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Publication numberUS2380022 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 10, 1945
Filing dateJun 23, 1941
Priority dateJun 23, 1941
Publication numberUS 2380022 A, US 2380022A, US-A-2380022, US2380022 A, US2380022A
InventorsBurt Clarence E
Original AssigneeBaker Oil Tools Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flow control apparatus
US 2380022 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 1o, 1945. c. Bum I 2,380,022

v FLOW CONTROL APPARATUS Filed June 23, 1941 2 SheeIcs-Sheet l wie .A TTOQNEY.

. July l0, 1945. i c. E. BUR-T 2,380,022

l FLOW CONTROL APPARATUS CLARE/vas E: .5u/27; INVENTQR @EMQM A Trae/Vey.

in the collar body to prevent passage of fluids therethrough, or to be positioned clear of these ports to permit fluid ilow between the interior and exterior of the conduit string. Resistance to inadvertent movement of the sleeve valve I0 and its normal retention in any given position vis provided for and assured by friction leaf spring elements 23 received within an external circumferential recess 24 in the sleeve. One end of veach element 23 is attached to the sleeve by a rivet or screw 25,.and its bowed portion engages the inner surface of the body to create resistance to movement of the sleeve. To guard against undue inadvertent sleeve movement,` stop rings 26, 21

are provided on oppositesides of the lateral ports to positively limit the extent of travel of the sleeve.

As shown in Figures l, 2 and 3, the stops 26, 21 are arranged so as to permit movement of the sleeve valve I0 to open position in a; downwardv direction, and to .closed position in an upward direction. This movement of the sleeve is obtained by a mechanism B embodying a mandrel body 28 adapted for attachment to a tubular string 29 or' a` wire line for lowering into position with respect to the valve. The mechanism consists of a plurality of circumferentially spaced longitudinally extending slots 39 formed by pairs of spaced, parallel plates 3| extending from and welded or otherwise secured to the body 28. A latch 32 is received, within each slot, with one end pivotally mounted on a hinge pin 33 secured to the guide plates 3|. Each latch is moved laterally on its pivot 33 in an outward direction by a spring 34 bearing against the bottom of the slot 30 and suitably secured to the free end of the latch, the extent of this movement being'limited by engagement of the latch 32 with a stop 35 fixed to the guide members 3| and extending across the slot or groove 30. It is apparent that the latch 32- may be forced inwardly against the action of the leaf spring 34 whenever required.

Each latch 32 is equipped with a dog or lug 36 engageable with an end 31 or 38 of the valve sleeve I0 in order to couple the shifting mechanism B to the sleeve for movement therewith in a particular direct-ion. Each latch also carries a cam` member 39 adapted to engage a cam actuating shoulder 2| or 22 formed on the collar body for the purpose of moving the latch inwardly against the action of lits spring 33, to' free its dog or lug 36 from engagement with the valve sleeve.

As illustrated in Figure 1, the valve sleeve l0 is in`closed position across the lateral ports and the dog l36 has just engaged the upper end 31 of the sleeve. Downward movement of the mandrel 29 will shift the sleeve to the open position disclosed in Figure 3. But in moving towards this position, the inclined cam 39 at the lower end of the latch will .engage the cam actuating shoulder 2|, and due to the inward and downward inclination of this cam, the latch 32 will be forced inwardly against the force of the spring 34 upon continued downward movement of the mandrel to move the clutching dog orlug 36 out of engagement with the sleeve valve. Figure 3, the latch is pictured as on the verge of becoming completely disconnected or uncoupled from the valve sleeve |0, which will permit longitudinal downward movement of the shifting mechanism B without any further effect upon the sleeve; As was pointed out above, the fnction springs 23 prevent inadvertent movement of the sleeve valve from the position in whichit has been moved positively by the latch ldog 36', but as a precautionary measure, the lower stop ring 21 may be provided to definitely limit the extent of this downward movement. In the event that it is desired to move the valve sleeve ||J to closed position over its ports the shifting mechanism B may include a second set of latches 32a. As disclosed in the drawings, these are similar to the first-mentioned -set in all structural details, the only difference residing in their facing in an opposite direction; so that upon upward movement of the mandrel 28 (see Figure 2), their upwardly facing clutch dogs or lugs 36a will engage the lower end 38 of the sleeve Il) to carry it upwardly into position across the valve causes engagement of the inwardly and upwardly inclined cam surfaces 39a on'the lower latches 32a with the cam actuating shoulder 22 formed on the body l5 at the upper end ofthe recess 20, to force the latches inwardly against theaction of their leaf springs 34a, and in so doing, move the clutching dogs 36a,inwardly out of engagement with the-sleeve, effecting an automatic freeing of the shifting mechanism'B from the sleeve il) to allowits continued and `unrestrained movement in an upward direction. Although the friction springs 23 ordinarily hold the sleeve valvev in the position to which it ha's been shifted by, the mandrel, its inadvertent movement in an upward direction is positively limited by the upper stop ring 26. i

