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Publication numberUS2380105 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 10, 1945
Filing dateMar 11, 1944
Priority dateMar 11, 1944
Publication numberUS 2380105 A, US 2380105A, US-A-2380105, US2380105 A, US2380105A
InventorsOswald Gerrard
Original AssigneeOswald Gerrard
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Airplane landing and retarding apparatus
US 2380105 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 10, 1945. o. GERRARD v AIRPLANE LANDING AND RETARDING APPARATUS Filed March 11, 1944 4 Sheets-S het 1 a w/jezfm/ By M58]:

July 10, 1945. o. GERRARD 2,330,105

v AIRPLANE LANDING AND RETARDING APPARATUS I Filed March 11, 1944 4 SheetsSheet 2 Inventor 3' 511/67/0 ge/ m 12/ July 10, 1945. o. GERRARD 2,380,105

AIRPLANE LANDING AND RETARDING APPARATUS Fileq March 11, 1944 4 Sheets-Shee't 4 Inventor adge j Paiented lul lo, 1945 AIRPLANE LANDING AND RETARDING APPARATUS Oswald Gerrard, Houston, Tex.

Application March 11, 1944, Serial No. 526,026

1 Claim.

The present invention relatesto new and useful improvements in means for landing and arresting or retarding'airplanesand has for one of its importantobjects to provide, in a manner as hereinafter set forth, an apparatus of this character which is adapted to be installed on land, roof tops and sea dromes, various types of vessels, et cetera.

Another very important object of the invention is to provide an apparatus of the aforementioned character comprising a, novel construction, combination and arrangement for eliminating the usual long run of an airplane after contact is made, thus permitting safe landings to be accomplished in comparatively short or restricted areas.

Still another important object of the invention is to provide a landing and retarding apparatus of the character set forth comprising a carriage for receiving an airplane and traveling therewith, said carriage being actuated by the momentum of the airplane landing thereon.

A further important object of the invention is to provide an apparatus of the aforementioned character which embodies unique braking means for the carriage, said braking means being operable by the airplane, or station controlled, electric, hydraulic, air, radar, or mechanical brakes.

Other objects of the invention are to provide an airplane landing and retarding apparatus which will be comparatively simple in construction, strong, durable, highly efilcient and reliable in use, and which may be manufactured and installed at low cost.

All of the foregoing, and still further objects and. advantages of the invention, will become apparent from a study of the following specification, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein like characters of reference designate corresponding parts throughout the several views, and wherein:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of an airplane landing and retarding apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 2 is a bottom plan view of the carriage.

Figure 3 is a view in vertical longitudinal section through an intermediate portion of-the apparatus.

Figures 4 and 5 are cross sectional views, taken substantially on the lines 4-4 and 55, respectively, of Figure 3.

Figure 6 is a detail view in top plan of the longitudinally slidable brake-operating bar. I

Figure 7 is a detail view in elevation of the airplane retarding and brake-applying bale.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, it will be seen that the embodiment of the apparatus which has been illustrated comprises what may be considered an elongated pit which is designated generally by reference character I. The pit I includes a bottom 2 from which longitudinal side walls 3 of substantially T-shaped cross section rise. Projecting inwardly from the side walls 3 are flanges constituting rails 4 thepurpose of which will be presently set forth.

The pit I is installed beneath an elongated deck 5 of suitable length, width and material. The deck 5 has formed therein longitudinal slots 6. The slots 6 communicate with the pit I and are immediately adjacent the side walls 3 thereof, which side walls said slots parallel.

A carriage I is operable in the pit I. The carriage 1, in the embodiment shown, includes spaced, parallel side beams 8 with cross members 9 extending therebetween. Journaled transversely in the side beams 9 are rollers I0 the end portions of which travel on the rails 4. As illustrated to advantage in Figure 5 of the drawings, the beams 8 comprise lateral flanges or tongues II which project beneath the rails 4. Thus, the carriage 'I is positivelyv prevented from being lifted in the pit I. Comparatively short rollers I2 beneath the beams 8 are adapted to travel on the bottom 2 of the pit I.

Rising from the carriage I are brackets I3 which travel in the slots 6. A transversely ribbed or corrugated platform I 4 is mounted on the brackets I3 for operation above the deck 5. The platform I4 has formed in its rear end portion longitudinal slots I5 (see Fig. 2*). Extending across the forward end portion of the platform I4 is a crash net or guard I6.

