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Publication numberUS2380604 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1945
Filing dateApr 27, 1942
Priority dateApr 27, 1942
Publication numberUS 2380604 A, US 2380604A, US-A-2380604, US2380604 A, US2380604A
InventorsMelton Clarence C
Original AssigneeTranscontinental & Western Air
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning apparatus for oil coolers
US 2380604 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 31, 1945. c. c. MELTON 2,380,604

CLEANING APPARATUS FOR OIL COOLERS Filed April 27, 1942 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVEN TOR. /me/yce G Mafia/7 ATTOANEK July 31, c c MEL-TON CLEANING APPARATUS FOR OIL COOLERS Filed April 27, 1942 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 0 121 7a If INVENTOR.

fi/ane/rce 6. Me/ian July 31, 1945. c. c. MELTON I CLEANING APPARATUS FOR OIL COOLERS Filed April 27, 1942 .3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. C/afleflce Cf Me/fo BY eI g:

Patented July 31, 1945 CLEANING APPARATUS FOR OIL COQLERS Clarence C. Melton, Kansas City, Mo., assignor to Transcontinental & Western Air, Inc., North Kansas City, Mo., a corporation of Delaware Application April 27, 1942, Serial No. 440,664

10 Claims.

This invention relates to apparatus for cleaning oil coolers, radiators and analogous devices wherein passageways or spaces are normally difficult to reach and from which sediment must be periodically removed to insure eflicient opertion thereof, and the primary object is the provision of means for forcing a cleaning liquid to and from the spaces of the unit being cleaned in periodic surges as the position of the device is shifted.

One of the important aims of the instant invention is the provision of cleanin apparatus for oil coolers having the ability of forcing cleaning liquid into the oil cooler and simultaneously shifting the position of said cooler in order to overcome any tendency of sediment therein to lodge, due to the action of gravity or the movement of the cleaning liquid therethrough.

This invention has for an even further object to provide apparatus of the aforementioned character wherein is incorporated an unique means for directing cleaning liquid through the cooler being treated in two directions for the purpose of establishing periodic surges, said means comprising a series of tubes having novel connections permitting a shifting of the oil cooler being cleaned, about an axis of rotation as the cleaning liquid enters and leaves the co ler.

Minor objects of the invention include specific details of construction and arrangement of parts whereby the employment of a single motor or source of power will both rotate the oil cooler and direct cleaning liquid to and from the same.

Other objects of the invention will appear 3 is a fragmentary detailed sectional view taken on l ne IIIIII of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged detailed sectional view taken on line IVIV of Fig. 3; and

Fig. 5 is a horizontal sectional view taken on line V-V of Fig. 1.

It is highly important that foreign matter,

such as minute metal parts, grit and other abrasive substances, be removed from oil coolers of internal combustion engines, and especially such devices as are used with airplane engines.

Cleaning oil coolers by merely passing liquid to and from the same as they remain stationary, has not been satisfactory. The action of gravity upon small metal particles that lodge in the oil cooler during normal operation of the engine,

are retained by the cooler unless the position thereof is shifted periodically as the cleaning liquid is forced therethrough. In many instances, it is impossible to overcome the difficulty of removing all solid particles, unless the direction of flow of the cleaning liquid through the cooler is periodically reversed as the position of the cooler is altered.

The apparatus contemplated by this invention provides adequate mechanism for shifting the position of the oil cooler or radiator as a pump directs liquid thereto in periodic surges. The illustrated embodiment has been used to a point of assuring its practicability, especially where two oil coolers 8 are to be simultaneously cleaned.

Referring in detail to the drawings, the numeral l0 designates a reservoir of any character capable of holding a volume of cleaning liquid l2, the level l4 whereof is above the intake and outlet ports I6 and i8 respectively of cylinder 20 forming a part of the liquid Du p A piston 22 reciprocably mounted for rectilin ear movement in cylinder 20 is driven through its paths of travel by motor 24 joined to piston 22 through the medium of connecting rod 26, crank 28 and driven shaft 30. Conventional speed reduction gearing, generally designated by the numeral 32, may be interposed between motor 24 and driven shaft 30, which gearing is in this instance, connected to pulley 34 by drive shaft 36. Pulley 34 is provided with conventional belt 38 which passes over the pulley on the motor shaft 24.

Through the parts just set down, it will be obvious that motor 24 will reciprocate piston 22 within cylinder 20. These parts are mounted upon a platform 40 which is supported on the top end of reservoir ID in order to render the assembly and manipulation of the apparatus convenient and effective.