It is to be noted that the trailing'or rear faces 30, 4| of the clutching dog and cam 4on each latch are inclined inwardly in the direction of the latch hinges -33 to produce an inward forcing of the latches upon engagement of 'these trailing faces with the sleeve valve ||J or the cam actuating shoulders 2| or 22. This action isthe same as occurs upon engagement of the leading cam face 39 or 39a with the sleeve or shoulder upon movement of one of the sets of latches in a forward or sleeve shifting direction. As a result, the sleeve I0 will not be moved until engaged by the leading faces of the dogs 36, 36a. To take an actual occurrence, upon moving downwardly past the sleeve valve I0, the lower set of latches 5 32a merely ride over the inner surface of theI sleeve due to the inclination of their rear dog and cam faces 40, 4|. Similarly, the inclined leading cam -faces 39 on the upper latches' 32 have no effect upon the sleeve, merely engaging its upper end 31 to be forced inwardly thereby for riding along the inner surface of the sleeve.

The dog 36 and' cam 39 of each latch 32 are l separated by a greater distance than the length of the valve sleeve l0 to permit reception of the sleeve therebetween after the cam has completed passage along its inner surface. The spring. can therefore force the dog 36 outwardly into position for engaging the end 31 of the sleeve. As

the latches 32 over the sleeve valve I 0 vwithout effecting its movement. A continuation of this upward movement causes complete riding of the lower latch c ams 39a over the sleeve and clutching engagement yof the lower latch dogs 36a with the bottom end 38 of the sleeve tocause longitudinal sliding of the latter back to closed position across the lateral ports H. has occurred, further upward movement of the mandrel 28 engages the cams 39a with the cam actuating shoulder 22 to effect release of the dogs 36a from the sleeve, allowing free movement of the shifting mechanism B within the conduit, and its withdrawal to the surface of the bore, if desired.

A second form of shifting mechanism is disclosed in ,Figure 5, in which the general relation- After this action Y ship of members is the same as heretofore menv tioned, but in which a different specic embodiment of latches is employed. Each latch device consists of a link 42 having one end mounted on a hinge pin 43, and its other end articulated to a latch lever 44 by means of a pin 45 fixed to the link and forming a lost motion connection with a slot @t provided in the free end of the latch lever. The latch lever llt is mounted on a hinge pin il secured between the guide plates 3l, the latch lever and link both being forced outwardly by the bowed springs lit, fill secured thereto and bearing against the bottom of the slot 3d. The latch lever lill has a clutch dog or lug 58 extending outwardly from its free end for engagement with the sleeve valve lll. The link i2 is provided with a cam 5l adapted to engage the cam actuating shoulder 22a on the collar body i541 for the purpose of moving the clutch dog 5t inwardly A out of engagement with th'e valve sleeve i@ against theactions of the bowed springs lit, flu. The extent of outward movement of the latch lever dit and its cooperable linkl [i2 is limited by a stop 35a extending across the guide plate slot 3@ and engageable with the outer 'surface of the link. As in the other form of the invention, the distance between th'e cam 5|! and the clutch dog or lug 5D is greater than the lengthI of the sleeve to permit reception of the latter therebetween and engagement of the dog 58 with the end of the sleeve it.

The trailing faces 52, 53 of the dog 5d and cam iii are suitably inclined (as in the other form of the invention) .so that upon their engagement with the end 3l of the sleeve they will merely force th'e latch" lever itil and link l2 inwardly against the eiorts of the bowed springs lid, titl, without producing movement of the sleeve. y Referring to Figure 5, the sleeve valve id is disthe guide link 42 inwardly against the action of its spring 49, and through the pin and slot connection 45, 46'correspondingly move the latch lever M and its projecting dog 50 inwardly out of contact with the end 38 of the sleeve, automatically freeing the mechanism from the sleeve and permitting its withdrawal to the surface of'the bore or to a new location within the conduit string. A

While only one set of latches has been disclosed in Figure 5, it is to be understood that the sleeve valve I Il can also be moved in the opposite direction through the provision of an oppositely facing second set of latches, as in the other form of invention. The cam actuating shoulder 2| a below the ports will efect release of this second set of latches, while stops 26a, 21a can be provided on opposite sides of the ports to positively limit the extent of travel of the valvesleeve.

