i'or a unit having larger tubular lights. Ii it be assumed that the saddles I 5 are oi' adequate size to support a socket for a iO-watt fluorescent lamp, the saddles 4I in Fig. 9 may be regarded as of suilicient size to support a 10D-watt tubular lamp socket,

In lieu of the attaching ears I1, the end plates may merely be riveted onto the supporting channel. It will be noted that th'is is what is done in the Fig. 5-7 illustrative embodiment. Bent-over portions 43 may be utilized for this attachment.

In view of theabove, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

As many changes could be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope oi the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above .description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and mitV in a limiting sense.A

1. A lighting xture for tubular iluorescent lights comprising a 'supporting channel, end plates attached to said supporting channel, lamp sockets for supporting said tubular uorescent lamps, a reilector supported by but not attached to said supporting channel. and supports for said lamp sockets, the plane of one of said supports being positioned at an angle with respect to the plane oi another oi' said supports, said supports having been relieved from said end plates.

2. A lighting fixture for tubular uorescen lamps comprising a supporting channel, end plates attached to said supporting channel, lamp sockets assegna fox-.supporting said tubular nuorescent lamps. Supports for said lamp sockets, said supports having been relieved from said end plates. a separate reilector supported by said supporting channel but not vphysically attached thereto, and supporting means for attaching the supporting channel to a 3. A lighting xture for tubular fluorescent lamps comprising a supporting channel, end plates attached to said supporting channel, lamp sockets for supporting said tubular fluorescent lamps, supports for said lamp sockets, said supports having been relieved from said end plates. a separate reilector supported by said supporting channel but not physically attach'ed thereto, and supporting means for attaching the supporting channel to a ceiling, the plane oi' one of said lamp socket supports being positioned at an angle with respect to the plane of another of said socket supports, and partially relieved attaching members relieved from said end plates for attaching said end plates 'to said channel.

5. .A lighting :Bxture for tubular fluorescent lamps comprising a supporting channel, end

plates attached to said supporting channel, lamp sockets for supporting said tubular fluorescent lamps, three supports for said lamp sockets at each end of said supporting channel, said supports having been relieved from said end plates, a separate reflector supported by said supporting channel but not physically attached thereto, and supporting means for attaching the supporting channel to a ceiling, the plane oi' one of said lamp socket supports at each end of said supporting channel being positioned at an angle with respect to the planes oi the other lamp socket supports at each end.

' EDWIN F. GUTE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2534182 *Dec 2, 1946Dec 12, 1950Max J MarksElectric fixture for tubular fluorescent lamps
US2724047 *Sep 4, 1952Nov 15, 1955Garden City Plating & Mfg CoFluorescent light fixture
US2907872 *Mar 17, 1953Oct 6, 1959Wilson WesleyFluorescent lighting fixture
US3333644 *Jul 22, 1964Aug 1, 1967Lavergne ServilleTuber digger
US7674005 *Apr 5, 2005Mar 9, 2010Focal Point, LlcRecessed sealed lighting fixture
US20060023450 *Apr 5, 2005Feb 2, 2006Focal Point, LlcRecessed sealed lighting fixture
USD756016Feb 28, 2014May 10, 2016Ip Holdings, LlcHorticulture grow light housing
USD757324 *Apr 14, 2014May 24, 2016Cree, Inc.Linear shelf light fixture with reflectors
USD757325Jul 11, 2014May 24, 2016Ip Holdings, LlcLight fixture
USD757326Jul 11, 2014May 24, 2016Ip Holdings, LlcFluorescent light fixture
USD757327Dec 12, 2014May 24, 2016Ip Holdings, LlcFluorescent light fixture
USD770671Sep 3, 2015Nov 1, 2016Ip Holdings, LlcHorticulture grow light
USD785846Apr 18, 2016May 2, 2017Ip Holdings, LlcFluorescent light fixture
USD786491Sep 26, 2016May 9, 2017Ip Holdings, LlcHorticulture grow light
USD791999Mar 25, 2016Jul 11, 2017Ip Holdings, LlcHorticulture grow light housing
DE19641343A1 *Oct 8, 1996Apr 9, 1998Thorn Licht GmbhHead-piece for high-bay strip-lighting fluorescent lighting
EP2149747A1 *Jul 30, 2009Feb 3, 2010Bticino S.P.A.Mounting device for lamp holders
WO2000039502A1 *Dec 22, 1999Jul 6, 2000Christiaan TaljaardFluorescent light support
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/225, D26/76, 248/248
International ClassificationF21V19/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V19/008
European ClassificationF21V19/00F1