Oil coolers 8 have fittings 42 and 44 as a part thereof. These fittings are employed to connect the cooler when the latter is associated with an engine.

In the illustrated embodiment, two coolers are mounted in a holder 46 bodily journalled in bearings 48 on platform 40. The holder 46 comprises a pair of cradles 50, either one or .both of which may be used and into which is disposed oil coolers 8. Suitable clamps 52 rigidly mount coolers 8 within cradles and after such mounting, hose lengths 54 and 56 are respectively joined to fittings 42 and 44. A tubular section 58 disposed between cradles 50 and connected to pipe 60 joins one end of each hose length 54 through the medium of stufilng boxes 62, ,as illustrated in Fig. 5. Set-screws 64 in bearings 48 maintain tubular section .56 in staiionary position as fitting 66 is rotated by ratchets 68 mounted thereon in a manner hereinafter set down.

Fitting 66 is hollow and one leg of the U- shaped cradle 50 is attached thereto, as shown in Fig. l. Hose lengths 54 are joined to fittings 66 by elbows 10.

The pipe 60 which communicates with tubular section 58 is joined to the outlet port l8 of cylinder 20. This tubular section 58 has an expansion chamber 12 projecting upwardly therefrom upon which is a pressure gauge 14 and a check valve 15. A hose'lfi extends to a source of compressed air.

Each cooler 8 is joined to a hose 80 through the medium of nipple 82 extended into hear-- ing 48 and there sealed against leakage, as any stuffing box arrangement will insure. Hose 80 communicates with nipple 82 through ,fitting 84 which remains stationary as nipple 82 rotates.

Hose 80 extends to a catch basin 86 provided with a tray 88 formed with a screened bottom 90 for retaining solid particles as the cleaning liquid returns to reservoir I through connection 92. Intake port I6 of cylinder 20 has a valve 94 to control the passage of liquid I2 through port I6. A screen 96 precludes the passage of entrained particles through valve 94, which is periodically opened and closed by rod 98 normally and yieldably maintained against the periphery of a cam I00 mounted on driven shaft 30. A coil spring I02 circumscribes the lower end of rod 98 and has its upper end hearing against a shoulder I04 on rod 98 and its lower end against valve 94. Spring I02 is strong enough to urge said rod against cam I00 as the same is rotated.

Holder 46 is rotated in bearings 48 in stepby-step movement by ratchets 68 forced about their axis of rotation by dogs I06. These dogs have bifurcated free ends to preclude lateral displacement and each are pivotally mounted as at I08 to the free end of an' arm I I0, the fixed ends of which are pinned or otherwise secured as at 2' to shaft II4 journalled in bearings II6 on platform 40. A spring II8 yieldably maintains the bifurcated free end of each dog I06 against the teeth of its ratchet 68.

A relatively long rocker arm I20 fastened to shaft H4 at one end, extends to a point above the upper end of connecting rod 26 where the same joins crank 28. As the interconnected portions of these members 26 and 28 move in the path of travel indicated by broken lines in Fig. 2, and in a direction shown by the arrow in said path, the outer free end of rocker arm I20 is raised and lowered, or moved about the axis of shaft II4 .to rotate the same in bearings II6. This movement on behalf of rocker arm I20 raises and lowers the free end of arms IIO to rotate ratchet 68. A set-screw I22 on platform 40 underlies rocker arm I20 and the position of said set-screw determines the distance through which the free end of rocker arm I20 will travel.

The apparatus above described will operate to not only direct cleaning liquid to and from coolers 8 in periodic surges, but will rotate the coolers to alter the position of the same to fulfill the objects hereinabove mentioned.

If but one cooler 8 is to be cleaned, one of the hose lengths 54 is not used and may be plugged in any well-known manner.

When one cooler 8, for example, is clamped in holder 48, motor 24 will serve to both rotate the holder and pump liquid I2 through the cooler. As motor 24 drives cylinder 22 of the pump, arm I20 will periodically raise and lower dog I06 on arm IIO to actuate ratchet 68.

The time required for cleaning a cooler is reduced from five hours to substantially two hours, if the position thereof is altered as above indicated. The throw of rocker arm I20 should be such as to completely reverse the position of the cooler being cleaned, once every two minutes. The pump should be timed to establish a complete surge cycle twenty times per minute.