Although the form of invention shown in Figures 1 to 4, inclusive, involves the movement of the' valve ysleeve Ill to open position upon downward movement of the mandrel, it is apparent that a reverse operation can occur merely by locating thelateral ports l I closer to the lower 'stop ring 2l (as in Figure 5). Downward movement of the shifting mechanism B would th'ereby slide Y the sleeve l ll to a closed position, whereas upward titl closed as positioned across the lateral ports il.

il desired, suitable piston rings 5d or other seals fmay be provided in ring grooves d5 in the sleeve to prevent iiuid leakage around the sleeve and through the porte. i these seals dit are employed (they can be of the split metallic type or be made of rubber or other non-metallic packing material), they can supply sucient frictional eiort ing with the mechanism to a position in which the e ports l l are open to the passage of uids.

Cof.-` tinuation of th'is upward movement engages the inclined cam surfaces 5i with the cam actuating shoulder 22a. provided on the collar body, to force movement would effect its opening.

The"l upper and lower sets of latches 332, 32a can also be interchanged. That is, the lower set 32a would face in the same direction as il1ustrated,but be positioned above the upper set 32. If the latches were arranged in this manner, it would be possible toshift the sleeve valve l0 in both longitudinal directions, as described, and in addition,

Iafter the valve h'as been returned to its upper position, it could be moved again to its lower position by lowering the mechanism once more, without, however, moving the upper set of latches 32d downwardly past the sleeve. With this arrangement of the latch sets, and with the lateral ports ll positioned so that downward movement of the sleeve closes the ports (as in Figure 5), the ports can be closed upon downward movement of the mandrelvw opened upon upward movement of the mandrel, and closed again upon downward movement of the mandrel, after which the mandrel can be elevated, leaving the sleeve in closed position.

The shifting mechanism B is employable for controlling either a single valve in a conduit string or a plurality of valves located therein at longitudinally sepa-rated points. Due tothe fact that the latches 32, 32a or M engage the sleeve I0 to move `it in a given direction and are then automatically released upon progressing in this same direction, the mechanism may continue this direction of movement within the conduit string free from restraint or stoppage. For example, after shifting the valve to open position, as described` in connection with Figure 1, the mechanism becomes released from the sleeve and can be lowered for operation upon a second valve sleeve positioned at some point in the tubing below the one disclosed, acting in the same manner to move this valve toa desired position. After 4 'moving this second valve sleeve, the mechanism is released for continuation of its movement in the same direction to shift any `number of valve meml bers th'at might -be provided in the conduit'string.

Upon the return trip, all of these'valve members would be shifted in the opposite direction.

The apparatus described has many uses in well bores, including the control of oil flow from producing zones into production tubing, and the cementing of casing or liner strings.v In connection with the single stage, multiple stage, or

series cementing of the latter strings, ports Il may be opened at any selected station through which cement slurry is to be deposited behind the casing or liner. In Figures 1 and 2, the operative mechanismis disclosed as forming part of a perforation cementer, its body 2li forming part' of the spacer tubing between the opposed swab cups 56, 5l of this type of tool, which can be 'I of any known design. This modified perforation vcementer is lowered on a tubing string 29 to the desired position in the well bore, and cement ejected from the tool outlets 58 between the opposed cups for passage through the lateral ports II into the annular space between the casing l or liner and the wall of the well bore.

As disclosed in Figure 1, upon lowering of the control mandrel 28, the upper set of latches 32 shifts the sleeve lll to open the ports ll and allow cement slurry to be forced therethrough,

' after which elevation of the tubing string 2% with the latches moves all of the valve sleeves to open position upon moving downwardly through the casing. After arriving at the lowermost cementing station, the cement slurry is deposited through the open ports at this particular location, after which elevation of the tubing string and mandrel would move the valve sleeve to closed position. The mandrel is then elevated and positioned with the opposed swab cups 56, 51 on opposite sides of the next higher cementing station, and cement slurry pumped through the open ports at this particular point. The elevation of themandrel then causes the lower set of latches 32a to move the valve sleeve to closed position. It isV apparent that this action can occur in an upward sequence at as many stations as are provided in the casing or liner string, the cement being depositedunder pressure if necessary through each station and the particular valve then closed to prevent its return flow into the casing.