Mounted for longitudinal sliding movement in the rear portion of the carriage I, between the beams 8, is a rack bar II. Arcuate links I8 connect the rack bar I! to the inner end portions of a pair of cam levers I9 which are pivotally mounted at 20 for operation beneath the beams 8. The cams on the outer ends of levers I9 are engaged with resilient shoes 2| mounted longitudinally on the beams 8 and which are frictionally engageable with the opposed walls 3 of the pit I beneath the rails 4.

A transverse shaft 22 is journaled on the rear end of the carriage I; Fixed on the shaft 22 is an elongated gear 23 which is engaged with the rack bar I1. Arms 24 on the end portions of the shaft 22 are operable in the slots .I5 in the platform I4. Mounted for swinging movement on the arms 24, above the platform I4, is a bale 25 for engagement by the usual hook beneath an airplane which is equipped to make a landing in a short or restricted space.

It is thought that the operation of the apparatus will be readily apparent from a consideration of the foregoing. Briefly, when a landing is to be made, the platform 14 is positioned at the rear end portion of the deck 5 with the brakes 2| off and with the bale 25 in the position shown in Figure 3 of the drawings. The airplane making the landing alights on the platform M, the braking hook thereunder engaging the bale 25 as said airplane passes thereover. Thus, the carriage I with the platform I4, on which the airplane is now resting, is connected to said airplane and is caused to move forwardly therewith by the momentum thereof. When the airplane is connected to the bale 25, said bale 25 is pulled forwardly in a manner to rotate the shaft 22.

with the gear 23 thereon. The gear 23 actuates the rack bar I! rearwardly for swinging the levers l9 through the medium of the links [8. When the levers I9 are thus actuated, the outer ends thereof flex the resilient shoes 2! outwardly against the side walls 3 of the pit l for bringing the carriage to a stop. The crash net or guard l6 may be swung downwardly to permit the plane to pass thereover when leaving the platform I4.

It is believed that the many advantages of an airplane landing and retarding apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention will be readily understood, and although a preferred embodiment of the device is as illustrated and described, it is to be understood that changes in the details of construction and in the combination and arrangement of parts may be resorted to which will fall within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed is:

An airplane landing and retarding apparatus of the character described comprising an elongated pit, longitudinal rails in said pit, an elongated deck mounted longitudinally above the pit, a carriage operable on the rails in the pit, a platform, for receiving an airplane making a landing, mounted on said carriage and operable above the deck, brakes on the carriage frictionally engageable with certain of the walls of the pit, a bale mounted for swinging movement on the carriage,

said balefor connection with an airplane for anchoring said airplane on the platform, a lever secured to said bale, a pinion on said lever, a rack movable by said pinion, and additional levers movable by said rack to apply said brakes, for braking the carriage with the airplane on the platform.

OSWALD GERRARD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2484230 *Mar 8, 1947Oct 11, 1949Westinghouse Electric CorpPlane-landing catapult
US2696957 *Apr 27, 1948Dec 14, 1954Brown OwenLanding and launching system for aircraft
US2799988 *Jun 8, 1953Jul 23, 1957Power Generators LtdCatapult device
US4147317 *Jun 23, 1977Apr 3, 1979All American Industries, Inc.Mobile RPV landing deck
US4653706 *Jul 29, 1985Mar 31, 1987Youssef RagiabEmergency aircaft landing device
US6685387 *Sep 13, 2001Feb 3, 2004Engineered Arresting Systems CorporationJet blast resistant vehicle arresting blocks, beds and methods
US6971817 *Jan 9, 2004Dec 6, 2005Engineered Arresting Systems CorporationJet blast resistant vehicle arresting blocks, beds and methods
US7261490 *Oct 19, 2005Aug 28, 2007Engineered Arresting Systems CorporationJet blast resistant vehicle arresting blocks, beds and methods
US7597502Jul 9, 2007Oct 6, 2009Engineered Arresting Systems CorporationVehicle arresting blocks, beds and methods
US8021074Apr 6, 2007Sep 20, 2011Engineered Arresting Systems CorporationCapped and/or beveled jet blast resistant vehicle arresting units, bed and methods
US8021075Apr 6, 2007Sep 20, 2011Engineered Arresting Systems CorporationCapped and/or beveled jet blast resistant vehicle arresting units, bed and methods
Classifications
U.S. Classification244/110.00E
International ClassificationB64F1/00, B64F1/02
Cooperative ClassificationB64F1/02
European ClassificationB64F1/02