Not only do the parts above described, permit a reversal of flow through the cooler 8, but valve 94 permits the pump to force a certain amount of cleaning liquid I2 from cooler 8 through hose 80, while a new supply of liquid I2 is injected into the system. This result is accomplished when cam I00 is positioned on drive shaft 30 to close the intake port 94. As piston 22 moves upwardly in cylinder 20, valve 94 remains closed while piston 22 moves through a portion of its upward path. The suction created in the bottom of cylinder 20 withdraws from the cooler 8 being cleaned, a quantity of cleaning liquid through pipe 60, tubular section 58 and hose length 54.

As piston 22 approaches the upper end of its path of travel, valve 94 will be opened and a quantity of cleaning liquid I2 drawn into cylinder 20 below the piston 22. When piston 22 starts its downward stroke, valve 94 is closed and the full force of the pump assembly is exerted to direct cleaning liquid through pipe 60 into cooler 8 by way of tubular section 58 and hose length 54. As such action occurs, some of the liquid in cooler 8 will be driven therefrom through hose length 56 and hose 80 from whence the liquid is returned to reservoir I0 through tray 88 and connection 92. This surging action establishes a desirable flushing of the spaces within cooler 8 in two directions. The tendency of any heavy particles to cling or pocket is overcome and when this surging action is combined with a reversal of position, a definite cleaning of all the relatively small spaces occurs.

Just before the cooler 8 is removed and after motor 24 ceases to operate, hose 18 may be connected to a source of compressed air to clear all of the passages. So directing compressed air through expansion chamber I2 will evacuate not only the cooler 8, but such hose and pipe connections as have been used to convey cleaning liquid to and from the same.

Obviously apparatus embodying the broad concepts of this invention might be made to present physical characteristics different from those shown and described, and therefore, it is desired to be limited only by the scope of the appended claims. I

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. In apparatus for cleaning oil coolers or the like, a holder for supporting the cooler being cleaned; means for bodily tippingthe holder and cooler about an axis extending through the latter to alter the position of the latter; a restrvoir for cleaning liquid; a pump; and a. series of pipes interconnecting the pump, the cooler and the reservoir, adapted to convey cleanin liquid to and from the cooler as the same is having its position altered.

2. In apparatus for.cleaning oil coolers or the like, a, holder for supporting the cooler being cleaned; means including a motor for bodily tipping the holder and cooler about an axis extending through the latter to shift the position of the latter; a reservoir for cleaning liquid; a pump having connection with the cooler adapted to convey liquid thereto as the cooler is shifted about th said axis; a connection being cleaned; means including a motor for bodily tipping the holder and cooler to shift the position of the latter about an axis extending therethrough; a reservoir for cleaning liquid; a pump having connection with the cooler adapted to convey liquid thereto as the cooler is shifted about the said axis; a connection between the pump and th reservoir whereby the pump is adapted to convey liquid therefrom to the cooler and pipes joining the cooler and reservoir adapted to return liquid to the latter as the cooler is shifted, said motor being operably connected to th pump to actuate the same as the holder is rotated thereby.

4. In apparatus for cleaning oil coolers or the like, a holder for supporting the cooler being cleaned; means for bodily tipping the holder and cooler to shift the position of the latter about an axis extending therethrough; a. pump to force cleaning liquid to the cooler as the position of the same is being shifted about the said axis; a series of pipes joining the pump and the cooler having connections permitting bodily tipping of the holder; and a stationary pipe for conveying liquid from the cooler having connections with the cooler permitting such bodily tipping of the holder.

5. In apparatus for cleaning oil coolers or the.

like, a holder for supporting the cooler being cleaned; means for bodily tipping the holder and cooler to shift the position of .the latter about'an axis extending therethrough; a pump to force cleaning liquid to the cooler as the position of the same is being shifted about the said axis; a series of stationary pipes joining the pump and the cooler having connections permitting tipping of the holder; and a stationary pipe for conveying liquid from the cooler having connections with the cooler permitting such tipping of the holder, the means for bodily tipping said holder having parts causing such tipping to occur in periodic steps.

6. In apparatus for cleaning oil coolers or the like, a holder for supporting th cooler being cleaned; means for rotating the holder and cooler to shift the position of the latter; a pump to force cleaning liquid to and from the cooler as the position of the same is being shifted; a series of continuous conduits joining the pump and the cooler having connections adapted to permit rotation of the holder; and a stationary pipe for conveying liquid from the cooler having connections with the cooler permitting such rotation of the holder, the pump having means for periodically withdrawing a certain quantity of the liquid from the cooler through said continuous conduits.