When employed in a casing or liner string, it is preferred that the inside diameter of the string vor to allow its complete withdrawal from the well bore. v

. I claim:

1. An apparatus including a ported conduit adapted to be positioned-in a well bore, valve means for controlling the flow. of fluids throughl thel port of said conduit, a device comprising .Y

instrumentalities movable laterally of said conduit to engage said valve means for shifting it with respect to said port upon movement of said device in one direction within said conduit, and means fixed with respect to said conduit and engageable with said instrumentalities upon continuation of the movement of said device in said one direction for moving said instrumentalities laterally of said conduit to disengage said instrumentalities from said valve means.

2. An apparatus including a ported conduit adapted to be positioned in a well bore, valve means for controlling the ow of fluids through the port of said conduit, a device comprising in-4 strumentalities movable laterally of said conduit to engage said valve means for shifting it with respect to said port upon movement of said device in one direction within said conduit, means engageable with said instrumentalities upon continuation of the movement ofl said device in said one direction for moving said instrumentalitiessleeve valve to shift it with respect to said port i upon movement of said device in one direction within said conduit, and means fixed with respect to said conduit and engageable with said device for disengaging it from said sleeve valve upon continuation of its movement in said one direction.

4. An apparatus including a ported conduit adapted to be positioned in a well bore, valve means for controlling the flow of fluid through the port of said conduit, a device engageable with be unrestricted to enable use of the perforation cementer and similar tools which have a sliding t with the wall of the casing. The control mechanism and sleeve valve apparatus lend themselves readily to the achieving of this objective,

since the sleeve valve I0 can have an inside diameter no less than that of the casing sections I2, I3 by being placed in the recessed portion 20 of the collar body I5, the ends of this recess provide the actuating abutments 2l, 22 for the latch A or link cams 39, 39a, 5I.

Movement of the has been effected, to permit movement of the con- I trol mechanism withoutvrestraint to a new location for the performance of another operation,

said valve means to shift it with respect to said p'ort upon movement of said device in one direction within said conduit, said device comprising means engageable with means on said convice from said sleeve valve upon continuation of its movement in said one direction.

6. An apparatus including a ported conduit adapted to be positioned in a well bore, a sleeve valve within said conduit for controlling the ow of fluids through the port'of said conduit, a

`device adapted to be coupled to said sleeve'valve for shifting it with respect to said port upon longitudinal movement of said device in one Vdirection within said conduit, and means fixed with,

respect to said conduit and engageable with said device upon continuation of its movement in said one direction for uncoupling it from said sleeve valve.

7. An apparatus including a ported conduitv adapted to be positioned in a well bore, valve .means within said conduit for controlling the ilow of uids through the port of said conduit, a device engageable with said valve means for shifting it with respect to said port upon longitudinal movement of said device inone direction Within said conduit, and means fixed with respect to said conduit and engageable with said device upon continuation of its movement in said one' direction to positively release it from said valve means.

8. An apparatus including a ported conduit adapted to be positioned in a well bore, a sleeve valve within said conduit for controlling the flow of iluids through the port of said conduit, a device engageable with' said sleeve valve for positively sliding it within said conduit to both closed and open positions with respect to said port, and means on said device and conduit engageable with one another for releasing said device from engagement with said sleeve valve.

9. An apparatus including a ported conduit adapted to be positioned in a well bore, a sleeve valve within said conduit for controlling the ilow of fluids through its port, a device movable longitudinally through said conduit in one direction for engaging and shifting said valve from closed to open position, said device being movable longitudinally through said conduit in the other direction for engaging and shifting said sleeve valve' from open to closed positionsaid device comprising means engageable with means on said conduit for releasing said device from said sleeve valve in response to longitudinal movement of said device in said conduit.

10. An apparatus including a ported conduit adapted to be positioned in a Well bore, a sleeve valve within said conduit for controlling the flow i of uids through `its port, a device engageable with said sleeve v-alve to shift it relatively to said port, cam means on said device, and actuating means on said conduit engageable with said cam means for disengaging said device from said sleeve valve. i

l1. An apparatus including a ported conduit adapted to be positioned in a Well bore, a sleeve valve within said conduit for controlling the now of fluids through its port, latching means engageable with said sleeve valve to shift it relatively to said port, said latching means comprising cam instrumentalities, and actuating means fixed with respect to said conduit and engageable with said cam instrumentalities for disengaging said latching means from said sleeve valve.

l2. An apparatus including a 4ported conduit adapted to be positioned in a well bore, valve means for controlling the now of fluids through tively to said port. said v,device comprising a latch and cam means connected therewith, said latch being engageable with said valve means to shift the same, and actuating means on said conduit engageable with said cam means upon movement of said device`within said conduit `for disengaging said latch from said valve means after said latchy has shifted'said valve means.