7. In apparatus for cleaning oil coolers or the like, a. holder for supporting the cooler being cleaned; means for rotating the holder and cooler to shift the position of the latter; a pump to forc cleaning liquid to and from the cooler as the position of the same is being shifted; a series of continuous pipes joining the pump and the cooler having connections adapted to permit rotation of the holder; and a pipe for conveying liquid from the cooler having connections with th cooler permitting such rotation of the holder, the means for rotating said holder having parts causing such rotation to occur in periodic steps in one direction about the axis of rotation, said pump having means for Deriodically withdrawing a certain quantity of the liquid from the cooler through said continuous pipes.

8. In apparatus for cleaning oil coolers or the like, a holder for supporting the cooler being cleaned; means for rotating the holder and cooler to shift the position of the latter; a reservoir for cleaning liquid; a pump movable through an expulsion and an intake stroke within the reservoir and having connection with the cooler to force liquid to and withdraw liquid from the latter; a valve controlling the flow of cleaning liquid from the reservoir to the pump;

stroke of the pump to cause withdrawal of a certain amount of the said liquid from the cooler prior to forcing cleaning liquid thereinto.

9. In apparatus for cleaning oil coolers or the like, a holder for supporting the cooler being cleaned; means for rotating the holder and cooler to shift the position of the latter; a reser- 1011 for cleaning liquid; a cylinder having a reciprocable piston therein within the reservoir below the level of the liquid therein, said cylinder having an intake and. an outlet port near one end thereof; a pipe joining the outlet port and said cooler; a valve in the intake port for controlling the flow of cleaning liquid from the reservoir to the cylinder; means for reciprocating the piston within the cylinder; and means for opening and closing the said valve in synchronism with the movement of the piston, said valve being closed by said means during a portion of the intake strok of the piston whereby to cause withdrawal of a certain quantity of the cleaning liquid from the cooler through the outlet port prior to forcing liquid to the cooler.

10. In apparatus for cleaning oil coolers or the like; a holder for supporting the cooler being cleaned; a reservoir for cleaning liquid; a pump; pipes interconnecting the pump and the cooler to convey cleaning liquid to and from the latter; pipes joining the cooler and said reservoir for carrying liquid from the former to the latter; and means for intermittently moving the holder to shift the position of the cooler, said pump having structure forming a part thereof adapted to force a quantity of cleaning liquid into the cooler and a portion of said quantity of liquid therefrom in one direction during intermittent periods of time and to withdraw some of the remaining portion of the quantity of cleaning liquid therefrom in the opposite direction during the intervals of time ,be- I tween said periods as the position of the cooler

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2493120 *Apr 3, 1945Jan 3, 1950Eaton Belden HMethod of internally cleaning bearings of engines
US2508119 *May 12, 1945May 16, 1950Rosenblad CorpMethod of operating heat exchangers
US2529756 *Jan 17, 1945Nov 14, 1950Bacus James LDevice for cleaning radiators
US2624354 *Oct 29, 1948Jan 6, 1953Joseph R OkonMachine for cleaning oil cooler radiators, etc.
US3608568 *Feb 9, 1970Sep 28, 1971Sturtevant Eng Co LtdMachines for processing articles
US3633594 *Feb 13, 1970Jan 11, 1972Sturtevant Eng Co LtdMachines for processing articles
US4054150 *Jul 29, 1976Oct 18, 1977Thomas Dalton AApparatus for cleaning a cooling system
US4276914 *May 22, 1978Jul 7, 1981Albertson Robert VCleaning apparatus and method
US4378034 *Dec 11, 1980Mar 29, 1983Albertson Robert VMethod of cleaning, and filling liquid accommodating apparatus
US4390049 *Dec 11, 1980Jun 28, 1983Albertson Robert VApparatus for reciprocating liquid in a cooling system of an internal combustion engine
US4627798 *Apr 24, 1986Dec 9, 1986Thomas Dalton AApparatus for circulating cleaning fluid through a cooling system
US5339845 *Jul 26, 1993Aug 23, 1994Fuel Systems Textron, Inc.Cleaning apparatus and method for fuel and other passages
US5443085 *Apr 14, 1994Aug 22, 1995Fuel Systems Textron, Inc.Cleaning apparatus and method for fuel and other passages
US6260565 *Sep 21, 1998Jul 17, 2001Maytag CorporationDouble dishwasher
US6460555Aug 22, 2000Oct 8, 2002Maytag CorporationDual dishwasher construction
US6491049Aug 22, 2000Dec 10, 2002Maytag CorporationLid construction for drawer dishwasher
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/140, 134/86, 134/147, 134/171, 134/169.00A, 134/150, 134/169.00R, 134/111, 134/159
International ClassificationF28G9/00
Cooperative ClassificationF28G9/00
European ClassificationF28G9/00