14. An apparatus including a ported conduit adapted to be positioned in a well bore, a sleeve valve within said conduit for controlling the ow of fluids through its port, a vdevice movable through said conduit for shifting said sleeve valve relatively to said port, said device comprising a latch adapted to be coupled to said sleevevalve upon longitudinal movement of said device in one vdirection within said conduit, actuating means on said conduit, and camv means connected yto said latch and en gageable with said actuating means for eiecting release of said latch from said sleeve valve in response to a continuation of movement of said device in said one direction.

l5. An apparatus including a ported tubular inember adapted to form part of a conduit positioned in a well bore, a sleeve valve received within a circumferential recess in said tubular member for controlling the iiow of fluids through its port, a device movable through said tubular member for shifting said sleeve valve Within said recess, said device comprising a latch adapted to be coupledv to said sleeve valve upon longitudinal said conduit, and cam means connected to said the port of said conduit, latching means movable l latch and engageable with a portion of said tubular member which defines an end of said recess for releasing said latch :from said sleeve valve in response to a continuation of movement or said device in said one direction.

16. An apparatus including a ported conduit adapted to be positioned in a well here, a sleeve valve within said conduit for controllingthe new of fluids through its port, a device movable through said conduit for shifting said sleeve valve to open and closed positions with respect to said port, said device comprising supporting means, a latch on said supporting meansadapted to be coupled to said sleeve valve for moving it longitudinally in one direction within said conduit, an oppositely directed latch on said supporting means adapted to loe coupled to said sleeve valve for moving it in the opposite direction within said conduit, actuating mean.s 'on said conduit, and cam means connected to each oi said latches and engageable with said actuating means for automatically releasing one of said latches from said 17. An apparatus including a ported tubular member adapted to form part of a conduit positioned in a well bore, valve means Within said member for controlling the iiovv of fluids through its port, actuating means on said tubular member, a device movable through said tubular member for shifting said valve means with respect to said port, said device comprising a latch pivoted on said body and adapted to be coupled to said valve means, and a cam on said latch engageable with said actuating means Vfor uncoupling s aid latch from said valve means.

18. An apparatus including a ported tubular member adapted to form part of a conduit positioned in a well bore, valve means within said body, a

member for controlling the flow of fluids through its port, actuating means on said tubular member, a device movable through said tubular member for shifting said valve means with respect to said port, said device comprising a body, a latch pivoted on said body and adapted to be coupled to said valve means, a link pivoted on said body and connected to said latch, and a cam on said link engageable with said actuating means for uncoupling said latch from said valve means.

19. An apparatus including a ported tubular member adapted to form part of a conduit posi: tioned in a well bore, a sleeve valve received within a circumferential recess in said tubular member for controlling the ow of iiuids through its port, a device movable Within said tubular member for shifting said sleeve valve longitudinally within said recess, said device comprising a body,

gagey said sleeve valve, and a cam on said latch engageable with a portion of said tubular member which defines an end of said recess for uncoupling said latch from said sleeve valve.

20. An apparatus including a ported tubular member adapted to form part of, a. conduit positioned in a well bore, a sleeve valve received withmember which defines an end of said recess for a latch pivoted on said body. and adapted to en uncoupling said latch from said sleeve Valve.

v CLARENCE E. BURT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2593520 *Oct 11, 1945Apr 22, 1952Baker Oil Tools IncWell cementing apparatus
US2616503 *Sep 30, 1948Nov 4, 1952Armentrout Arthur LCirculation control for wells and actuator therefor
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US8616293 *Nov 24, 2009Dec 31, 2013Michael C. RobertsonTool positioning and latching system
US20110120731 *May 26, 2011Robertson Intellectual Properties, LLCTool Positioning and Latching System
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/214, 166/237, 166/289, 166/332.1, 251/318, 251/186, 137/291, 251/341
International ClassificationE21B33/13, E21B34/00, E21B34/14, E21B33/14
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/146, E21B34/14
European ClassificationE21B34/14, E21B33/14C